Program

Wednesday 5 July

9.00 - 10.40 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions I

221/72 - Revisiting fundamental dimensions of stereotype content

Room: Manuel Falla

The well-established Stereotype Content Model (warmth, competence) has recently been complemented by a data-driven ABC model (agency, conservative-vs.-progressive beliefs; communion as emergent quality). Proponents of both models engage in a constructive dialogue regarding the boundary conditions of both models.

Chair:

Roland Imhoff

Psychologist. Social and Legal Psychology. Department of Psychology. Johannes Gutenberg University. Mainz. Germany

221/7201 The ABC of Stereotypes - a data-driven approach

Complementing existing models of stereotype content with a data driven bottom-up approach (N > 4000) we show that people judge and compare social groups primarily on agency and conservative-vs.-progressive beliefs. Communion emerged at the center of this distribution.

Roland Imhoff

Psychologist. Social and Legal Psychology. Johannes Gutenberg University. Mainz. Germany

221/7202 Refining the ABC model of spontaneous group stereotypes: C is an independent dimension

There is a debate whether or not people spontaneously use warmth stereotypes to mentally organize groups. In six studies I show that warmth stereotypes are spontaneous but overlooked in group-level analyses because individuals disagree on which groups are warm.

Alex Koch

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/7203 Being primary doesn’t mean being shared: Toward a consideration for the psychological meaning of warmth

According to the ABC model, participants neglect warmth in their representation of social groups and focus instead on agency and beliefs. We present four studies suggesting that warmth is in fact a primary dimension of social perception.

Vincent Yzerbyt

Psychologist. Institut des Sciences Psychologiques. Catholic University of Louvain. Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium.

Julie Terache

Psychologist. Institut des Sciences Psychologiques. Catholic University of Louvain. Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium.

221/7204 Groups in the neighborhood or the nation: What do we want to know about strangers?

Addressing the spontaneity of trait-dimension usage, two studies find evidence for the priority of warmth in information gathering about groups when framed in an interpersonal, psychological context, but the priority of competence and status in a more structural, sociological context.

Gandalf Nicolas

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Princeton University. Princeton. USA.

Susan T. Fiske

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.

221/7205 Discussion

Andrea Abele Brehm

Psychologist. Social Psychology and Gender Research. Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Erlangen. Germany.

221/112 - Collective Emotions, Collective Gatherings, and Emotional Synchronization

Room: Machuca

Collective emotional events (terrorist attacks, natural/technological disasters, collective losses…) trigger search for information and social sharing of emotions. Presented research examined such social responses as emotional synchronization following upheavals. Findings are discussed in reference to demonstrated self-transcendence effects of synchronization.

Chair:

Bernard Rimé

Psychologist, Psychological Sciences Research Institute, University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

221/11201 Collective Responses to the Paris Terrorist Attacks of November 2015

We investigated collective emotions through Twitter messages during the month after the Paris terrorist attacks of November 2015. Psycholinguistic analyses showed that individual negative emotions are followed by positive affect and social cohesion as part of a social resilience process.

David García

Computer Scientist, System Designs, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Bernard Rimé

Psychologist, Psychological Sciences Research Institute, University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

221/11202 Searching for Information and Distraction in the Wake of Upheavals

In the weeks around each of four major upheavals (bombings, shooting, hurricane), Internet search terms from affected users were compared to those of unaffected U.S. people. Responses to an emotional event was thus captured free of self-reports or demand characteristics.

James Pennebaker

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, U.S.

Kayla Jordan

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, U.S.

Ryan Boyd

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, U.S.

221/11203 Collective Gatherings, Identification and Attitudes Towards In-group and Out-group: Dark and Bright Sides of Synchronization

Two studies examine the link between collective gatherings, social beliefs and collective emotions. Higher emotional synchrony predicted positives outcomes controlling for baseline of dependent variables. Results are discussed in terms of inclusive and exclusive effects of collective gatherings

Dario Páez

Psychologist, Departamento de Psicología Social y Metodología, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, San Sebastian, Spain

Nekane Basabe

Psychologist, Departamento de Psicología Social y Metodología, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, San Sebastian, Spain

Fuad Hatibovic

Psychologist, Departamento de Psicología Social y Metodología, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, San Sebastian, Spain

221/11204 Residents' Health and Safety/Crimes in Cities with High vs. Low Level of Collective Emotional Gatherings

Would living in a social environment high in collective activities favor residents' health and safety? Residents of High and Low folklore cities were compared for medical drugs consumption. The two types of cities were also compared for crime statistics

Bernard Rimé

Psychologist, Psychological Sciences Research Institute, University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Jessica Morton

Psychologist, Psychological Sciences Research Institute, University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Moïra Mikolajczak

Psychologist, Psychological Sciences Research Institute, University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Hervé Avalosse

Social scientist, Département Recherche & Développement, Mutualité Chrétienne-Christelijke Mutualiteit, Belgium

Susanne Karstedt

Sociologist, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia

221/99 - New Directions in the Study of Prejudice in Childhood and Adolescence

Room: Picasso

Prejudice remains a pressing social issue that can perpetuate social inequalities and fuel intergroup conflict. We showcase research from across Europe and beyond that aims to enhance our empirical and theoretical understanding of prejudice and victimization in childhood and adolescence.

Chair:

Jennifer R. Steele

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada

221/9901 Experimental evidence for an intervention preparing Dutch school children for the arrival of refugee children.

Effectiveness of an extended contact intervention to prepare school children for the arrival of refugee children was investigated. Friendship stories were read about Dutch children interacting with refugee children resulting in less intergroup anxiety but no changes in descriptive norms.

Allard Feddes

Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Sophie Knape

Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

221/9902 Stories that move them: Changing children’s behaviour toward diverse peers

Using a repeated measures design, a value-in-diversity storybook intervention decreased young children’s tendency to racially self-segregate. However, this effect was short-lived and not observed up to 48 hours later. Implications for teacher-led interventions to reduce childhood prejudice will be discussed.

Amanda Williams

Lecturer in Psychology, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, England

Shelley McKeown Jones

Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, England

Kristin Pauker

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA

221/9903 The effect of social categorization on children’s implicit attitudes

Non-Black children who categorized smiling Black and neutral White targets by race demonstrated an implicit pro-White bias. However, children who categorized by emotional expression, or who viewed an adult functionally use emotion, showed an implicit preference for smiling Black targets.

Jennifer R. Steele

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada

Corey Lipman

Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada

Amanda Williams

Lecturer in Psychology, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, England

221/9904 Trajectories of Victimization in Ethnic Diaspora Immigrant and Native Adolescents: Separating Acculturation from Development

This longitudinal study showed that developmental and acculturative processes interact in explaining victimization among immigrant adolescents. Results suggest similar pathways to victimization compared to native youth once the phase transition of resettlement has been successfully managed.

Philipp Jugert

University of Leipzig

Peter F. Titzmann

Professor, Department of Psychology, Leibniz University Hannover and University of Zurich

221/9905 Discussant

The discussant will note central themes developed across the presentations, drawing out the contributions this specific research has made to the field, identifying current and future directions of the study of prejudice in children.

Lindsey Cameron

Senior Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Kent, Kent, England

221/161 - From Me to We and Back Again: The dynamic relationship between personal and interpersonal evaluations

Room: Dinner 1

We highlight the dynamic interplay between self-perceptions and interpersonal processes. The first two presentations demonstrate that self-enhancement and narcissism can undermine interpersonal interactions and evaluations. The second two presentations demonstrate that interpersonal interaction is sometimes essential to improving self-understanding.

Chair:

Jennifer Howell

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ohio University. Athens. USA.

221/16101 The Dark Side of Self-Enhancement: Why is Self-Enhancement Associated with Negative Interpersonal Evaluations?

Two experiments demonstrated that participants who read a self-enhancing claim evaluated the claimant more negatively than participants who read a non-self-enhancing claim. The negative evaluations associated with the self-enhancing claim were mediated by trustworthiness, narcissism, and threat to self-worth.

Erin O'Mara

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Dayton. Dayton. USA

Claire Hart

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Southampton. Southampton. UK.

Erica Hepper

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Surrey. Guildford. UK.

Michelle Luke

Psychologist. Business and Management. University of Sussex. Brighton. UK.

221/16102 Narcissism Impairs Interpersonal Emotion Identification

What underpins narcissists’ interpersonal failures? Two online studies showed that maladaptive narcissism facets were associated with poor performance on emotion identification tasks, mediated by alexithymia and empathic concern. Adaptive narcissism facets also showed some deficits despite good emotion understanding.

Erica Hepper

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Surrey. Guildford. UK.

Claire Hart

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Southampton. Southampton. UK.

221/16103 The Emergence of a Sense of Self through Social Interaction

In three experiments we demonstrated that social interaction, but not introspection, enhances people’s sense of self. Specifically, communication that fosters a shared identity is an effective foundation for grounding self-views, thereby strengthening individuals’ personal identity and clarifying their self-concepts.

Namkje Koudenburg

Psychologist. Behavioral and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

S. Alexander Haslam

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/16104 Interpersonal Personality Feedback Promotes Self-Knowledge

In three experiments we demonstrated that social interaction, but not introspection, enhances people’s sense of self. Specifically, communication that fosters a shared identity is an effective foundation for grounding self-views, thereby strengthening individuals’ personal identity and clarifying their self-concepts.

Jennifer Howell

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ohio University. Athens. USA

Kathryn Bollich

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Seattle University. Seattle. USA.

221/48 - Leadership and identity: Ethics, tensions, and culture

Room: Dinner 2

This symposium provides new insights into leadership theory and research by outlining how leadership is both informed by and informs people’s identities. It comprises three empirical and one conceptual presentation and a discussion by Alex Haslam.

Chair:

Rolf van Dick

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany

221/4801 Over and above: Perceived ethical leadership affects purchasing intentions because of moral self-congruence concerns

We confirm across two experimental studies that a perceived CEO’s ethical leadership contributes to customers purchasing intentions over and above any ethical advertising. This effect is due to customers’ identity concerns.

Niels Van Quaquebeke

Psychologis, Kühne Logistics University, Hamburg, Germany

Niko Goretzki

Psychologis, Kühne Logistics University, Hamburg, Germany

Jan U. Becker

Psychologis, Kühne Logistics University, Hamburg, Germany

Christian Barrot

Psychologis, Kühne Logistics University, Hamburg, Germany

221/4802 Developing as a leader: A closer look at leader-follower identity tensions

This presentation will focus on the intra-individual leader-follower identity tensions experienced in managerial transitions. I will introduce a conceptual model outlining the sources of identity tension, strategies for resolution, boundary conditions and outcomes.

Olga Epitropaki

Business School, Durham University, Durham, UK

221/4803 Start me up: Effects of leader identity entrepreneurship in start-up firms

This research furthers our understanding of the mediating processes through which a leader's crafting of a team's identity translates into follower performance. We replicate and extend previous research with an independent assessment of follower performance and in a different context.

Rudolf Kerschreiter

Psychologist, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Rolf van Dick

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany

221/4804 Identity leadership going global: Results from an international validation study of the Identity Leadership Inventory

The Identity Leadership Inventory (ILI) provides an operationalization of the social identity approach to leadership. We introduce the ILI-Global project and present preliminary analyses from over 3800 participants confirming the validity of the ILI across cultures from all six continents.

Rolf van Dick

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany

Rudolf Kerschreiter

Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Niklas Steffens

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Serap Arslan Akfirat

Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey

Lorenzo Avanzi

Trento University, Rovereto, Italy

Kitty Dumont

University of South Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa

Olga Epitropaki

ALBA Graduate Business School, Athens, Greece

221/4805 Discussion

S. Alexander Haslam

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/54 - Learning Face prototypes: Implications for social impressions and memory.

Room: Andalucía III

This symposium discusses recent empirical and theoretical advances in face-processing research, with a focus on how face prototypes are learnt and represented, how culturally stable they are, and how they influence social impressions and memory.

Chair:

Olivier Corneille

Psychologist. Professor. Psychological Sciences Research Institute. Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

221/5401 Basel Face Database: Impressions of Big Two and Big Five dimensions modeled in real photographs

Different faces are associated with different personalities. Therefore, it has been necessary to compare different persons when investigating the impact of facial personality. Using the modeling approach of the Basel Face Database allows to disentangle facial personality from the person.

Mirella Walker

Center for Social Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Sandro Schönborn

Center for Computer Graphics and Vision, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Rainer Greifeneder

Center for Social Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Thomas Vetter

Center for Computer Graphics and Vision, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

221/5402 Statistical Learning Shapes Face Evaluation

We present evidence that the statistical position of faces in a distribution learned from one’s environment of faces imbues them with social meaning: As faces deviate from a learned central tendency, they are evaluated more negatively.

Ron Dotsch

Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Ran Hassin

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.

Alexander Todorov

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Princeton University, Princeton, USA.

221/5403 Modelling dimensions of facial impressions across culture using a data-driven approach

We build data-driven facial impression models across culture for the first time, by sampling spontaneous Chinese and British impressions. We find considerable cross-cultural agreement in impression dimensions, but more complex own-group dimensionality. Future dimensional models should include categorical social groups

Clare Sutherland

Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

Xizi Liu

Department of Psychology, University of York, UK.

Yingtung Chu

Department of Psychology, University of York, UK

Lingshan Zhang

Department of Psychology, University of York, UK

Julian Oldmeadow

Department of Psychology, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia

Andrew Young

Department of Psychology, University of York, UK.

221/5404 Flipping facial preferences: Memory differentiation shapes familiarity and valence

Mere exposure and stimulus blending both increase preferences. So, a blend of highly exposed individuals should look fantastic. However, empirically such a blend looks worse than the contributing individuals. This “ugliness-in-averageness” results from differentiation of individual memories, reducing blend familiarity.

Piotr Winkielman

University of California, San Diego, USA.

Evan Carr

University of California, San Diego, USA

Diane Pecher

Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Rene Zeelenberg

Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Jamin Halberstadt

University of Otago, Otago, New Zealand.

Dave Huber

University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA.

221/5405 Induced power distorts own face recollection

Across three studies, we show that inducing a sense of low versus high power in people makes them distort their own face recollection towards role-consistent facial prototypes.

Olivier Corneille

Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Xijing Wang

University College London, London, UK.

Eva Krumhuber

University College London, London, UK.

Ana Guinote

University College London, London, UK.

221/83 - Discovering moral people

Room: Andalucía II

Identifying moral, honest, and trustworthy people is valuable, but not always easy. We discuss the settings and traits leading to successfully identifying moral people. Interestingly, identifying immoral others can not only lead to their exclusion, but also boost corrupt partnerships.

Chair:

Shaul Shalvi

Associate Professor. Psychology & Economics. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

221/8301 Preferences for truth-telling

How honest are people? We combine data from 32000 subjects and show that they forgo 78% of the potential gains from lying. This is due to a combination of wanting to be and to appear honest.

Johannes Abeler

University of Oxford

Daniele Nosenzo

Economics. University of Nottingham. Nottingham. UK.

Collin Raymond

Economics. Amherst College. USA.

221/8302 Detecting (un)justified lies: Robin Hood Takes a Polygraph

We found in lab experiment that people cheat more as the possibility to justify their dishonest acts with altruistic considerations increases. Moreover, these altruistic cheaters were less likely to be detected by the lie detector than egocentric cheaters.

Shahar Ayal

Psychology. IDC Herzeliya. Herzeliya. Israel

Dar Peleg

Psychology. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel.

Guy Hochman

Psychology. IDC Herzeliya. Herzeliya. Israel.

Dan Ariely

Business School. Duke. USA.

221/8303 The modular nature of trustworthiness detection

We present an overview of three papers on trustworthiness detection. We show that trustworthiness detection is a genuine and effortless ability, possessed in equal amount by people of all cognitive capacities, but whose impenetrability leads to inaccurate conscious judgments.

Astrid Hopfensitz

Toulouse School of Economics. Toulouse. France.

Jean-Francois Bonnefon

Toulouse School of Economics. Toulouse. France.

Wim de Neys

CNRS. Paris Descartes University. Paris. France.

221/8304 Finding a (dis)honest partner

Does providing freedom superior to regulating in boosting moral conduct? We tested this by forcing people to interacts with different partners versus giving them freedom to choose their partners. Freedom leads people to search (and find) a partner in crime.

Margarita Leib

Economics. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Shaul Shalvi

Psychology & Economics. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Jörg Gross

Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. Netherlands.

Theo Offerman

Economics. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

221/8305 Discussion

Fabrizio Butera will conclude the session, discussing future avenues for collaborations between social psychologists and behavioral economists seeking to discover moral people.

Fabrizio Butera

Psychology. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland.

221/77 - Language and social (in)equalities

Room: Seminar

The present symposium demonstrates how language contributes to social (in)equalities. Five talks show how voice, metaphors, and word choices subtly influence the perception of members of gender stereotyped groups and provides insights on how social (in)equalities can be reduced.

Chair:

Franziska Moser

Psychologist. Postdoc. Institute of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern, Switzerland

221/7701 Is not what you said, but how you said it: Message interpretation based on voice stereotyping

Listeners use voice to infer speakers’ sexual orientation. Message interpretation can be affected by speaker’s voice. Having a homosexual-sounding voice increase the likelihood of the message being interpreted according to gender stereotypes.

Fabio Fasoli

Psychologist. Research Fellow. School of Psychology. University of Surrey, Surrey, England, UK

Anne Maass

Professor. Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialisation. University of Padua, Padua, Italy

Raquel António

Psychologist. ISCTE-IUL. Lisbon, Portugal

Rachel Karniol

Professor. The School of Psychological Science. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv, Israel

221/7702 Gendered love: Uncovering heteronormativity in the term “Romantic Love”

Often research on romantic love has relied subtly on the assumption of heterosexuality. In three studies, aiming to investigate the term romantic love is understood, people were found to base their understandings of romantic love on heterosexual norms.

Sapphira Thorne

Psychologist. PhD Student. School of Psychology. University of Surrey. Surrey. England, UK

221/7703 How metaphors like the “glass ceiling” shape our understanding of and reactions to gender inequality

Gender inequality in the workplace is often illustrated by the metaphor of a “glass ceiling”. Two experiments (one preregistered) tested how this and other metaphors affect perceptions and explanations of gender inequality as well as support for interventions.

Suanne Bruckmüller

Psychologist. Junior Professor. Department of Psychology of Work and Social Behavior. Landau, Germany

221/7704 From caring nurses and assertive police-officers. Social role information overrides gender stereotypes in language production

In four experiments we tested the relevance of social role theory in language production. We showed that people create gender stereotypical content by combining occupational roles, personal pronouns and words denoting agency and communion in combinations as predicted by SRT.

Marie Gustafsson Sendén

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Stockholm. Sweden

Alice Eagly

Professor. Department of Psychology. Northwestern University. Evanston. USA

Sabine Sczesny

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern

221/7705 The use of gender-inclusive language: Deliberate or habitual?

Gender-inclusive language aims at reducing gender stereotyping and increase visibility of women. The present study determined to what extent intention and habits predict gender-inclusive language use. Results showed a joint influence of intention and frequency of past gender-inclusive language use.

Franziska Moser

Psychologist. Postdoc. Department of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern. Switzerland

Sabine Sczesny

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern. Switzerland

Wendy Wood

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Southern California. Los Angeles. USA

221/207 - Cultural and Situational Factors Related to Sexual and Partner Violence: Religion, Honor, Scripts, and Labelling

Room: Andalucía I

This symposium brings together novel empirical contributions which investigate potentially universal and culture-specific risk factors of sexual and partner violence, and the role of these factors on the perceptions of victims and perpetrators in ways that may render it justifiable.

Chairs:

Pelin Gul

PhD student of Social Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. England

Isabell Schuster

University of Potsdam, Germany

221/20706 Sexual Scripts as Prospective Predictors of Sexual Victimization: A Cross-Cultural Analysis

Evidence from 5 countries (Brazil, Chile, Germany, Poland, Turkey) is presented which identifies sexual scripts for consensual sex that contain risk elements of sexual victimization as prospective predictors of the experience of sexual victimization in male and female college students.

Barbara Krahé

Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Anja Berger

Kinderschutzbund, Germany

Isabell Schuster

University of Potsdam, Germany

Lylla Winzer

Mahidol University, Thailand

221/20707 Longitudinal and Contemporaneous Risk Factors of Dating Violence Perpetration: Differences and Similarities between Genders

This study reviews a large set of risk factors of adolescent dating violence in a large, multi-ethnic urban sample. The strongest effects were found for reciprocity of DV and psychological risk factors. Generally, effect sizes were similar in both genders.

Denis Ribeaud

Criminologist. Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development. University of Zurich. Zurich. Switzerland.

221/20702 The Role of Culture and Reputation Threat in Perceptions of Marital Rape Victims and Perpetrators

This study investigated perceptions of marital rape, and found that individuals from honor cultures (vs. non-honor cultures) approve the perpetrator’s behaviour more and hold him less criminally liable, but only when rape occurs after a threat to perpetrator’s masculine reputation.

Pelin Gul

PhD student of Social Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. England

Isabell Schuster

University of Potsdam, Germany

221/20704 'Victim' or 'survivor'?: Labels affect how people perceive women who have experienced intimate partner violence

Three experiments showed that the label “survivor” (versus “victim”), when applied to women who have experienced intimate partner violence, caused people to perceive these women more positively, in both general and specific contexts (e.g., professional and legal).

Marika Skowronski

Psychologist. University of Leipzig. Leipzig. Germany.

Jesús L. Megías

Professor. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

Mónica Romero-Sánchez

Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

Gerd Bohner

Professor of Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Bielefeld. Bielefeld. Germany

9.00 - 10.40 h. Blitz: Presentations I

Session 1: Social identities, social connections, health and well-being

Room: Albéniz

221/4301 Income inequality as a social curse: The GINI coefficient versus perceptions that inequality is fair

We assess the relationship between economic inequality and wellbeing in 28 countries, and show that subjective inequality perceptions are more powerful predictors of wellbeing than objective inequality indicators. Perceived legitimacy of inequality and individual mobility beliefs moderate these relationships.

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

Frank Mols

Lecturer. School of Political Science. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Kim Peters

Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/4303 Thinking about group memberships alleviates negative mood through feelings of connectedness, autonomy and self worth.

Two experimental studies demonstrated that thinking about group memberships after a negative mood induction enhanced participants’ mood to a greater degree than thinking about interpersonal relationships or films, partly due to feelings of connectedness, self-worth and autonomy associated with groups.

Arabella Kyprianides

PhD student. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. United Kingdom.

Matthew J. Easterbrook

Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. United Kingdom.

Rupert Brown

Professor. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. United Kingdom.

221/4304 Exploring social identity change during mental healthcare transition

A qualitative study investigated social identity transition and mental health service engagement in emerging adults. Adopting an illness identity encouraged continued service engagement in adulthood. Disengagement was attributed to the absence of an illness identity or an evolving adult identity.

Niamh McNamara

Senior Lecturer. School of Social Sciences. Nottingham Trent University. Nottingham. United Kingdom.

Imelda Coyne

Professor. School of Nursing & Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

Tamsin Ford

Professor. University of Exeter Medical School, University of Exeter, United Kingdom.

Moli Paul

Psychiatrist. Division of Mental Health & Wellbeing, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, UK

Swaran Singh

Psychiatrist. Division of Mental Health & Wellbeing, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, UK

Fiona McNicholas

Psychiatrist. School of Medicine & Medical Science, University College Dublin, Ireland

221/1763 Psychological energization as a novel mechanism to explain the link between group memberships and resilience

In two studies, we examined whether psychological energization (i.e. feelings of tense and energetic arousal) could explain the link between group memberships and resilience. Although the findings were mixed, this research provides the groundwork for further investigation.

Joseph Buckingham

PhD student. Department of Biological and Experimental Psychology. Queen Mary, University of London. London. UK.

Janelle Jones

Lecturer. Department of Biological and Experimental Psychology. Queen Mary, University of London. London. UK.

Thomas Mortan

Associate Professor. Psychology Department. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK.

221/1365 The Importance of School Identification for Adolescent Mental Health

In a survey of over 1000 Scottish High School students, we found that identification with the school predicted better psychological wellbeing over time. These findings have important implications for treatment and prevention of mental illness.

Kirsty Miller

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Dundee. Dundee. Scotland.

221/1227 How identification with arts groups can improve wellbeing in adults with chronic mental health conditions

59 disadvantaged adults were tracked during their first year of participation in a choir or creative writing group. Group identification and perceived social support were found to be significant predictors of improvement in mental wellbeing over time.

Elyse Williams

Psychologist. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Genevieve Dingle

Psychologist. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

221/1840 Multiple group memberships, well-being, and performance following programme transitions in elite sport

Using a longitudinal design, we examined elite youth cricketers (N=257, Mean age=15.53) transitioning into high-performance pathways. Those reporting multiple group memberships before and after the transition demonstrated both greater well-being and performance after transition, and greater new group identity.

Tim Rees

Bournemouth University

Jodie Green

University of Exeter

Kim Peters

University of Queensland

S. Alexander Haslam

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/5002 Becoming a ‘non-smoker’: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of identity transitions following cessation.

The formation of a ‘non-smoker’ identity has been proposed as necessary for long-term cessation (PRIME theory). We will discuss the significance of ‘non-smoker’ identity and transition processes observed in our qualitative work with long-term quitters and relapsed smokers.

Eleni Vangeli

Lecturer, Division of Psychology, School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London, UK

Robert West

Professor of Health Psychology, Health Behaviour Research Centre Department of Epidemiology and Public Health University College London, UK

221/5003 Mapping social identity change in online networks of addiction recovery.

Sustainable addiction recovery depends on how various resources can be mobilised to support long-term identity change. Giving that new technologies are increasingly used as such resources, we examine how online social interactions can support identity change for people in recovery.

Ana-Maria Bliuc

School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University, Australia

David Best

Professor, Department of Law and Criminology, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK

221/1713 Neighbourhood walkability and quality of life: The mediating role of place adherence and social interactions.

In 4 studies, we replicated and extended previous findings on the association between neighborhood walkability and well-being measures. We introduced potential mediators of this relationship: social interactions in the neighbourhood and identity-related variables.

Michał Jaśkiewicz

University of Gdańsk

221/1115 When health programs contribute to overweight stigma.

Health programs may backfire by framing health as being controllable, which may contribute to stigmatization of less healthy colleagues. This is confirmed in two studies that focus on the controllability perceptions of overweight and on stigmatization of overweight people.

Laetitia Mulder

University of Groningen

Susanne Tauber

University of Groningen

Session 2: Social perception and construal

Room: Machado

221/20901 Why people are judged differently than a person

Two studies demonstrate and explain non-normative differences in how abstract groups (e.g., criminals) and randomly-selected individuals (e.g., a criminal) are viewed. People view individuals as less stereotypical and more moral than the groups from which they were randomly drawn.

Clayton Critcher

Associate Professor of Marketing, Cognitive Science, & Psychology; University of California, Berkeley; Haas School of Business; Berkeley, CA, USA.

David Dunning

University of Michigan; Department of Psychology; Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

221/20903 Looking at it this way, I feel what I want: implications of rendering decisions quasi-factual

Individuals flip a coin when making decisions could be difficult. We provide evidence that such a coin toss may change the decision-making situation by reducing psychological distance, in particularly strengthening feelings and allowing for more affect-driven decisions.

Mariela Jaffé

Psychologist. Center for Social Psychology. University of Basel. Switzerland.

Leonie Reutner

Psychologist. PhD. Center for Social Psychology. University of Basel. Switzerland.

Rainer Greifeneder

Psychologist. Professor. Center for Social Psychology. University of Basel. Switzerland.

221/20904 How temporal distance influences the affective and cognitive bases of candidate evaluations in political campaigns

Using panel data from the German Longitudinal Election Study (GLES) we demonstrate that the association of candidate evaluations with emotions elicited by the candidates increased substantially as a function of diminishing temporal distance to the election.

Axel Burger

Psychologist. School of Social Sciences. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

Alexander Jedinger

GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Cologne, Germany.

221/1418 Lay conceptions of intuition and analysis: a prototype approach

Participants’ open-ended descriptions of what it means to “act intuitively” and “act analytically” (Study 1) were sorted into categories rated in centrality (Study 2). Participants’ own intuitive and analytical styles predicted centrality ratings, suggesting they might represent these processes differently.

Filipe Loureiro

PhD Candidate. William James Center for Research. ISPA-Instituto Universitário. Lisbon. Portugal

Teresa Garcia-Marques

Psychologist Professor, Social and Organization Psychology Department, ISPA- Instituto Universitário, Lisboa, Portugal

Duane Wegener

Professor. Department of Psychology. The Ohio State University. Columbus. Ohio. USA

221/1502 Smartphone psychology: Measuring approach-avoidance motivations in the field

We successfully tested a newly developed mobile version of the approach-avoidance task (AAT). The mobile AAT allows researchers to easily measure approach-avoidance-motivations in ecologically valid field studies. Additionally, it is the first task to successfully detect approach-motivations based on movement-force.

Hilmar G. Zech

PhD candidate. Institute of Psychology. Unit of Social and Organisational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands

lotte van dillen

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Institute of Psychology. Unit of Social and Organisational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands

Wilco W van Dijk

Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology. Unit of Social and Organisational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands

Mark Rotteveel

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Social Psychology Program. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

221/1540 Inferring about “what could have happened” in social situations and its development during school-age years

This research analyses mainly the inferential accuracy and the ability to differentiate hypothetical and real situation (epistemic status) in children. Results showed an evolutionary development in the ability to infer and an extreme difficulty in epistemic questions.

Jesica Gómez-Sánchez

Researcher. Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación. University of Granada. Granada: Spain.

Sergio Moreno-Ríos

Professor. Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación. University of Granada. Granada: Spain.

221/1010 It could have been me: Counterfactual thinking as a motivator to donate to disaster victims

Three studies showed that physical proximity to disaster victims causes counterfactual thoughts, as did hypothetical proximity (i.e. wanting to go to the disaster location) and vicarious proximity (knowing others who have been there). Counterfactuals then increase willingness to help victims.

Hanna Zagefka

Reader. Dept of Psychology. Royal Holloway University of London. London. UK

221/1563 Not living up to the norm: Counterfactual attacks affect target evaluation by referring to group-based standards

We investigated the desirability and typicality of different personality dimensions for different professional groups. Counterfactual attacks were found to make prescriptive profession-specific norms salient. Upward comparison with desirable (but not typical) behaviour resulted in a negative evaluation of the target.

Mauro Bertolotti

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Catholic University of Milan. Milan. Italy

Patrizia Catellani

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan. Milan. Italy

221/1183 A replication of prime-to-behavior effect with no moderation by prime duration or self-consciousness

We propose a replication of unconscious prime-to-behavior effects and additionally test the role of prime duration as well as, of the self-consciousness. Results indicate that prime-to-behavior effects are replicable though not moderated by prime duration or self-consciousness.

Doriane Daveau

PhD student. University of Bordeaux. Bordeaux. France

François Ric

Professor. University of Bordeaux. Bordeaux. France

221/1273 The effect of sleep deprivation on social interaction: Data from sociometers

Sociometers were used to compare communication in dyadic interactions following sleep deprivation and normal sleep. No difference was found in frequency of speaking turns, speaking duration or silence duration. This suggests sleep deprivation does not alter participation in dyadic interactions.

Benjamin holding

PhD Student. Karolinska Institutet. Stockholm. Sweden

Tina Sundelin

Postdoc. Karolinska Institutet. Stockholm. Sweden

John Axelsson

Associate Professor. Karolinska Institutet. Stockholm. Sweden

221/1107 Is there hindsight bias without hindsight?

N = 100 participants rated the likelihood of different outcomes regarding the missing flight MH370 in 2014 and 2015. Comparing participants’ reconstructions of earlier judgments to topical judgments, we found hindsight distortions were triggered by a mere change in presumptions.

Ina von der Beck

Psychologist. Knowledge Construction Group. Leibniz-Institut fuer Wissensmedien, Tuebingen, Germany.

Aileen Oeberst

Psychologist. Junior-Professor. Forensic Psychology. Institute for Psychology. Johannes-Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany.

221/1100 Gender differences in Aha-experiences

Aha-experiences from 331 participants were analyzed applying Bayesian statistics and with a gender perspective. Women reported more personal and communal Aha-experiences, while men reported more impersonal and individual experiences, seemingly supporting an essentialist view on gender.

Oeystein Olav Skaar

Department of Psychology, University of Oslo

Rolf Reber

Department of Psychology, University of Oslo

10.40 - 11.10 h. Coffee Break

11.10 - 12.50 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions II

221/109 - Ego-depletion: Where do we Go from Here?

Room: Manuel Falla

Debates on whether and how self-regulatory failure would occur are still going on. In this symposium, we discuss recent evidence on the absence of the ego-depletion effect, and discuss perspectives on design features that may moderate the effect, theoretical explanations and perspectives on self-regulator failure.

Chair:

Oulmann Zerhouni

Associate Professor of Social and Experimental Psychology, Parisian Laboratory of Social Psychology. Paris. France.

221/10901 Picking through the wreckage with a stick: Lessons learned from the ego-depletion replication and suggestions

Recent evidence has questioned the existence of the ego-depletion effect. I discuss some lessons learned from a multi-lab replication of the ego-depletion effect including study design, respond to critiques of the replication and provide suggestions for future ego-depletion research.

Martin Hagger

John Curtin Distinguished Professor. School of Psychology and Speech Pathology. Curtin University/University of Jyväskylä. Perth/Jyväskylä. Australia/Finland.

221/10902 Investigating the Ego Depletion Effect in Within-Participants Designs

Ego depletion (impaired performance after an initial self-control task) is usually examined using between-participants designs. Given current considerations regarding statistical power, small effects and large required samples, two studies developed and empirically tested a within-participants design investigating ego depletion effects.

Karolin Gieseler

Research Associate. Department of Psychology, Saarland University. Sarrebruck. Germany.

Christina Herrmann

PhD Student. Department of Psychology, Saarland University. Homburg. Germany.

David Loschelder

Professor for Business Psychology and Experimental Methods. Department of Strategic HRM. University of Lueneburg. Lueneburg. Germany.

Veronika Job

Research Associate. Department of Psychology, University of Zurich. Zurich. Switzerland.

Malte Friese

Director of the Department of Psychology. Department of Psychology, Saarland University. Sarrebruck. Germany.

221/10903 Depleted or detached? Testing a process model of perceived opportunity costs

Why does performing certain tasks and activities cause the aversive experience of mental effort accompanied by task disengagement? In a large experience sampling study (Nobs = 9,994) we validated an integrative model of the antecedents and consequences of perceived opportunity costs.

Sarah Rom

PhD student. Social Cognition Center Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne. Germany.

Wilhelm Hofmann

Full Professor of Social and Economic Cognition. Social Cognition Center Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne. Germany.

221/10904 Depleted but not swayed: does changes in self-control processes reduce evaluative conditioning?

In two studies, we investigated how altering volitional control would moderate evaluative conditioning. We found that less neutral and valenced stimuli pairs were memorized by depleted participants, and that bolstering volitional processing of stimuli increased evaluative conditioning.

Oulmann Zerhouni

Associate Professor of Social and Experimental Psychology. Parisian Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Paris Nanterre. Paris. France.

Laurent Bègue

Full Professor of Social Psychology. LIPPC2S. University Grenoble-Alpes. Grenoble. France.

Reinout Wiers

Full professor of developmental psychopathology. Addiction Development and Psychopathology (ADAPT) lab. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/10905 Effects of trait self-control on experienced and i

The importance of understanding self-control is evident considering its importance in life. Two studies investigated whether trait self-control affects response conflict. Self-control was not associated with size of conflicts, but people with high trait self-control were faster to resolve conflicts.

Marleen Gillebaart

Assistant Professor. Social, Health, and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands

221/94 - When and why mindfulness is an adaptive toolkit

Room: Machuca

Why is mindfulness adaptive? This symposium will discuss how mindfulness changes the negative impact of ambivalence, uncertainty, or a negative future prospect on emotions. It also debates when is it reasonable to expect mindfulness to result in healthier behaviour.

Chair:

Gabriela Jiga-Boy

Senior lecturer. Department of Psychology. Swansea University. Swansea. United Kingdom.

221/9401 Mindfulness influences how people experience attitudinal ambivalence

We examined links between mindfulness and ambivalence. Mindfulness was positively correlated with ambivalence comfort and negatively correlated with ambivalence frequency, objective ambivalence, and subjective ambivalence. Further, the link between greater ambivalence and corresponding negative affect was buffered by mindfulness.

Geoffrey Haddock

Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK

Colin Foad

Lecturer. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK

Ben Windsor-Shellard

Graduate student. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK

221/9402 Exploring the link between mindfulness and the experience of uncertainty

We examined the mindfulness-uncertainty links. Mindfulness positively correlated with feeling comfortable, reacting positively and dealing with uncertainty. Underlying factors underpinning the experience of uncertainty were explored. The relationship between mental wellbeing uncertainty experience was fully mediated by mindfulness.

Inmaculada Adarves-Yorno

Senior lecturer. University of Exeter Business School. Exeter. UK

Michelle Mahdon

Associate Research Fellow. University of Exeter Business School. Exeter. UK

Leonie Schueltke

Intern. University of Exeter Business School. Exeter. UK

221/9403 Assessing the links among mindfulness, attentional control, and eating behaviour

Two studies investigate mindfulness and eating behaviour. Trait mindfulness was positively associated with attentional control, valuing health, and healthy food preference. Openness, a component of state mindfulness, resulted in significantly healthier eating, but only under conditions of low hunger.

Karis Vaughan

Graduate student. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK

Geoffrey Haddock

Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK

221/9404 Mindful future thinking: Does trait mindfulness change the effects of self-distancing on anticipated negative emotions?

Does mindfulness promote future emotion regulation? Self-distance did not improve future negative emotions, and those higher in mindfulness felt both more immersed and more positive about a negative future event. Mindfulness could alter the dynamics between future thinking and emotions.

Holly Ashton

Postgraduate student. Department of Psychology. Swansea University. Swansea. UK

Gabriela Jiga-Boy

Senior lecturer. Department of Psychology. Swansea University. Swansea. UK

221/9405 Discussion

Dr Tim Hopthrow will be the discussant concluding this symposium on "When and why mindfulness is an adaptive toolkit".

Tim Hopthrow

Senior lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

221/92 - Does Intergroup Contact Undermine Social Change?: New Insights

Room: Picasso

This symposium provides new insights into when, why, and for whom cross-group contact acts as a facilitator or a barrier to social change and highlights the complexity of contact effects with respect to social change efforts.

Chair:

Nicole Tausch

Psychologist. Reader. School Of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of St Andrews. Scotland.

221/9201 When Intergroup Contact Reduces Support for Social Change among Minorities: The Role of Reinterpreted Identities

This mixed-methods study shows how the demobilizing effects of reduced ethnic identification on support for social change following positive intergroup contact with the majority is buffered by superordinate identification and how one’s ethnic identity is reinterpreted in positive intergroup encounters.

Adrienne Pereira

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne

Eva Green

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne

221/9202 Effects of Majority Members’ Positive Contact on Minority Members’ Support for Ingroup Rights: (De)Mobilizing Effects?

Using two cross-sectional general population surveys and applying multilevel path analysis, we show that ethnic majority members’ positive contact experiences influence ethnic minority members’ support for ingroup rights at the social context level.

Oliver Christ

Psychologist. FernUniversität Hagen, Germany

Mathias Kauff

Psychologist. FernUniversität Hagen, Germany

Eva Green

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne

Katharina Schmid

Assistant Professor, Department of People Management and Organisation in ESADE. Spain.

Miles Hewstone

Psychologist. University of Oxford. UK

221/9203 Positive Cross-Group Contact: The Role of Supportive Contact in Empowering Collective Action

Four experiments show that contact marked by open recognition of unjust intergroup inequality can enhance disadvantaged group interest in collective action…most of the time.

Stephen Wright

Psychologist. Simon Fraser University. Canada.

Lisa Droogendyk

Psychologist. Sheridan College. Canada.

Siyu Qin

Psychologist. Simon Fraser University. Canada.

Winnifred Louis

Psychologist. University of Queensland. Australia.

221/9204 Intergroup Contact Increases Support for Symbolic but not Material Forms of Equality: A Longitudinal Analysis

Results of a stationary, cross-lagged, structural equation model in a six-wave, nationally representative panel study showed that contact with a minority group predicted greater support for symbolic but not material forms of equality among the majority group over time.

Nikhil Sengupta

Psychologist. University of Auckland. New Zealand.

Fiona Kate Barlow

Psychologist. University of Queensland. Australia.

Chris G. Sibley

Psychologist. University of Auckland. New Zealand.

221/9205 Becoming Allies: Cross-group Contact and Solidarity among Members of Advantaged Groups

We demonstrate a positive relation between cross-group contact and interest in solidarity-based action among members of dominant groups. We highlight the roles of empathy and structure- (but not group-) focused beliefs and affect in this relation and identify ideological predispositions.

Nicole Tausch

Psychologist. University of St Andrews. Scotland

Paulina Górska

Psychologist. Univertsity of Warsaw. Poland.

Tamar Saguy

Psychologist. IDC Herzilya. Israel.

Simon Lolliot

Psychologist. University of Oxford. UK

Michal Bilewicz

Psychologist. Univertsity of Warsaw. Poland.

Jeff Bryson

Psychologist. San Diego State University. United States.

221/63 - The subtle cues and effects of social identity threat

Room: Dinner 1

This symposium brings together researchers showing that (1) experiences of social identity threat can be shaped in subtle ways in daily social interactions; and (2) social identity threat can have subtle and unexpected effects on person perception and emotion-regulation.

Chair:

Jenny Veldman

PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/6301 Interpersonal and cultural predictors of social identity threat

Three studies examined the naturalistic cues of social identity threat for women in STEM settings. Subtly negative interpersonal experiences with men and a lack of gender inclusive policies and practices both related to higher identity threat for women.

William Hall

PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada

Toni Schmader

Professor. Department of Psychology. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada

Audrey Aday

PhD candidate. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada

Elizabeth Croft

Professor. Department of Mechanical Engineering. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada

221/6302 Talking about science: The importance of feedback appraisals when women share interests in STEM

We demonstrate gender differences in the roles of social interaction and feedback about one’s science interest. Women’s career interests were more strongly influenced than men’s by appraisals of social feedback when talking about their interest in science.

Dustin Thoman

Assistant professor. Department of Psychology. San Diego State University. San Diego. USA

Christina Curti

PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. San Diego State University. San Diego. USA

Matthew Jackson

Post-Doc researcher. Department of Psychology. San Diego State University. San Diego. USA

Jessi L. Smith

Associate professor. Department of Psychology. Montana State University. San Diego. USA

221/6303 Noticing what isn’t there: Underrepresentation of women increases the cognitive salience of other women

On the subtle effects of stigma/social identity threat; we show in an EEG study that subtle forms of stigma, namely underrepresentation of women in leadership tasks, influences the early person perception and gender categorization, particularly in low gender identified women.

Antoniella Domen

PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands

Belle Derks

Professor. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands

Ruth van Veelen

Post-Doc. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands

Daan Scheepers

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands

221/6304 Emotion regulation and working memory updating in response to stereotype threat

We examined whether social identity threat affects the regulation of daily affective experiences. An experiment demonstrated that stereotype threat reduced women’s capability to update working memory with affective information and their ability to emotionally regulate other affectively negative situations.

Jenny Veldman

PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Colette van Laar

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Loes Meeussen

Post-Doc. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Madeline Pe

Post-Doc. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Peter Kuppens

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/6305 Hidden costs of dealing with stigma and social identity threat

Examines stigma regulation, showing the hidden costs for self or group and for long- versus short-term outcomes. Finding good ways to address social-inequality means understanding how stigma is self-regulated, the choices made in the process, and the hidden costs involved.

Colette van Laar

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/61 - The crowd and wider group relations: How collective actions change or maintain societal inequalities

Room: Dinner 2

Crowds can both change unequal societal relations but can also contribute to their maintenance. This symposium discusses how collective actions impact on relations of inequality and power and how powerful group use crowds to maintain their position.

Chair:

John Drury

Reader in Social Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. United Kingdom.

221/6101 “Taking back that which is rightfully ours”: Critical Mass and the psychology of collective empowerment

This ethnography of monthly, traffic-blocking Critical Mass group bike-rides demonstrates how participants experience collective empowerment by claiming space for bikes within an oppressive, car-dominated system. In addition to changing power relations, participants experience joy by enacting politicized cyclist identity.

Scott Neufeld

Psychologist, PhD student. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada

Michael T. Schmitt

Professor. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada

Stephen D. Reicher

Professor, University of St. Andrews, St Andrews, UK

221/6102 The role of social identity and empowerment in the spread of the 2011 English riots

Analysis of the 2011 riots in London, using a novel methodology, shows that the spread of events can be understood through reference to the evolving social identity based interactional crowd dynamics of legitimacy and empowerment in relation to the police.

Clifford Stott

Professor, School of Psychology, Keele University, UK

Roger Ball

Research Fellow, School of Psychology, Keele University, UK

221/6103 Representations of cultural pathology and political argumentation: The December 2008 upheaval in Greek press accounts

The analysis focuses on political argumentation in Greek press coverage of the December 2008 crowd actions and riots in Athens. Critical discursive social psychology shows how representational practices ‘explaining’ the movement in terms of cultural pathology served to delegitimize protest.

Nikolaos Bozatzis

Assistant Professor in Social Psychology, Department of Philosophy, Education and Psychology, University of Ioannina, Greece

221/6104 How crowds stop social change: An analysis of pro-government Democracy Meetings in post-coup Turkey

We analyse the use of mass rallies to consolidate the rule of the government in post-coup Turkey. Triangulation of materials shows how the way the crowd is categorized affects estimations of support for the government and willingness to protest.

Yasemin Gülsüm Acar

Instructor, Social Science Faculty, Özyeğin University, Turkey

Stephen D. Reicher

Professor, University of St. Andrews, St Andrews, UK

221/55 - Context matters: Contextual influences on evaluative responses

Room: Andalucía III

This symposium demonstrates how context influences the formation and expression of evaluations. We show that by taking context into account, we can reconcile previously mixed findings and provide evidence that context significantly shapes affective, behavioral, and cognitive processes.

Chair:

Hannah Nohlen

Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Canada.

221/5501 Evaluative context shapes physiological responses to ambivalent information.

Ambivalence represents conflict between evaluations as well as the possibility for flexible evaluations. Theoretically, conflict is thought to elicit negative affect, but evidence is mixed regarding ambivalence. We present results from two facial EMG studies to reconcile previously inconsistent findings.

Hannah Nohlen

Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Toronto. Canada

Frenk van Harreveld

Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Mark Rotteveel

Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Ard Barends

PhD student. Department of Psychology. Free University Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Jeff Larsen

Department of Psychology. University of Tennessee. USA

221/5502 Complex Emotions and Persuasion: An Appraisal Perspective

Anger, disgust, surprise, and awe are multi-faceted emotional states. When these emotions are induced following information processing, thoughts can be used more or less with each emotion depending on whether a certainty or a pleasantness appraisal is made salient.

Pablo Briñol

Department of Psychology. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid. Spain

Richard E. Petty

Ohio State University. USA

Maria Stavraki

Universidad de Castilla la Mancha. Spain

Darío Díaz

Universidad de Castilla la Mancha. Spain

Grigorios Lamprinakos

Athens University of Economics and Business. Greece

221/5503 Fleeting beauty: Beauty-in-averageness and context-dependent reversals

Theorizing predicts that category averages are preferred over exemplars, but some findings are at odds with this hypothesis. The present framework predicts when beauty-in-averageness reverse. Hypotheses are supported by findings from three experiments, indicating the context-dependence of the beauty-in-averageness effect.

Tobias Vogel

University of Mannheim. Germany

Evan W. Carr

Columbia Business School. New York. USA

Piotr Winkielman

University of California, San Diego, USA

221/5504 Contextualized Change of Automatic Evaluations: What We Learned from Our Own File Drawer

The current talk presents the results of a meta-analysis on contextualized attitude change that included all published and unpublished studies from the authors’ research groups regardless of whether they produced the theoretically predicted pattern of results.

Bertram Gawronski

University of Texas at Austin. Austin, USA

Xiaoqing Hu

University of Hong Kong, China

Robert J. Rydell

Indiana University, USA

Bram Vervliet

University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Jan de Houwer

Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

221/5505 Regional attitudes and stereotypes predict police homicides and voting behavior

We used the region-level attitudes and stereotypes of over 2.5 million people to predict two large-scale behavioral outcomes: the disproportionate killing of Black Americans by police, and opposition to Hillary Clinton in the 2016 American presidential primary elections.

Jimmy Calanchini

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg. Freiburg. Germany

Jeffrey W. Sherman

University of California, Davis, USA

Phillip Witkowski

University of California, Davis, USA

Jehan Sparks

University of California, Davis, USA

221/42 - Impression mismanagement: Why and how people fail at self-presentation

Room: Andalucía II

This symposium demonstrates how people systematically mismanage their public impression. Such impression mismanagement occurs because people fail to take their audience’s perspective or because they try to ineptly mask their bragging. These self-presentational failures lead to interpersonal disliking.

Chair:

Janina Steinmetz

Assistant Professor at Utrecht University. Social and Organisational Psychology. Utrecht. Netherlands.

221/4201 The Hubris Hypothesis: You think you flaunt your qualities but I hear you denigrating mine

Observers dislike individuals who brag by explicitly claiming superiority to others if they (the observers) seem included among the ‘others’. Whether people dislike braggers critically depends on their attributing an unfavorable view of them to the braggers.

Vera Hoorens

Professor. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

Carolien van Damme

Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/4202 If at first you do succeed: Unforeseen social costs of being naturally successful

We show that people like naturally successful others less than others who have to work hard to succeed. However, people want to be naturally successful in the eyes of others, and portray themselves as naturally successful in impression management situations.

Janina Steinmetz

Assistant Professor. Social and Organisational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands.

221/4203 Humblebragging: A distinct–and ineffective—self-presentation strategy

Humblebragging – bragging masked as a complaint – is a ubiquitous form of self-promotion. Laboratory and field experiments show that humblebragging backfires. It is ineffective in signaling traits that people want to promote and reduces liking by decreasing perceived sincerity.

Ovul Sezer

PhD student. Harvard Business School. Cambridge. USA.

Francesca Gino

Professor. Harvard Business School. Cambridge. USA.

Michael Norton

Professor. Harvard Business School. Cambridge. USA.

221/4204 Bragging through an intermediary

Sharing positive information about oneself through an intermediary elicits more favorable responses than direct self-promotion. Intermediation effectively enhances perceptions of the target person even if the intermediary is motivated by self-interest, but it may carry image costs for the intermediary.

Irene Scopelliti

Senior Lecturer. Cass Business School. City University of London. London. UK

Joachim Vosgerau

Professor. Department of Marketing. Bocconi University. Milan. Italy

221/45 - Deviance 2.0: The social psychology of deviant opinions, expectancy violations, artistic deviance, and rule-breaking behavior

Room: Seminar

This symposium brings together lines of research that investigate the antecedents and consequences of deviant processes in order to shed light on people’s diverse reactions to deviance. We present research on deviant opinions, expectancy violations, artistic deviance, and rule-breaking behavior.

Chairs:

Eftychia Stamkou

University of Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Gerben A. van Kleef

University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

221/4501 Positive Deviance: How Authenticity Leads To Speaking Up

We show that heightening individuals’ sense of authenticity can favorably alter the way in which they evaluate opportunities to challenge the status quo, that is authenticity is associated with increased psychological safety and self-efficacy, which in turn increase speak up.

Maryam Kouchaki

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management

Andrew Brodsky

Harvard Business School

Francesca Gino

Harvard Business School

221/4502 Disfluency as an indicator of deviance: Theoretical perspectives and an empirical study

This contribution first provides an overview on research on the role of disfluency that signals deviance from the expected interaction and then presents original research on situational determinants and phenomenological dynamics of aha-experiences that resolve impasses characterized by disfluent processing.

Rolf Reber

University of Oslo

Øystein Olav Skaar

University of Oslo

221/4503 The art of influence: When and why deviant artists

Across 6 studies, our research showed that deviant artwork styles enhance an artist’s impact, especially when the artwork style is different from the style previously employed by the artist and the style currently employed by the artist’s contemporaries.

Eftychia Stamkou

University of Amsterdam

Gerben A. van Kleef

University of Amsterdam

Astrid C. Homan

University of Amsterdam

221/4504 Rebel with a Cause: Abide by Local Norms but Violate Global Norms to Gain Influence.

While norm violators are seen as powerful, they are generally not also endorsed with positions of power. We suggest that norm violators may nevertheless inspire endorsement when they abide by local group norms while they violate general societal norms

Florian Wanders

University of Amsterdam

Astrid C. Homan

University of Amsterdam

Annelies Van Vianen

University of Amsterdam

Gerben A. van Kleef

University of Amsterdam

221/4505 Discussion

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

221/174 - The Deprived and the Privileged: Social Class and Inequality Outcomes on Cognition, Motivation and Achievement

Room: Andalucía I

This symposium examines how both social-class (dis)advantages and social-economic stratification may impact individuals’ cognition, motivation and achievement. We review a large spectrum of mechanisms from low-level cognition to structural dynamics that broaden our understanding of social reproduction.

Chairs:

GOUDEAU Sébastien

Doctor. Centre d'Etudes sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage. University of Poitiers & CNRS (UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.

Alice Normand

Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive. University of Clermont Auvergne (UCA). France.

221/17401 Money issues exhaust low-income individuals’ selective attention

The present research demonstrates that the lower the individuals’ income the poorer their selective attention when they concurrently have to solve hard financial problems.

Normand Alice

Assistant Professor. Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive (CNRS; UMR 6024). University of Clermont Auvergne (UCA). Clermont-Ferrand. France

221/17402 Hidden (dis)advantage of Social Class: How Classroom Settings Reproduce Social Inequality by Staging Unfair Comparison

Three studies show that school contexts disrupt working-class students achievement by showcasing differences in students' performance in a way that does not acknowledge the reality that, due to their social background, certain students are already familiar with the academic standards.

GOUDEAU Sébastien

PhD, Post-doc. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage (CeRCA, University of Poitiers & CNRS, UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.

Croizet Jean-Claude

Professor. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage (CeRCA, University of Poitiers & CNRS, UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.

221/17403 Social-class (dis)advantage in assessment: How evaluators favor high-SES pupils

We investigated the social class (dis)advantage in assessment. Study 1 showed that evaluators artificially re-created the existing social class achievement gap when grading identical tests. Study 2 showed that evaluators favor high-SES over low-SES pupils by providing more positive feedbacks.

Autin Frédérique

Assistant Professor. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage (CeRCA, University of Poitiers & CNRS, UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.

Batruch Anatolia

PhD student. Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne (UNIL). Lausanne. Switzerland

Butera Fabrizio

Professor. Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne (UNIL). Lausanne. Switzerland

221/17404 A Privilege Lens: Merit and Maintenance Concerns Underlying Class-Based Behavior

A privilege lens suggests that social class elicits both merit and maintenance motivations; in tension, these shape beliefs and behavior. Across five experiments, the advantaged bolster personal merit claims, but fail to relinquish privilege itself, when faced with class-privilege evidence.

Phillips Taylor

Assistant Professor. School of Business. New York University Stern. NY. USA

221/17405 Income Inequality, Perceived Competitiveness, and Approach-Avoidance Motivation

Income inequality makes economic stratification salient, and therefore promotes perceived competitiveness, which itself promotes approach and avoidance motivation. Across three studies, local income inequality was found to be a positive predictor—via perceived competitiveness—to approach- and avoidance-related motivational constructs.

Sommet Nicolas

PhD, Post-doc. University of Rochester, NY, USA. University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Elliot Andrew

Professor. University of Rochester, NY, USA.

Jamieson Jeremy

Assistant Professor. University of Rochester, NY, USA.

Butera Fabrizio

Professor. Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne (UNIL). Lausanne. Switzerland

11.10 - 12.50 h. Blitz: Presentations II

Session 3: Helping, cooperation, and forgiveness

Room: Albéniz

221/1664 Numinous constructs and helping behavior

In a series of four experiments activation of religiosity-related thoughts increased willingness to help in-groups, and decreased willingness to help out-groups, and activation of spirituality-related thoughts increased willingness to help in-groups, and didn’t decrease willingness to help out-groups.

Piotrowski Jarosław

Psychologist. Professor. Poznań Faculty at University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland.

Żemojtel-Piotrowska Magdalena

Psychologist. Professor. Social Sciences Faculty, Gdańsk University, Gdańsk, Poland

221/20203 With a little help from my friends – Socialising and adaptation to university

Using a mobile app, 118 students reported their behaviours and emotional states four times daily, over the course of two weeks mid-year and two weeks during exam time. Students who socialized more reported higher wellbeing, less stress and less homesickness.

Sandrine Müller

PhD student. Psychology Department. University of Cambridge. Cambridge. U.K.

Peter J Rentfrow

Reader. Department of Psychology. University of Cambridge. Cambridge. U.K.

221/1454 Conformity pressures facilitate subgroup formation: the co-evolution of friendships and interpersonal perceptions in closed communities

How does social influence alter interpersonal relations? We model the co-evolution of interpersonal perceptions and friendships in a large longitudinal social network dataset of high-school classrooms. Results show that social influence and relationship formation occur simultaneously and affect group structure.

András Vörös

Postdoctoral research fellow. Chair of Social Networks. ETH Zürich. Zürich. Switzerland.

221/1312 Effects of pre-teen sexualization on peers’ helping intention in cases of a bullying episode

The present study examined the influence of pre-teen sexualization on peers’ helping intention in cases of a bullying episode. Attribution of moral patiency mediates the negative relation between sexualization and children’s willingness to help the victim.

Federica Spaccatini

PhD student in social psychology. Department of Scienze Politiche (Political Science).University of Perugia. Perugia. Italy.

Maria Giuseppina Pacilli

Associate Professor. Department of Political Science. University of Perugia. Perugia. Italy.

Carlo Tomasetto

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Bologna. Bologna. Italy.

221/1114 On the pros and cons of strategic outgroup helping

Is strategic outgroup helping sinister, or sane? Strategic outgroup helping is driven by the needs of the ingroup rather than those of the outgroup. Should we only promote outgroup helping when the helper has nothing to gain from the interaction?

Esther van Leeuwen

Psychologist. Department of Social and Organisational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands.

221/1171 Unbounded Indirect Reciprocity: Is Reputation-Based Cooperation Bounded by Group Membership?

Across three studies we advance the idea that reputation mechanisms can operate to promote cooperation also with outgroup members. We test this hypothesis compared to alternative hypotheses provided by social identity theory and bounded generalized reciprocity.

Angelo Romano

University of Turin & Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Daniel Balliet

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Junhui Wu

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

221/1742 Is intragroup communality inclusive?

This research examines how intragroup communality shapes attitudes towards newcomers. Results show an ambivalent role of very close intragroup relations: on the one hand they promote intergroup solidarity, yet on the other hand strengthen outgroup exclusion by increasing social distance.

Maciej Sekerdej

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.

Sven Waldzus

Psychologist. Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL). Lisbon. Portugal

221/1160 Target Social Class Shapes Prosociality: The Mediating Roles of Fairness, Compassion and Target Characteristics

We tested how target social class shapes prosociality in perceivers. We found that lower-class targets elicited higher prosociality relative to middle- and/or higher-class targets, regardless of self social class. This effect was mediated by perceptions of deservedness and compassion.

Ana Leal

PhD Student. Department of Social Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Teun Rookus

Medical Assistant Coordinator. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Niels J. Van Doesum

Assistant Professor. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands

221/1375 The role of social distance on cooperation: Does self-other overlap hinder ‘rational’ decisions?

We suggested a cognitive computational bias as an explanation for trust and cooperation with close others. Two experiments demonstrated that interacting with close others hinders information processing during economic money allocation games.

Nesibe Pinar Ugurlar

Ph.D. Candidate. Psychology Department. Middle East Technical University. Ankara.Turkey

Ann-Christin Posten

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany

221/1105 Father forgive them: The effect of the crucifix on forgiveness

In two studies we examined the effect of priming the crucifix on forgiveness. The crucifix was primed by showing a crucifix on the cover of a questionnaire. In both studies, the crucifix enhanced forgiveness, as assessed with two different scales.

Giulio Boccato

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. University of Bergamo. Bergamo. Italy

Giorgia Paleari

Psychologist. Professor. University of Bergamo. Bergamo. Italy

Dora Capozza

Psychologist. Professor. University of Padova. Padova. Italy.

221/1255 Blind For the Other Side – Victims’ Increased Self-Focus Decreases Willingness to Reconcile

We propose that interpersonal conflicts will cause differences in self-other focus among perpetrators and victims. Results from two studies confirmed that, due to their stronger other orientation, perpetrators reported more willingness to reconcile than victims.

Markus Barth

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Leipzig, Germany

Birte Siem

Psychologist, Institutes of Psychology, University of Hagen, Germany

Session 4: Social judgment and decision making

Room: Machado

221/1064 Decision-making Ability Beliefs

The Decision-making Ability Beliefs (DAB) scale assessed post-choice satisfaction in a 2AFC paradigm. Two subscales, speeded and deliberative, were identified by factor analysis. Analyses demonstrated individuals who perceived themselves to possess higher self-efficacy in specific contexts demonstrate higher post-choice satisfaction.

Nicholas O'Dell

The Ohio State University

Jeremy Gretton

The Ohio State University

Duane Wegener

The Ohio State University

221/1267 Malleability of incremental beliefs of intelligence – How to carry out an intervention… badly

Using Dweck et al.’s (1995) mindset theory, a cluster randomized controlled trial classroom experiment was carried out among 55 Hungarian students. In short term, IQ and personality growth mindset beliefs increased and amotivation decreased, after two months these changes disappeared.

Gábor Orosz

Social psychologist, assistant professor, Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary; Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences,

Szilvia Péter-Szarka

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary

Beáta Bőthe

Psychologist, Doctoral School of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

István Tóth-Király

Psychologist, Doctoral School of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

Rony Berger

Psychologist, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Tel Aviv, Israel

221/1739 When You Look at Me, I Lose My Metacognition: Feeling Observed Reduces Reliance on Metacognitive Experience

Our research demonstrates that when people feel observed by others, they rely on their metacognitive experience less than when they feel as the observers. Moreover, we found that feeling observed does not lessen the metacognitive experience itself, but rather affects its usage as a relevant source of information.

Tom Noah

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Yaacov Schul

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Ruth Mayo

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

221/1671 Evidence for a generalized truth-bias.

The truth-bias is often studied relative to cognitive-load. We found that participants tend to misremember false statements as true and to be influenced in their judgments by false statements, regardless of cognitive-load. Our results suggest a generalized truth-bias.

Myrto Pantazi

Psycholoigst. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. Faculté des Sciences Psychologiques et de l'Éducation. Université Libre de Bruxelles: Brussels: Belgium

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

Mikhail Kissine

Linguist. Professor. Centre de recherche en Linguistique LaDicso. Faculté de Lettres, Traduction et Communication. Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium

221/1523 Subtle Bias Correction

We introduce a subtle way of inducing bias correction based on math operations. We found that credible sources were more persuasive than non-credible ones for participants in the adding compared to those in the subtracting condition math conditions.  

Borja Paredes Sansinenea

Madrid

Pablo Briñol

Tenure Professor, Department of Social Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Richard Petty

Tenure Professor, Department of Social Psychology, The Ohio State University

221/1876 The Effects of Relative versus Absolute Ratings on Observers' Evaluations of Innocent Victims

Across 3 studies, participants rated innocent victims less favorably when they made their ratings in relative (e.g., relative to the self, the “average student”) versus absolute terms.

Mitchell Callan

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Essex. Colchester. United Kingdom

Rael Dawtry

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Essex. Colchester. United Kingdom

Annelie Harvey

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Anglia Ruskin University. Cambridge. United Kingdom

James Olson

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Western Ontario. London. Canada.

221/1586 When is he nicer? Temporal asymmetries in trait inference

Result from two studies suggest that the certainty associated to the past leads people to draw more extreme trait inferences from past behaviors than from future behaviors, but this effect is reversed when behaviors are negative and intentionally ambiguous.

João Braga

Pos-Doc Researcher, Faculty of Psychology, University of Lisbon. Faculty of Human Sciences, Universidade Católica Portuguesa. Portugal

Sofia Jacinto

PhD Student, Research Center for Psychological Science, Faculdade de Psicologia da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, IN, USA

Diana Orghian

PhD Student, Research Center for Psychological Science, Faculdade de Psicologia da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, and Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA

221/1509 Similarity testing increases automatic imitation

Individuals automatically imitate others. However, sometimes this tendency is decreased. In two studies we tested a possible explanation and found that when focusing on dissimilarities, individuals less strongly imitative others as when focusing on similarities.

Oliver Genschow

University of Cologne

Emiel Cracco

Ghent University

Marcel Brass

Ghent University

Thomas Mussweiler

London Business School

221/1526 Vertical Power Locations: On the Bi-Directional Link between Power and High Floors

We examine the bi-directional link between power and high-floor location within a building. Powerful (vs. powerless) individuals are perceived to reside (Study 1) and work (Study 2) on higher floors. Working on higher (vs. lower) floors signals power (Study 3).

Anna Dorfman

Psychologist, Post Doctoral fellow, Recanati Business School, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Daniel Heller

Professor. Recanati Business School. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel

Danny Ben-Shahar

Professor. Recanati Business School. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel

221/1092 Power motivates interpersonal behavior within a power-dyad

Power has generally been shown to decrease interpersonal interest. We show that power has opposite effects when connecting the dependent variables (social distance, perspective-taking, empathy and helping behavior) to the power-relationship so that it measures interpersonal interest towards the power-opponent.

Dirkje Pril

Psychology PhD-student. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Cologne. Germany

Joris Lammers

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/1162 No power to the people: How having no power makes people better communicators

Having power (vs. no power and control) leads to less accurate estimations of the effectiveness of one’s communication of ambiguous statements. Three experiments examine this effect for speakers and listeners using the speaker’s overestimation paradigm.

Bjarne Schmalbach

Psychologist. PhD Student. Department of Psychology. University of Münster. Münster. Germany.

René Kopietz

Psychologist. PhD. Department of Psychology. University of Münster. Münster. Germany.

Ana Guinote

Psychologist. PhD. Division of Psychology & Language Sciences. University College London. London. United Kingdom.

Gerald Echterhoff

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Münster. Münster. Germany.

221/1872 Agency, communion and the personality-performance relationship: does the competitiveness of the context matter ?

Two studies showed that personality self-descriptions are related to subjective performance through their agentic and communal components, depending on the competitiveness of the context. Performance was related with agentic-extraversion when competitiveness was high and with communal-extraversion when competitiveness was low.

Sylvain Caruana

Associate Professor. Cognition Health Socialization Laboratory. University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, France

Regis Lefeuvre

Associate Professor. Cognition Health Socialization Laboratory. University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, France

Patrick Mollaret

Full Professor. Parisian Laboratory of Social Psychology, University of Paris 8, France

221/1629 When less is better than more: Preferring equity over efficiency in allocation decisions

When allocating resources, people sometimes prefer equity over efficiency. However, our findings suggest that people refute the personal responsibility of determining how inequity will be implemented, and not inequity in itself. That is, participants display inequity responsibility aversion.

Tom Gordon-Hecker

Psychologist. PhD candidate. Psychology department. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Be'er-Sheva. Israel

Daniela Rosensaft

Psychologist. Psychology department. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Be'er-Sheva. Israel

Andrea Pittarello

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Psychology department. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands

Shaul Shalvi

Psychologist. Associate Professor. CREED, Faculty of Economics & Business. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands

Yoella Bereby-Meyer

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Psychology department. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Be'er-Sheva. Israel

13.00 - 14.30 h. Seated Lunch

14.30 - 16.10 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions III

221/39 - Getting things done: New findings on reducing the intention-behaviour gap

Room: Manuel Falla

This symposium points to new research showing that the intention-behaviour gap does not need to be accepted as a given. We will describe aspects of the situation and person and self-regulatory strategies that affect the width of this gap.

Chair:

Thomas Webb

Reader in Psychology. Department of Psychology. The University of Sheffield. Sheffield. United Kingdom.

221/3901 Translating intentions into health actions: the role of motivational coherence

Motivational coherence moderated relations between intentions and subsequent behaviour in three studies. Participants were more likely to realize their intentions to breastfeed, exercise, and avoid smoking, when desirability, feasibility, and normative considerations all pointed in the same direction.

Paschal Sheeran

Professor. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill. US

Mark Conner

Professor. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK

221/3902 Effortless self-control for successfully operating on goals

Three studies examined how trait self-control affects self-regulation success, showing that high levels of trait self-control were associated with early identification of a self-control dilemma allowing for better handling of such a dilemma rather than effortful inhibition of unwanted responses.

Denise de Ridder

Professor. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Marleen Gillebaart

Assistant Professor. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Anouk van der Weiden

Postdoc. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Jeroen Benjamins

Assistant Professor. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/3903 Mental contrasting turns us into caretakers of ourselves

Mental contrasting (MC) closes the intention-behaviour gap by fostering motivationally intelligent goal pursuit: People choose and strive for futures that are desirable and feasible, allowing them to take care of themselves during everyday life and stressful times.

Gabriele Oettingen

Professor. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. US

Bettina Schwörer

Dr. Institute for Psychology. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.

K. Michael Reininger

Dr. Institute for Psychology. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.

221/3904 Understanding different ways of monitoring goal progress and their impact on goal attainment

We present a taxonomy of the different ways that people can monitor their goal progress and use meta-analysis to identify their effects on goal attainment. Progress monitoring had a medium-to-large effect on goal attainment (d+ = 0.40) across 138 studies.

Thomas Webb

Reader in Psychology. Department of Psychology. The University of Sheffield. Sheffield. UK

Benjamin Harkin

Dr. Department of Psychology. The University of Sheffield. Sheffield. UK

Betty Chang

Dr. Center for Research in Cognition & Neurosciences. Universite Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels, Belgium.

Andrew Prestwich

Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK.

Mark Conner

Professor. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK.

Ian Kellar

Associate Professor of Health Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK.

Yael Benn

Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Manchester Metropolitan University. Manchester. UK

221/3905 Enhancing group decisions via if–then planning

Group performance is handicapped when group members fail to share task-relevant information and when groups fail to disengage from faulty goal pursuit. In four experiments, groups could overcome these problems by furnishing their goals to perform well with if-then plans.

Peter Gollwitzer

Professor. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. US

J. Lukas Thürmer

Interim Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Konstanz. Konstanz. Germany.

Frank Wieber

Dr. Department of Psychology. University of Konstanz. Konstanz. Germany.

221/88 - Passion for knowledge: Emotional processes in the face of epistemic challenge.

Room: Machuca

We focus on knowledge emotions (curiosity, surprise, interest, boredom, doubt and confusion) and how they regulate reactions to our complex and surprising world. We discuss how and why these emotions arise, and what consequences they have for individual functioning.

Chair:

Malgorzata Goclowska

Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Netherlands.

221/8801 Individual Differences in Epistemic Curiosity and Self-Regulation: At the Intersection of Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation

Epistemic Curiosity (EC) has two dimensions: Interest (I) type and Deprivation (D) type. I-type EC is associated with positive affect and optimism regarding knowledge discovery; D-type EC involves a bothersome “need-to-know” that underlies caution, deliberation and judiciousness in knowledge-seeking behavior.

Jordan Litman

St. Leo University & the Institute of Human and Machine Cognition Florida, USA

221/8802 Curiosity and time: From not knowing to almost knowing.

Time is a key factor in the subjective experience of curiosity. When the time to the resolution of curiosity is long (versus short), the positive anticipation of the resolution is relatively weak and negative feelings of lacking information become stronger.

Marret Noordewier

Social and Organizational Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

Eric Van Dijk

Social and Organizational Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

221/8803 Why schema-violations are sometimes preferable to schema-consistencies: The role of interest and openness to experience.

Two opposing appraisals regulate reactions to schema-violations. Schema-violations are surprising (to most individuals), decreasing approach intentions, but (in those higher in openness to experience) they are simultaneously seen as more interesting, increasing approach intentions.

Malgorzata Goclowska

Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Matthijs Baas

Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Andrew Elliot

Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, USA

Carsten K.W. De Dreu

Social and Organizational Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

221/8804 Finding Meaning in Ideology: Going to Political Extremes in Response to Boredom.

Boredom triggers a search for meaning. Political ideology can give a sense of purpose. We found that boredom results in more extreme political orientations (Study 1 & 2), and that the search for meaning mediated this association (Study 3).

Wijnand Van Tilburg

Department of Psychology, King’s College London, London, UK

Eric Igou

Psychology Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

221/8805 Lost and Found: Identifying and Distinguishing Forms of Epistemic Negative Affect

Epistemic negative affect has generally been underexplored. Across three studies, we modelled the interrelations of 18 negative affective states. Each study revealed remarkably similar two-dimensional models that help elucidate the epistemic nature of some versus other negative affective states.

Paul Maher

Psychology Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

Wijnand Van Tilburg

Department of Psychology, King’s College London, London, UK

Eric Igou

Psychology Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

221/195 - The positive and negative effects of social diversity: Explaining its impact on individuals and groups

Room: Picasso

This symposium brings together research exploring the processes underlying the effects of social diversity (e.g., ethnic heterogeneity) for societies and their individuals. The presentations identify perceived threat and intergroup contact experiences as two of the most critical processes.

Chair:

Miguel Ramos

Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. United Kingdom.

221/19501 The impact of changes in ethnic diversity for subjective well-being

This longitudinal cross-country study investigated whether changes in ethnic diversity impact individual well-being. Results showed that diversity can lead to both positive and negative well-being outcomes. Perceived threat and positive intergroup contact were used to explain these effects.

Miguel Ramos

Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK

Matthew Bennett

Sociologist. Department of Sociology. University of Birmingham. Birmingham. UK

Miles Hewstone

Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK

221/19502 Can positive intergroup contact reduce prejudice in negative intergroup contexts?

Using individual-level and multi-level survey data from different intergroup contexts across Europe, we tested, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally, whether positive intergroup contact can reduce prejudice in negative (relative to positive) intergroup climates.

Kristof Dhont

Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

Alain van Hiel

Psychologist. Dept. of Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology. Ghent University. Ghent. Belgium

Oliver Christ

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Hagen. Hagen. Germany

Katharina Schmid

Psychologist. ESADE Business School. Ramon Llull University. Barcelona. Spain

Ralf Wölfer

Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK

Simon Lolliot

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada

Frank Asbrock

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. TU Chemnitz. Chemnitz. Germany

221/19503 Are diverse societies less cohesive? Advancing public policy responses to ethnic diversity

The current research examines competing theories related to social cohesion and ethnic diversity (i.e., contact, extended contact, and constrict theories), while also exploring predictors of social cohesion to advance public policy responses to ethnic diversity.

Kathleen Klik

Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia

Katherine Reynolds

Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia

Sarah McKenna

Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia

Eunro Lee

Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia

Miles Hewstone

Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK

Andrew Markus

Historian. School of Historical Studies. Monash University. Melbourne. Australia

221/19504 Perceiving demographic diversity as a threat: Effects of interethnic ideologies

Majority group members primed with multiculturalism perceived more threat and become more politically conservative after learning they will soon be in the minority. These effects were not found among those primed with colorblindness or polyculturalism.

Hannah Osborn

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ohio University. Athens. US

Kimberly Rios

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ohio University. Athens. US

221/19505 Managing diversity at the workplace: Can affirmative action policies increase interest in leadership positions?

This research investigates the effectiveness of different types of affirmative action policies for managing diversity at the workplace. Results showed that certain preferential treatment policies increase minorities’ intentions to apply, by increasing their perceived fit for leadership positions.

Christa Nater

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern. Switzerland

Sabine Sczesny

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern. Switzerland

221/197 - Advances in theory and research on agency/competence and communion/warmth

Room: Dinner 1

Agency/competence and communion/warmth are the two fundamental content dimensions of social perception, figuring prominently in most areas of social psychology. This symposium brings together latest theory-advancing research on the topic, making use of latest research designs and methods.

Chair:

Jennifer Eck

Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

221/19701 Self-presentation trade-offs: Status drives a competence downshift and (sometimes) a warmth upshift

Using the Stereotype Content Model, in the context of warmth-competence compensation, several of our studies show a status-tradeoff effect: Higher-status speakers convey less competence; lower-status speakers convey more competence. Sometimes warmth shows the inverse. Recent data extend these results.

Susan T. Fiske

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.

Jillian K. Swencionis

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.

Cydney H. Dupree

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.

221/19702 Negative gossip about agency affects a target’s self-concept, negative gossip about communion leads to reputation worries

Negative gossip about a target can be distinguished into agency-related (lack of assertiveness) vs. communion-related (lack of empathy). We present an extended Dual Perspective Model that deals with the impact of agency-related vs. communion-related negative gossip on the target’s self-view.

Andrea Abele Brehm

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Erlangen. Germany.

Nicole Hauke

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Erlangen. Germany

221/19703 Agentic and communal rhetoric in the quest for political popularity

Communal rhetoric can help politicians boost their public approval. A text analysis of the 123 millions words spoken in U.S. Congress shows that the prevalence of communal words strongly predicts how the public feels about Congress six months later.

Ari Decter-Frain

London School of Economics. UK

Jeremy A. Frimer

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Winnipeg. Winnipeg. Canada.

221/19704 Can communal life-orientations quiet the ego? The cases of East-Asian culture, Christianity, and mind-body exercises

A communal life-orientation is often described as an antidote to self-enhancement. This idea was examined for three prominent instantiations of a communal life-orientation: East-Asian culture, Christian religion, mind-body exercises. Supporting self-enhancement’s universality, results revealed higher—rather than lower—communal self-enhancement.

Jochen Gebauer

Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

221/19705 The role of sociocultural norms in agency and communion effects

The Sociocultural Motives Perspective (SMP) predicts that agency/communion effects on behavior depend on ambient sociocultural norms. We buttress SMP-predictions across different types of norms (descriptive, injunctive, and wisdom-of-the-crowd norms), using a novel experimental paradigm that allows for causal inferences.

Jennifer Eck

Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

Jochen E. Gebauer

Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

221/71 - I'm feeling us: The development, management, and consequences of emotions in groups

Room: Dinner 2

Intragroup processes are drenched with emotions. In this symposium, a comprehensive set of papers addresses the development, regulation, and consequences of emotions in groups within a variety of settings (i.e., education, sport, work).

Chairs:

Astrid C. Homan

Psychologist. Professor. Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Marc W. Heerdink

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Svenja A. Wolf

Sport Scientist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/7101 Emotional conformity: A theoretical framework to explain emotional convergence in groups

In this theoretical talk, we present the Emotional Conformity Framework, an explanation of emotional convergence in groups. Drawing upon conformity theory, the Framework emphasizes members’ underlying convergence motives, integrates research on convergence mechanisms, and generates an agenda for future work.

Svenja A. Wolf

Sport Scientist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Gerben A. van Kleef

Psychologist. Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Marc W. Heerdink

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/7102 Leader interpersonal emotion regulation influences affective dynamics and innovation in teams

This study explored the effects of interpersonal emotion regulation on group dynamics. A field study of Chilean management teams revealed that leaders’ attempts to manage their team members’ emotions predicted team innovation as a result of team affective tone.

Karen Niven

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Alliance Manchester Business School. University of Manchester. UK.

Hector Madrid

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Business and Management School. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Chile.

221/7103 Social support and interpersonal emotion regulation among varsity athletes

This study explored social support and interpersonal emotion regulation in sport. Data from two time points indicated that athletes who perceived greater support from teammates were more likely to improve their own emotions and the emotions of their teammates.

Katherine Tamminen

Sport Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education. University of Toronto. Toronto. Canada.

Ben Schellenberg

Psychologist. Postdoctoral Fellow. School of Psychology. University of Ottawa. Ottawa. Canada.

Tess Palmateer

Sport Psychologist. Doctoral Student. University of North Texas. Denton. USA.

221/7104 Regulating emotions and emergent leadership

Emotional regulation and emergent leadership were tested using student groups. Self-report emotional regulation was related to teammates' assessment of creating positive emotions and to emergent leadership. Self-report interpersonal emotional regulation was not related to group emotion nor to emergent leadership.

Arik Cheshin

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Human Service. University of Haifa. Haifa. Israel.

Gil Luria

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Human Service. University of Haifa. Haifa, Israel.

221/7105 The positive side of specific negative group affective states: Pre-task anxiety boosts group performance

Does the way group members feel about a task affect their performance? We investigated the effects of specific feelings about group assignments on the performance of student groups and find that higher anxiety and higher positivity both increase performance.

Marc W. Heerdink

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Astrid C. Homan

Astrid C. Homan, Psychologist. Professor. Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

221/96 - Two sides of the same medal: Deception, its detection by, and consequences for others

Room: Andalucía III

People readily deceive others. In this symposium, we focus on different types of deception, how deception and (un)trustworthiness can be inferred and how a resulting mindset of distrust influences cognitive accessibility, abstraction abilities, and social comparison.

Chair:

Corinna Michels

Psychologist. PhD Student. Department Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/9601 Practice makes lies more perfect and honesty less perfect

We provide evidence for a decreased ability to determine whether rehearsed statements are true or false. We show that rehearsed lies are as difficult to catch as spontaneous lies, whereas rehearsed truths are more difficult to catch than spontaneous truths.

Ilja van Beest

Tilburg University, Netherlands.

Anna van 't Veer

Leiden University, Netherlands

Marielle Stel

University of Twente, Netherlands

221/9602 Determinants of impressions of trustworthiness from faces

People form instantaneous impressions of trustworthiness from faces and agree in these impressions. But what determines these impressions? I will discuss perceptual (configurations of facial features) and non-perceptual determinants (statistical and idiosyncratic learning) of these impressions.

Alexander Todorov

Princeton University, USA

221/9603 Accessibility is a matter of trust: Dispositional and contextual distrust blocks accessibility effects

Five studies demonstrate that distrust, both as a chronic disposition and as a contextual factor, activate the alternatives to the original accessible concept thus undermining the preeminence of the prime and blocking both verbal and non-verbal accessibility effects.

Ruth Mayo

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Tali Kleiman

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Noa Sher

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Andrey Elster

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

221/9604 When trust leads to ‘non-social’ integration: Trust fosters information integration

Trust fosters not only social integration, but also how individuals integrate (non-social) information into coherent mental representations. Five studies show that trust improves knowledge organization by enhancing structural perception and the formation of abstractions through a focus on similarities.

Ann-Christin Posten

University of Cologne, Germany

Francesca Gino

Harvard University, USA

221/9605 Consequences of deception: Distrusting others reduces social comparison

When distrusting others, information is processed in a non-routine manner. In two studies we showed that this also holds for social comparison information. After recalling a situation of distrust (vs. trust) participants engaged in fewer social comparisons.

Corinna Michels

University of Cologne, Germany

Pascal Burgmer

University of Cologne, Germany

Thomas Mussweiler

London Business School, UK

221/98 - Implicit evaluations: How they change and what they do to close relationships

Room: Andalucía II

To better understand romantic relationships, it is important to go beyond explicit evaluations. The present symposium focuses on the assessment of implicit evaluations and on their impact to understand, and predict relationship processes above and beyond explicit evaluations.

Chair:

Francesca Righetti

Assistant Professor. Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology. VU Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

221/9801 Implicit attitudes can shift to match the ones of a potential romantic partner

Three studies provide evidence that when people are actively pursuing (but have not yet successfully initiated a relationship with) another person, their implicit attitudes shift, in the moment, to align with that person’s attitudes

Margaret Clark

Yale University

David Melnikoff

Yale University

Katherine Von Culin

Yale University

John Bargh

Yale University

221/9802 Specifically aware, globally biased: Specific perceptions predict automatic partner evaluations better than do global evaluations

We used two samples of newlywed couples to demonstrate that spouses’ perceptions of their specific marital problems reflect their automatic partner attitudes in ways that their explicit global evaluations do not.

Andrea Meltzer

Florida State University

Lindsey Hicks

Florida State University

James McNulty

Florida State University

221/9803 The Heat Is On ... or Maybe Not: Implicit Sexual Desire in Romantic Couples

A new measure of implicit sexual desire for one's partner predicted greater desire and arousal during sex, and perceiving that partners were more responsive and felt more desire. Implicit sexual desire also helps inoculate women against attractive alternatives.

Harry Reis

University of Rochester

David de Jong

Western Carolina University

Gurit Birnbaum

Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya

221/9805 Can Evaluative Conditioning Be Used to Improve Marriage?

Married spouses who viewed their partners paired with positive stimuli demonstrated increased positive automatic partner evaluations relative to control spouses, and these automatic partner evaluations predicted changes in self-reported marital satisfaction over the eight-week course of the study.

James McNulty

Florida State University

Michael Olson

University of Tennessee

221/51 - Reasons for hope? Women’s reactions to gender stereotypes

Room: Seminar

We examine subtle cues that trigger implicit and explicit processes reinforcing gender stereotypes, but also counteracting them. Across five presentations, we investigate cultural and identity-based boundary conditions as well as potential interventions against the negative consequences of gender stereotypes.

Chair:

Soledad de Lemus Martín

Assistant Professor. Social Psychology Department. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

221/5101 The Activation of Negative Gender Stereotypes in Performance Situations Reduces Women’s Social Motivation

The present work shows in two experimental and one correlational study that activating negative stereotypes about women’s math abilities in performance situations decreases their social approach motivation. This effect is mediated by a reduced sense of belonging.

Sarah E. Martiny

UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Jana Nikitin

University of Basel, Germany

221/5102 Resisting Implicit Stereotypes through Evaluative and Behavioural Strategies.

Implicit stereotypes occur outside awareness, and it has been argued that, therefore, they cannot be resisted. We show that resistance is possible: those who identify strongly with feminists, but not women, resist implicit gender stereotypes through evaluative and behavioural strategies.

Jolien van Breen

University of Groningen, the Netherlands

Russell Spears

University of Groningen, the Netherlands

Toon Kuppens

University of Groningen, the Netherlands

Soledad de Lemus Martín

Universidad de Granada, Spain

221/5103 Exposure to hostile sexism and gender stereotypes triggers resistance amongst women.

We tested the role of ambivalent sexism in maintaining traditional gender roles. We found that women high in sexism perceive nontraditional woman negatively. However, exposure to sexism triggered women’s reactance and positive opinions towards gender equality.

Marta Szastok

Jagiellonian University, Poland

Małgorzata Kossowska

Jagiellonian University, Poland

221/5104 Which man is Better in Fat and Lean Times? Perception of communal and agentic men

In Study 1, students from less gender egalitarian countries had more gendered perceptions of communal men than students from more egalitarian countries. In Study 2 & 3, we showed that the perception of communal men depends on participants’ sociopolitical system.

Natasza Kosakowska-Berezecka

University of Gdańsk, Poland

Tomasz Besta

University of Gdańsk, Poland

Saba Safdar

University of Guelph, Canada

Paweł Jurek

University of Gdańsk, Poland

Gopa Bhardwaj

Galgotias University, India

221/5105 Female peers are “social vaccines” who protect women’s self-concept, persistence, and career aspirations in engineering

Contact with female peers serves as “social vaccines” for engineering women who face negative stereotypes about their ability. Having a critical mass of female peers in engineering teams or female peer mentors enhances belonging, confidence, retention, and careers across time.

Nilanjana Dasgupta

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA

221/68 - Contemporary theoretical approaches to Social Identity Theory, Peace & Conflict

Room: Andalucía I

The symposium brings together researchers to discuss theoretical advances, and new directions for research in Social Identity Theory (SIT) with a focus on the dynamic role of identity in mediating threats and conflict in increasingly multi-faith and multi-cultural societies.

Chair:

Neil Ferguson

Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. Liverpool Hope University. Liverpool. United Kingdom.

221/6801 Social categorisation, identity and acculturation: Processes underlying peace and conflict between groups

Identity and social categorisation processes help explain the (often challenging) majority and minority dynamics during acculturation. The talk aims to provide a framework that integrates categorisation with acculturation strategies, placing it in the context of current conflict in western societies.

Claudia Roscini

University of Greenwich, UK

Sofia Stathi

University of Greenwich, UK

Reeshma Haji

Laurentian University, Canada

221/6802 Social Identity Theory’s Self-Esteem Hypothesis: A Reformulation and an Extension

This theoretical talk discusses a reformulation and extension of social identity theory’s self-esteem hypothesis that predicts when and for whom self-esteem motivates ingroup favouritism and other forms of intergroup behaviour.

Mark Rubin

The University of Newcastle, Australia

Sarah E Martiny

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway

221/6803 Identity threat, anxious uncertainty, and reactive ingroup affirmation –how can antisocial outcomes be prevented?

Social identification may represent an effective defence mechanism against feelings of threat that may arise from violated psychological core motives. The talk focus on dispositional and situational factors that affect the direction of outcomes (i.e. pro- vs. antisocial).

Adrian Lüders

University of Salzburg, Austria

Eva Jonas

University of Salzburg, Austria

Immo Fritsche

University of Leipzig, Germany

Dimitrij Agroskin

University of Salzburg, Austria

221/9804 The hidden costs of sacrifice: Consequences for implicit partner evaluations

Sacrificing important preferences for one’s partner negatively affects implicit partner evaluations (i.e., more negative automatic affective reactions toward one’s partner), even when the explicit (i.e., self-reported) evaluations do not change.

Francesca Righetti

VU Amsterdam

Wilhelm Hofmann

University of Cologne

Tila Pronk

Tilburg University

Paul Van Lange

VU Amsterdam

14.30 - 16.10 h. Blitz: Presentations III

Session 5: Self-control

Room: Albéniz

221/1130 High self-controllers are pickier when selecting a partner: Findings from speeddating events

People with high self-control are generally good at maintaining a relationship, but are they also good in starting one? Current research showed that people with high self-control are more selective, but not more popular, during a speeddate event.

Tila Pronk

Assistant Professor. Social Psychology. Tilburg University. Tilburg. The Netherlands.

Jaap Denissen

Professor. Developmental Psychology. Tilburg University. Tilburg. The Netherlands.

Johan Karremans

Associate Professor. Social Psychology. Radboud University Nijmegen. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

Leander van der Meij

Assistant Professor. Social and Organizational Psychology. VU University Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Andrew Demetriou

Research Assistant. Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Delft University of Technology. Delft. The Netherlands.

221/1006 Me or us? Self-control promotes a healthy balance between personal and relationship concerns

Two studies among romantic couples showed that an individual’s self-control helps in balancing one’s dedication to both personal and relational concerns. In turn, successfully managing this balancing act seems an important mechanism by which self-control enhances personal and relationship well-being.

Mariko Lisa Visserman

VU Amsterdam

Francesca Righetti

VU Amsterdam

Madoka Kumashiro

Goldmiths, University of London

Paul Van Lange

VU Amsterdam

221/1752 Choosing what’s right when I feel like doing wrong: The influence of modeling on self-control

In a series of online studies, we tested the extent to which self-control can be improved by observing others mastering it. Results demonstrate that the simple observation of an unknown person exerts a pervasive effect on participants’ delay discounting choices.

Gayannee Kedia

Post-doctoral fellow, Psychology Department, University of Graz, Graz, Austria

Marc Scholten

Associate Professor, Research Unit on Cognitive, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Universidade Europeia of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

Katja Corcoran

Professor, Psychology Department, University of Graz, Graz, Austria

221/1261 With or without them: Improving self-control in juvenile offenders

Self-control is a keyfactor in rehabilitation. Thus, we tested mindfulness and the motivational effect of group identification on a standard self-control task in an sample of 57 incarcerated male youth. Both treatments led to higher self-control, than a control group.

Simon David Isemann

Psychologist. PhD Student. Department of Psychology. University of Trier. Trier. Germany

Ina M. Sroka

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Trier. Trier. Germany

Eva Walther

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Trier. Trier. Germany

221/1615 A meta-analysis of improving self-control with practice

To clarify whether self-control training is effective, we reviewed the literature on self-control training and conducted a meta-analysis of 29 published and unpublished experiments. We found a significant, small-to-medium effect of training on diverse outcomes relevant to health and well-being.

Joanne Beames

PhD/Clinical Masters Candidate. School of Psychology. University of New South Wales. Sydney. Australia.

Joanne Beames

PhD/Clinical Masters Candidate. School of Psychology. University of New South Wales. Sydney. Australia.

Timothy Schofield

Post Doctorate. Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia.

221/1680 Effortless self-control

We report two studies showing that habit partially mediates the effect of self-control on eating/ exercise behavior. These findings corroborate recent suggestions that effects of self-control may be particularly related to habits rather than the ability to exert effortful control.

Marieke Adriaanse

Utrecht University

221/1614 “Thou Shalt Kill”: Practicing self-control supports adherence to personal values when asked to aggress

We found that self-control training can increase or decrease aggression as a function of moral concern.

Thomas Denson

Social Psychologist. Associate Professor. School of Psychology. University of New South Wales. Sydney.

221/1485 My mobile = a temptation? Self-control predicts the ability to resist one’s mobile phone

People differ in their ability to resist the temptation to check their mobile phone. Two online studies and a laboratory study showed that this difference was related to self-control, personality and self-reported health behavior.

Anne Berthold

Department of Social Psychology, University of Zuerich

Sonja Heller

Department of Social Psychology, University of Zuerich, Switzerland

221/1324 The Influence of Trait Self-Control on Emotional Preferences in the Context of Self-Control Performance

What emotions do people with high trait self-control (HTSC) consider useful when expecting to exert self-control? We examined this question in two studies and found evidence that people with HTSC believe that different emotional states can improve or impair self-control.

Michelle Tornquist

PhD Student. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. UK.

Eleanor Miles

Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. UK.

221/1037 Ego- Depletion, Competition, and Self-Control

This study aims to explore the effect of ego-depletion and anticipating a competitive or cooperative task on self-regulation capacity. The findings reveal a depletion decreasing self-regulation capacity. Similarity was shown in the self-regulation of the two negotiation-perception types.

Matilda Kosta

Psychologist. PhD Student. Faculty of Medicine and Psychology. Sapienza University. Rome. Italy

Matilda Kosta

Psychologist. PhD Student. Faculty of Medicine and Psychology. Sapienza University. Rome. Italy

Mauro Giacomantonio

Psychologist. Researcher. Faculty of Medicine and Psychology. Sapienza University. Rome. Italy

221/1452 Torn: Emotional Reactions to the Experience of Self-control Conflict

Four studies showed that people feel negative about difficult or conflicted self-control choices (i.e., giving in AND resisting temptation). Resisting temptations only led to stronger feelings of pride once people appraised their (healthy food) choices as acts of self-control.

Daniela Becker

IWM Tübingen

Nils Jostmann

University of Amsterdam

Wilhelm Hofmann

University of Cologne

Rob Holland

University of Amsterdam, Radboud University Nijmegen

221/1117 Too tired for a reward: intense self-regulatory effort inhibits reward sensitivity

Two experiments tested whether heightened need to conserve energy following intense self-regulatory effort actively inhibit reward-seeking. Using pupil dilation, we found that intense self-regulatory effort reduces reward sensitivity only for “effortful” (e.g., sex) but not for “restorative” (e.g., food) rewards.

Mauro Giacomantonio

University of Rome

Jennifer Jordan

IMD, Lausanne, Switzerland

Bob Fennis

University of Groningen, Netherlands

Session 6: Gender and sexism

Room: Machado

221/11001 The effects of perspective-taking on recognition of institutionalized sexism.

Institutionalized sexism refers to institutional practices that subordinate women relative to men. Although institutionalized sexism often goes unrecognized, perspective-taking with a victim of institutionalized sexism increases accurate recognition of sexism among both men and women.

Laurie O'Brien

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA,USA

Stefanie Simon

Postdoctoral Fellow for Innovation in the Liberal Arts, Psychology, Carleton University, Northfield, Minnesota, USA

Meagan Magaldi

Department of Psychology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA,USA

221/11002 Women’s Labeling of Gender Discrimination: The Role of Perceived Shared Fate

Women tended to label an event as discrimination if they first described their similarities to women versus unique traits (Study 1), or labeled their experience in front of another woman who likely experienced similar versus different treatment (Study 2).

Donna M. Garcia

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, California State University - San Bernardino, San Bernardino CA, USA

Kamiya Stewart

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, California State University - San Bernardino, San Bernardino CA, USA

Nyla Branscombe

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KA, USA

221/11003 Benevolent sexism moderates women’s reactions to ingroup members’ support for confrontation

Three studies examine how benevolent sexism (BS) shapes support for ingroup members who confront sexism. BS was positively associated with support for responses that do not challenge the gender hierarchy, with lower BS women rejecting actions that support it.

Kimberly Kahn

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA

Manuela Barreto

Professor of Social and Organisational Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

Cheryl R. Kaiser

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle WA, USA

221/11005 Conflicting motivations: Understanding ingroup responses to low status member’s claimants of discrimination

Three studies examine how group identification(GID) and status legitimizing beliefs(SLB) interact to predict ingroup reactions to claims of discrimination. GID predicted liking and support for ingroup claimants among women and Latino Americans but not when SLBs were high or primed.

Joseph Wellman

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, California State University - San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, USA

Ellen E. Newell

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Wilkes University, Wilkes, PA, USA

Kamiya Stewart

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, California State University - San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, USA

221/1310 Gender differences and predictors of engaging in different types of action on behalf of women

Across two studies, we examine predictors of men’s and women’s willingness to engage in two behaviors on behalf of women: action that aims to challenge gender inequality (“feminist action”) and action that aims to protect women from violence (“protective action”).

Helena Radke

Social Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia

Fiona Kate Barlow

Social Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Matthew Hornsey

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/1265 Men’s need to feel chivalrous as a predictor for benevolent sexist behavior

Men often say that they behave benevolently sexist simply because women expect this behavior from them. We show that men behave benevolently sexist based on their attitudes and intrinsic motives but not because they believe that women expect benevolent behavior.

Nina Brückner

PhD student - University of Osnabrück

Julia Becker

Prof. Dr. Social Psychology - University of Osnabrück

221/1126 Are Men Hillary Clinton´s Weak Link? An Experimental Analysis of Men´s Resistance to Support Female Political Leaders

Drawing from leadership and gender research, this study examines men´s resistances to support female political leaders. In a series of MTurk experiments, findings show men´s limited disposition to vote for female candidates, identifying moderating and mediating effects.

Leire Gartzia

Deusto Business School, University of Deusto

Laura Kray

Haas School of Business, University of California Berkeley

221/1109 Put yourself in her shoes: The impact of sexual objectification on affective perspective taking

The inhibitory role of sexual objectification in perceivers’ affective-perspective taking was tested in two studies. Results showed that participants’ levels of affective-perspective taking were lower when processing sexualized than non-sexualized female targets. Findings were discussed within the sexual objectification frame.

Valentina Piccoli

Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Department of Life Sciences,University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy

Andrea Carnaghi

Associate professor in Social Psychology. Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste

Mauro Bianchi

senior researcher COPELABS, University Lusófona, Lisboa,Portugal

221/1340 The influence of gender-stereotypic comedy on women’s test performance: A big laugh?

Stereotyping media communication can elicit stereotype threat. The influence of gender-stereotypic comedy on women’s test performance was examined. The results show that test performance decreased when confronted with a gender-stereotypic media-stimulus in comparison to a non-threatening stimulus.

Silvana Weber

Psychologist. Institute for Communication and Media Psychology. University of Koblenz-Landau. Landau. Germany.

Markus Appel

Psychologist. Institute of Communicaiton and Media Psychology. University of Koblenz-Landau. Landau. Germany.

221/1749 Different attributions for employment success among women and men in STEM fields.

Despite no differences in math skills, women hold less STEM-related jobs and have lower incomes than men. Research conducted among STEM-graduates shows that women more often attribute their employment to motivation and social skills whereas men focus on professional qualifications.

Joanna Pyrkosz-Pacyna

PhD. Faculty of Humanities. AGH University of Science and Technology. Kraków. Poland

Katarzyna Jasko

PhD. Jagiellonian University. Kraków. Poland.

221/1756 The Effect of Experiencing a Gender Identity Threat on Subsequent Food Choices

When making hypothetical dinner choices from a restaurant menu, participants whose masculinity was threatened chose more masculine and less healthy foods than participants in the affirmation or control condition. Women whose femininity was threatened chose more feminine, and healthier, foods.

Kasia Banas

Psychologist. Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Emily Newman

Lecturer, School of Health in Social Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

Kara Murray

Student, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

Olga Szewczyk

Student, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

Tess Davis

Student, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

221/1568 Are attitudes towards economic and gender inequality related?

In this presentation we examined whether attitudes towards economic inequality and gender inequality are related. We found that concerns about economic inequality are related to gender system justification.

Eva Moreno Bella

Ph.D. Student. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

Miguel Moya Morales

Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

Guillermo B. Willis

Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

16.10 - 16.40 h. Coffee Break

16.40 - 18.20 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions IV

221/70 - Psychological distance, level of construal, and embodiment

Room: Manuel Falla

Five talks highlight the mutual influence of construal level (CL), psychological distance, and embodied processes. We show, for instance, how CL is embodied, how distance affects emotion perception, how mouth movements influence distance-related motivations, and that CL affects multi-sensory integration.

Chair:

Jochim Hansen

Psychologist. Deprtment of Psychology. University of Salzburg. Salzburg. Austria.

Discussant:

Yaacov Trope

Psychologist. Professor. New York University. New York. United States

221/7001 Perceptual simulation of space along the vertical dimension as embodiment of psychological distance and CL

In three studies we examined the hypothesis that the various dimensions of psychological distance and that construal level are mentally simulated along a vertical dimension, such that psychologically distant or abstract is ‘up’ and psychologically near or concrete is ‘down’.

Ravit Nussinson

Psychologist. Education and Psychology Department. The Open University of Haifa. Haifa. Isreal

Yaron Elias

Psychologist. Education and Psychology Department. The Open University of Haifa. Haifa. Isreal

Nurit Gronau

Psychologist. Education and Psychology Department. The Open University of Haifa. Haifa. Isreal

221/7002 Psychological incorporation: Oral distance-reduction leads to approach motivation

Words were construed for which the consonantal articulation spots wandered either front to back (e.g., BAKA, inward) or reversed (e.g., KABA, outward). Because inward articulation resembles ingestion movements, inward words were preferred over outward words.

Sascha Topolinski

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany

221/7003 Psychological distance promotes perception of pride in other’s smiles

When seeing smiles people perceived more happiness than pride when temporally close, whereas they perceived more pride than happiness when temporally distant. Pride ratings mediated influences of psychological distance on perceptions of organizational status and politeness towards the smiling other.

Janet Wessler

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Saarland. Saarbrücken. Germany.

Jochim Hansen

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Salzburg. Salzburg. Austria.

221/7004 Arousal and cognitive processing

In three studies, we tested whether physiological arousal modulated cognitive processing. We hypothesized that high arousal should trigger concrete, bottom-up processing, while low arousal should trigger abstract, top-down processing. We found no evidence for the influence of arousal on processing.

Hans Alves

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Filipa Almeida

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Lisbon. Lisbon. Portugal.

Olga Bialobrzeska

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Social Sciences and Humanities Warsaw. Warsaw. Poland

Sandra Godinho

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Lisbon University ISCTE-IUL. Lisbon. Portugal.

Marília Prada

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Lisbon University ISCTE-IUL. Lisbon. Portugal.

221/7005 Construal level and multi-sensory integration: High-level construal increases the influence of vision on taste judgments

Two studies tested whether construal level moderates color influences on taste perception. Under high-level construal, energy drinks in yellow (versus blue) cups were perceived as sourer (Study 1) and water in blue (versus yellow) cups as more refreshing (Study 2).

Jochim Hansen

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Salzburg. Salzburg. Austria.

221/133 - Putting emotions in context: How the effects of expressing and regulating emotions change across situations

Room: Machuca

Context is often overlooked in research on emotion regulation and expression, but plays a vital role in understanding these phenomena. This symposium showcases emerging research investigating context across diverse domains, demonstrating the key role context plays in emotion processes.

Chair:

Elise K. Kalokerinos

Postdoctoral Fellow. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. KU Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/13301 Social context moderates the impact of emotional expressions in mixed-motive games

People’s decisions in resource dilemmas are influenced by others’ emotional displays about such decisions. We show that the context in which others’ emotional expressions are observed moderates their effects on perceivers’ decision-making, in both interpersonal and intergroup settings.

Antony Manstead

Professor, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales

Magdalena Rychlowska

Research Associate, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales

Job van der Schalk

Lecturer, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales

221/13302 Contextual influences on emotional persuasion: The roles of message framing, emotion relevance, and information processing

People use others’ emotional expressions to inform their own attitudes, depending on the social context. Happy expressions engender positive attitudes in positively-framed messages, but negative attitudes in negatively-framed messages. Effects are mitigated under cognitive load and when emotions seem irrelevant.

Gerben A. van Kleef

Professor, Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Marc W. Heerdink

Assistant Professor, Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Helma van den Berg

Human Behaviour Specialist, TNO – Human Behavior and Organizational Innovations, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

221/13303 Exploring the contexts in which expressing positive emotion has social costs

Research and intuition suggest it is better to express than suppress positive emotion. We explore contexts in which these established findings are flipped, and uncover situations in which expressing emotion can have costs as well as benefits.

Katy H. Greenaway

Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Elise K. Kalokerinos

Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

William Bingley

Student, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

221/13304 Toying with the enemy’s emotions: The social factors that moderate motivated intergroup emotion regulation

We propose that people are motivated to regulate the emotions of outgroup members to attain ingroup goals (Studies 1-3). We demonstrate how social factors influence such motivation (Studies 2-3), and how it ultimately shapes emotions in outgroup members (Study 3).

Liat Netzer

PhD Student, Department of Psychology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

Eran Halperin

Professor, School of Psychology, The Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel

Maya Tamir

Professor, Department of Psychology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

221/13305 Mapping the role of context in emotion regulation in daily life

In two experience sampling studies, we examined how emotion regulation is shaped by context in daily life. We found that strategies varied greatly across events, and that strategy choice and effectiveness was predicted by a range of contextual factors.

Elise K. Kalokerinos

Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Peter Kuppens

Professor, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

221/184 - Past & Prejudice: Representations of the past and their influence in fostering negative intergroup attitudes

Room: Picasso

The present symposium focuses on how historical representations are connected to current intergroup hostility and, more specifically, to majorities’ negative attitudes towards minority groups. All the studies in this symposium examined this link in different national contexts across Europe.

Chair:

Eva Fulop

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Peter Pazmany Catholic University. Budapest. Hungary.

221/18401 Competition over collective victimhood recognition: when lack of recognition for past victimization induces prejudice

Three studies have demonstrated that groups who did not harm each other in the past, but were harmed by a third group, can compete over the recognition of their past sufferings. This competition can then foster negative intergroup attitudes.

Laura De Guissmé

Psychologist, Center for Social and Cultural Psychology, Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

Laurent Licata

Psychologist, Professor, Center for Social and Cultural Psychology, Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

221/18402 Historical victimization and prejudice toward the Roma minority in Hungary

Current study aims to reveal the relationship between the representation of past victimization and current intergroup attitudes in the Hungarian-Roma intergroup context. Exclusive victimhood is presumed to be related to more hostile attitudes while inclusive victimhood to less prejudiced attitudes.

Eva Fulop

Psychologist, Associate Professor, Peter Pazmany Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary

Pal Kovago

Psychologist, Peter Pazmany Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary

Edit Czegledi

Psychologist, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

221/18403 "Historia Magistra Vitae"? The impact of historical victimhood on current conspiracy beliefs and outgroup derogation

In two correlational and one experimental study we demonstrate that collective victimhood facilitated generic and context-related conspiracy thinking whilst outgroup distrust mediated this effect. Exclusive (vs. inclusive) victimhood consciousness accounted for the link between conspiracy thinking and outgroup derogation.

Marta Witkowska

Psychologist, PhD candidate, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

Michal Bilewicz

Psychologist, Professor, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

Myrto Pantazi

Psychologist, PhD candidate, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

Theofilos Gkinopoulos

Political scientist, PhD candidate, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, UK

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

221/18404 The Secondary transfer effects of group-based guilt and shame for in-group atrocities in WWII

Using a between-subjects design, the current research examines whether group-based guilt and shame about in-group mistreatment of Jewish people during WWII affects attitudes towards Muslim minorities in the present, if people perceive a historical analogy between these minority groups.

Anouk Smeekes

Assistant Professor, European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Kaat van Acker

Psychologist, Health Centre De Central, Leuven, Belgium.

221/18405 18405 Which 9-11 Is It? Analogies between current and past attacks are linked to muslim-related attitudes

We conducted two studies following each of the 2015 attacks in France to investigate how different analogies perceived between the current situation and past events (especially, the 9-11 attack) are linked to individuals’ repressive attitudes towards Muslims.

Djouaria Ghilani

Psychologist, Center for Social and Cultural Psychology,Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium

Olivier Luminet

Psychologist, Psychological Sciences Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Andreea Ernst-Vintila

Psychologist, Laboratoire Parisien de Psychologie Sociale, Université Paris-Nanterre, Paris, France

Nicolas Van der Linden

Psychologist, Center for Social and Cultural Psychology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

221/153 - Self-regulation and self-control: Hot topics

Room: Dinner 1

This symposium covers a variety of processes (antecedents of balancing vs. behavioral consistency, improving self-control through practice, the development of limited vs. unlimited willpower theories, future time representation) that underlie (un)successful self-regulation and self-control in personal goal pursuit.

Chair:

Marie Hennecke

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Zurich. Switzerland.

221/15301 Consistency and balancing of everyday health behavior: The role of self-control

A first behavior may lead to a second behavior that either works in the same direction (consistency) or the opposite direction (balancing). This study investigates consistency and balancing of everyday health behavior. Results suggest that trait self-control fosters consistent behavior.

Simone Dohle

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Faculty of Human Sciences. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Wilhelm Hofmann

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Faculty of Human Sciences. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/15302 Does self-control training improve self-control? A meta-analysis

A prominent idea suggests that practicing self-control by repeatedly overriding dominant responses should lead to broad improvements in self-control over time. Here, we provide a meta-analysis of 34 studies testing this idea, report the mean training effectiveness and moderator analyses.

Malte Friese

Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. Saarland University. Saarbruecken. Germany.

Julius Frankenbach

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Saarland University. Saarbruecken. Germany.

David Loschelder

Jun.-Professor. Institute for Strategic Human Resouce Management. Leuphana University. Lueneberg. Germany.

221/15303 Autonomous goal striving promotes a nonlimited belief about willpower

We suggest that autonomous motivation promotes the endorsement of a nonlimited belief about willpower. Four studies provide correlational, longitudinal, and experimental support for this hypothesis showing that measured or experimentally primed autonomous goal-striving predicts a nonlimited willpower belief.

Vanda Sieber

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Zurich. Zurich. Switzerland.

Lavinia Flueckiger

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

Katharina Bernecker

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Zurich. Zurich. Switzerland.

Jutta Mata

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

Veronika Job

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Zurich. Zurich. Switzerland.

221/15304 Next week, next month, next year: How perceived temporal boundaries affect initiation expectations

We demonstrate that planners prefer to initiate goal pursuit on days that immediately follow a temporal boundary. Expectations about goal implementation increase for these days because planners neglect situational constraints when evaluating opportunities after (versus before) temporal boundaries.

Marie Hennecke

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Zurich. Zurich. Switzerland.

Benjamin A. Converse

Professor. Department of Psychology and Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. University of Virginia. Charlottesville, VA. USA.

221/66 - On the Integrated vs. Contested Self-Processes Operating in Intergroup Relations: Bridging Humanistic and Intergroup Approaches

Room: Dinner 2

Humanistic motivational approaches focus on the integrative properties of the self and the different types of motivation. The research here begins to identify how different motivation processes influence intergroup phenomena, and how group processes function to change self-determination and motivation.

Chair:

Catherine Amiot

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Quebec in Montreal. Montreal. Canada.

221/6601 Recognizing ingroup flaws: How a balanced organization of group identity improves ingroup and outgroup attitudes

We examined the mechanisms and consequences of integrating ingroup strengths and shortcomings. Highly autonomous individuals integrated both strengths and shortcomings of their ingroup, whereas less autonomous individuals acknowledged only strengths. This “owning up” to shortcomings also predicted positive intergroup perceptions.

Lisa Legault

Assistant Professor. Clarkson University. Postdam. USA.

Netta Weinstein

Senior Lecturer. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

221/6602 Genocide recovery, poverty reduction, and challenging racism: How self-determined social identification helps change the world

For social movements to succeed the strongest supporters of a cause (high identifiers) should internalize the motivation to take action. In three studies we show that communication-based experimental interventions increase the alignment between social identification and self-determination for collective action.

Craig McGarty

Professor. Western Sydney University. Penrith. Australia.

221/6603 Autonomy Expectations in an Intergroup Context: Implications for Prejudice and Liking

Individuals’ concerns about interacting with outgroup members drive negative attitudes. Here we explored the idea that lower autonomy expectations (expectations for less self-expression) might explain negative outgroup attitudes. Findings from four studies linked autonomy expectations to intergroup emotions and behaviors.

Netta Weinstein

Senior Lecturer. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Lukas Wolf

Postdoctoral Researcher. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Nicole Legate

Assistant Professor. Illinois Institute of Technology. Chicago. Illinois. USA

Lisa Legault

Assistant Professor. Clarkson University. Postdam. USA.

221/6604 All part of a day’s work’: Social identification moderates the relationship between acceptance and well-being

We propose that the acceptance of group-based stressors predicts reductions in psychological distress to the extent that people identify strongly with that group. Two studies demonstrated that only when social identification was high stressor acceptance was effective in promoting well-being.

Monique Crane

Lecturer. Macquarie University. Department of Psychology. North Ryde. Sydney. Australia.

Winnifred Louis

A/Professor. Department of Psychology. The University of Queensland. St Lucia. Brisbane. QLD. Australia.

Jacqueline Phillips

Professor of Neuroscience. Department of Biomedical Science. Macquarie University. North Ryde. Sydney. NSW. Australia.

Catherine Amiot

Professor. University of Québec in Montréal. Department of Psychology. Montréal. Québec. Canada.

Niklas Steffens

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/6605 Can Harmful Normative Behaviors Become Internalized?: Capturing the Identity Factors Promoting the Internalization of Harm

We examine the conditions under which group members can come to internalize intergroup harm. Three experiments revealed greater difficulty in internalizing harm compared to tolerance, even when the harm is normative, but that an exclusive superordinate identity promoted this internalization.

Catherine Amiot

Professor. University of Québec in Montréal. Department of Psychology. Montréal. Québec. Canada.

Winnifred Louis

A/Professor. Department of Psychology. The University of Queensland. St Lucia. Brisbane. QLD. Australia.

Emma Thomas

School of Psychology. Flinders University. Adelaide. Australia.

Marina Doucerain

Postdoctoral Researcher. Université du Québec à Montréal. Department of Psychology. Montréal. Québec. Canada.

221/186 - Social psychological research on information processing and decision making in economical contexts

Room: Andalucía III

Our symposium presents results and implications derived from various studies covering a broad range of decision making issues, including biases in financial decisions, the role of selective attention and information processing in consumer choice, and information checking behavior on websites.

Chair:

Claudia Vogrincic-Haselbacher

Post-doc. Department of Psychology. Social Psychology. University of Graz. Austria.

221/18601 Pitting decision quality against information quantity: A haunting tradeoff

Experiments with psychology and economics students and depressive patients demonstrate conservative biases in a financial investment game: By sampling too much information for individual trading decisions, the number of trading opportunities is too small to optimally exploit the possible payoffs.

Klaus Fiedler

Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

Jürgen Eichberger

Professor. Alfred-Weber-Institute for Economic Sciences. University of Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

Knut Schnell

MD. University Hospital Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

221/18602 Consumer decisions under high information load: Determinants of decision quality

In two experiments we examined individual and contextual determinants of information processing and decision quality in an applied economical context. Successful outcomes involved focused processing of a medium amount of information and were related to diverse individual and contextual variables.

Ursula Athenstaedt

Professor. Department of Psychology. Social Psychology. University of Graz. Graz. Austria.

Claudia Vogrincic-Haselbacher

Post-doc.Department of Psychology. Social Psychology. University of Graz. Graz. Austria.

Isabelle Dinslaken

PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. Social Psychology. University of Graz. Graz. Austria.

Brigitta Lurger

Professor. Institute of Civil Law, Foreign and Private International Law. University of Graz. Graz. Austria.

Florian Caks

PhD candidate. Institute of Civil Law, Foreign and Private International Law. University of Graz. Graz. Austria.

221/18603 How selective attention shapes consumers’ preferences

In two experiments, we examined whether selective attention during a first exposure phase influences choice in a subsequent task through earlier and longer fixations, activation of learned selection responses, and perceived fluency. The results show the importance of perceived fluency.

Arnd Florack

Professor. Department of Applied Psychology. Applied Social Psychology and Consumer Research. University of Vienna. Vienna. Austria

Martin Egger

PhD candidate. Department of Applied Psychology. Applied Social Psychology and Consumer Research. University of Vienna. Vienna. Austria

221/18604 Click Or Skip: The Role Of Experience In Easy-Click Checking Decisions

Based on the decisions from experience framework we explain that both under- as well as overchecking may result from the underweighting of rare events due to reliance on small samples of past checking experiences. Accordingly we suggest intervention strategies.

Yefim Roth

PhD candidate. Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management at the Technion, Haifa. Haifa.Israel.

Michaela Wänke

Professor. Department of Consumer Psychology. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany

Ido Erev

Professor. Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management at the Technion, Haifa. Haifa.Israel.

221/102 - New perspectives on prosocial behaviour

Room: Andalucía II

This symposium brings together recent contributions to the field of prosocial behaviour. The first two presentations highlight the impact of group membership on prosocial behaviour. The last two presentations test the effectiveness of strategies for promoting intergroup and/or society-wide prosociality.

Chairs:

Ana Leite

Social Psychologist. Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Roehampton. London. United Kingdom.

Julie Van De Vyver

School of Psychology, University of Lincoln. UK

221/10201 Intergroup name-calling: Comparing helpful bystander intentions to victim-perpetrator-bystander triads

This study examines bystander responses to name-calling from an intergroup perspective (British membership vs. Eastern European). When an outgroup bystander was presented, participants were more likely to report ‘telling a teacher’ for an outgroup victim, compared to an ingroup victim.

Nicola Abbott

Developmental Social Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology. Canterbury Christ Church University. Canterbury. UK.

Sally Palmer

Developmental Social Psychologist. Lecturer. Department of Psychology and Human Development. UCL Institute of Education. London. UK

Julie Van De Vyver

School of Psychology, University of Lincoln. UK

221/10202 Challenging intergroup social exclusion: Differences between majority and minority-status members

The current study examines children's (N=367) responses to intergroup social exclusion. Majority (Cypriot) and minority (non-Cypriot) participant evaluations and helping intentions differ: non-Cypriot's evaluate intergroup exclusion more negatively and report higher helping intentions. However, intergroup contact predicts helping among Cypriots.

Sally Palmer

Developmental Social Psychologist. Lecturer. Department of Psychology and Human Development. UCL Institute of Education. London. UK

Andrea Filippou

Department of Psychology and Human Development. UCL Institute of Education. London. UK

221/10203 Indirect contact as a strategy to promote outgroup prosociality

Two studies (one experiment and one correlational) examine the effectiveness of indirect intergroup contact in promoting outgroup prosociality. Results offer support to the idea that indirect contact can effectively promote outgroup prosociality, through similar mechanisms through which it reduces prejudice.

Ana Leite

Social Psychologist. Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Roehampton. London. UK.

Julie Van De Vyver

School of Psychology, University of Lincoln. UK

Dominic Abrams

Social Psychologist. Professor. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

Georgina Randsley de Moura

Social Psychologist. Senior Lecturer and Head of School. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

Lynsey Mahmood

Social Psychologist. Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

221/10204 The arts as a social psychological catalyst for human prosociality and cooperation

Testing a psychological model of arts and kindness we analyse data from a nationally representative UK sample (N = 30,476). Results show that, over and above personality and demographic variables, individuals’ arts engagement predicts their prosociality over time.

Julie Van De Vyver

School of Psychology, University of Lincoln. UK

Dominic Abrams

Social Psychologist. Professor. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

221/10205 Discussion

Mark Levine

Professor of Social Psychology, University of Exeter. UK

221/59 - How men and women regulate work and family roles in face of different social norms

Room: Seminar

This symposium outlines the gendered social norms men and women face in combining work and family roles. We show how adhering to or deviating from such norms evokes different self-regulatory processes and examine possibilities for change towards gender equality.

Chair:

Loes Meeussen

Postdoctoral researcher. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/5901 Sticky and Slippery Gender Stereotypes: The Gender Prioritization Model

In this theoretical and empirical talk, I will present a new model building on previous theory to explain why penalty and praise of people who act in gender incongruent ways may perpetuate gender stereotypes

Elizabeth Haines

Professor. Department of Psychology. William Paterson University. Wayne, New Jersey. United States of America.

Steve Stroessner

Professor. Department of Psychology. Barnard College. New York. United States of America.

Kay Deaux

Professor. Department of Psychology. City University of New York. New York. United States of America.

Ashley Lemoncelli

Researcher. Department of Psychology. William Paterson University. Wayne, New Jersey. United States of America.

Nicole Lofaro

Researcher. Department of Psychology. William Paterson University. Wayne, New Jersey. United States of America.

221/5902 The fairy tale of the Queen Bee: How organizations contribute to the lack of support

We showed that Queen Bee-responses are not an inherent characteristics of women leaders, but a consequence of career difficulties they experienced due to the lack of organizational support and the personal sacrifices they have had to make for career success.

Klea Faniko

Postdoctoral researcher. Social Psychology. University of Utrecht. Utrecht. The Netherlands

Naomi Ellemers

Professor. Social Psychology. University of Utrecht. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Belle Derks

Professor. Social Psychology. University of Utrecht. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/5903 Regulating work and family roles: The role of regulatory focus and minimal vs. maximal goals

Regulation orientations in work and family identities affect outcomes within that identity (positive effects of promotion focus), and also spill-over from the parent to work identity: Parents’ prevention focus and minimal goals relate to lower work outcomes through family-to-work conflict.

Loes Meeussen

Postdoctoral researcher. Center for Social and Cultural psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

Colette van Laar

Professor. Center for Social and Cultural psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/5904 Emphasizing the benefits of combining work and family reduces guilt among working parents

Results of two studies suggest that parents perceive work-family conflict to negatively impact their family. Especially mothers feel guilty about this. Interestingly, guilt can be reduced in parents (especially in mothers) when they are made aware of work-related benefits.

Elisabeth Aarntzen

PhD student. Social Psychology. University of Utrecht. Utrecht. The Netherlands

Elianne Van Steenbergen

Professor. Social Psychology. University of Utrecht. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Belle Derks

Professor. Social Psychology. University of Utrecht. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Tanja van der Lippe

Professor. Social Sciences. University of Utrecht. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/5905 Are women’s possible selves constrained by men’s (relative lack of) domestic involvement?

Four experiments showed that women primed with information about men’s growing interest in caregiving roles were more likely to envision themselves as primary breadwinners of their future families. This gender role complementarity was strongest among women with ambitious career goals.

Alyssa Croft

Professor. Psychology Department. University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. United States of America.

Toni Schmader

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada.

Katharina Block

PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada.

221/131 - Sex, drugs, and modern dance: Understanding the dynamics of interpersonal status through social network analysis

Room: Andalucía I

Can dancing, drinking, and sexual promiscuity foster social ties and interpersonal status? This symposium presents social network analysis as a state-of-the-art method for complementing traditional self-report measures, which can expand our knowledge of young adolescents’ and adults’ social psychological worlds.

Chair:

Lysann Zander

Education and Psychology. Freie Universität and Social Psychology. New York University. Berlin. Germany.

221/13101 Friendships, Personality, Sexual Behavior, and Group Identity in Fraternities and Sororities: Longitudinal Social Network Analyses

232 fraternity and sorority members provided information about friendships across 3 time points. Longitudinal analyses revealed that increases in sociosexual behavior (having more sex partners) related positively to increases in popularity for men in fraternities but not women in sororities.

Gregory Webster

Social Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, United States

Patrick Ewell

Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, United States

Rosanna E. Rosanna E.

Psychology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, United States

C. Veronica Smith

Psychology, University of Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi, United States

Corinne A. Novell

Psychology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

221/13102 Popular Till You Puke: Alcohol Misuse and Personality Traits Facilitate College Social Network Structure

We conducted two studies of college social networks. Personality and alcohol misuse were predictors of network connectedness and increased connections between similar alcohol users. Longitudinal analyses supported a model of preferential acquaintance, rather than peer influence on drinking behaviors.

Allan Clifton

Department of Psychological Science, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, United States

Laura Townsend

Department of Psychological Science, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, United States

221/13103 Me, Us, and Them: Testing Sociometer Theory in a Socially Diverse Real-Life Context

We examined 1,057 13-year-old students in 3 annual waves. Cross-lagged analyses revealed that popularity among in-group but not out-group peers prospectively predicted self-esteem, which was mediated by self-perceived popularity. Self-esteem in turn prospectively predicted self- but not peer-perceived popularity.

Anne K. Reitz

Columbia Aging Center, Columbia University, New York City, United States

Frosso Motti-Stefanidi

Faculty of Psychology, School of Philosophy, University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Jens B. Asendorpf

Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Berlin, Germany

221/13104 How social networks mediate the effect of a dance intervention on students’ sense of belonging

Information about social networks and sense of belonging were collected in 30 classrooms—15 partaking in a project involving weekly collective dancing sessions. Longitudinal mediation analyses showed that dancing facilitated experienced belonging via increasing actual acceptance by and of co-dancers.

Lysann Zander

Education & Psychology, Freie Universität Berlin; Social Psychology, New York University Berlin, Germany

Madeleine Kreutzmann

Education & Psychology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Gregory D. Webster

Professor, Social Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, United States

Bettina Hannover

Education & Psychology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany

221/13105 Discussion of Contributions

Vera Hoorens

Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Leuven, Netherlands

16.40 - 18.20 h. Blitz: Presentations IV

Session 7: Moral judgments

Room: Albéniz

221/1070 The role of perceived complexity in moral judgement

Three studies use a novel method of manipulating perceptions of complexity of a cause-effect chain; showing that a person involved in a process perceived as complex received more lenient moral judgements than one involved in a process perceived as simple.

Colin Foad

Research Associate. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. United Kingdom.

Greg Maio

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Bath. Bath. United Kingdom.

221/1134 Moral Roles - How role-taking shapes third-party behavior in norm conflicts.

All norm conflicts share the same expectation-based social structure, consisting of a finite set of roles. Third-party behavior in norm conflicts can be explained by the interplay of role-taking and identity-related processes.

Johannes Schwabe

Research Associate (PhD Cand.). Psychological Methods. Department of Psychology. Philipp-University Marburg. Marburg. Germany

Mario Gollwitzer

Psychologist. Professor. Psychological Methods. Department of Psychology. Philipp-University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

221/1539 Power and Moral Reasoning

Four studies tested the generalizability and underlying mechanism of the notion that possession or lack of power affects moral reasoning. Power only affects moral reasoning under low conflict dilemmas rather than high conflict ones. Goal-orientation and cognitive processing style are possible mechanisms.

Mufan Zheng

PhD Candidate. Department of Experimental Psychology. Division of Psychology and Language Sciences. University College London. London

Ana Guinote

Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. Division of Psychology and Language Sciences. University College London. London

221/7401 A closer look at the moral high ground: Deontological judges are perceived as more moral

Targets who reject (vs. accept) outcome-maximizing harm in moral dilemmas are perceived as more moral. Morality perceptions can be differentiated from warmth, and are driven by perceived moral rule adherence. However, expressing deontological judgments also has negative consequences for judges.

Alexa Weiss

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Sarah C. Rom

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Paul Conway

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Florida State University. Tallahassee. USA.

221/7402 Reactions to the moral behavior of others

We investigate how people react to the moral behavior of others. We will demonstrate positive, as well as negative reactions to the moral behavior of others, in a range of studies in different content domains.

Florien Cramwinckel

Psychologist. Social and Organizational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands.

Kees van den Bos

Psychologist. Social, Health & Organizational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Eric Van Dijk

Psychologist. Psychology and Social Decision Making. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands.

221/7403 Satanists and scientists: Justice sensitivity moderates memory and perception for targets who violate social expectations

Two studies investigated justice sensitivity in relation to how targets with negative vs positive social labels who act morally vs unmorally are remembered and perceived. Counterintuitively, people who fear exploitation are likely to remember trustworthy Satanists better than untrustworthy scientists.

Philipp Süssenbach

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Philipps-University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

Mario Gollwitzer

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Philipps-University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

221/7404 Feelings of immorality influence the selection of moral comparison targets

Seven studies show that people with a threatened sense of morality avoid upward moral comparisons. This effect extends to everyday choices and even occurs when downward comparisons are costly. The effect also extends to extreme comparisons, but not to nonhumans.

Alexandra Fleischmann

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Joris Lammers

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Adam D. Galinsky

Psychologist. Columbia Business School. Columbia University. New York. USA.

221/1730 Thermography, empathy and moral dilemmas

We researched the relationship between body temperature, moral judgment, empathy and cognitive style (deliberative or intuitive), finding that high and low empathy participants have different thermal changes, different cognitive styles and tended to make opposite decisions resolving moral dilemmas.

Alejandro Moliné Segovia

Pre-doctoral psychologist student. University of Granada.

Óscar Iborra

Postdoctoral psychology researcher. University of Granada

Francisco Tornay

Psychologist. Professor. University of Granada

Juan Manuel De la Fuente

Postdoctoral psychology researcher. University of Granada

Emilio Gómez Milán

Psychologist. Professor. University of Granada.

221/1792 The Denial of Morality, Competence, and Sociability through Verbal Insults

Five empirical studies examined whether the fundamental dimensions of social judgement drive devaluation of others through verbal insults and whether denying morality leads to stronger social-cognitive, emotional and behavioural reactions than competence and sociability. Findings confirmed the primacy of morality.

Flavia Albarello

Psychologist. Research fellow. Universy of Bologna

221/1497 Beyond Outcomes: The Influence of Intentions and Deception

Using a dyadic Sender-Responder Game we investigate the influence of intention, outcome and deception on reward and punishment. Responses to behavior of others depend more strongly on intentions than outcomes, especially when verification of the real intentions is possible.

Nils Köbis

Post-Doctoral Researcher, CREED, Department of Economics, Univeristy of Amsterdam

Schächtele Simeon

PhD, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual, and Brain Sciences University College London

Tobias Gerstenberg

PhD student, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual, and Brain Sciences University College London

Ro'i Zultan

Senior Lecturer, Department of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Shaul Shalvi

Associate Professor, Center for Research in Experimental Economics and political Decision making and at the Psychology Department at the University of Amsterdam

Yaakov Kaarev

Professor (emeritus) of Education; Department of Education, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

221/1416 The effect of moral blame on attitudinal and behavioral change

Moral pressure groups often use blame to encourage attitudinal and behavioral change. We, however, hypothesized that blame is counterproductive. Testing this hypothesis regarding promotion of veganism, we found blame-framing increased justification of current behavior, and correspondingly, attitudinal and behavioral entrenchment.

Deborah Shulman

PhD student. Baruch Ivcher School of Pyschology. The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. Herzliya. Israel

Mor Shnitzer

MA student. Baruch Ivcher School of Pyschology. The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. Herzliya. Israel

Michal Reifen Tagar

Psychologist. Baruch Ivcher School of Pyschology. The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. Herzliya. Israel

221/1837 Brief exposure to Pope Francis heightens moral beliefs about climate change

Has Pope Francis's call for climate change action influenced moral beliefs about the issue? In a representative survey experiment, priming the pope heightened Americans' moral beliefs about climate change and attributions of personal responsibility. Key moderators (issue awareness) are discussed.

Jonathon Schuldt

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Communication. Cornell University. USA.

Adam Pearson

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Pomona College. Claremont, California. USA.

Rainer Romero-Canyas

Psychologist. Environmental Defense Fund. New York, NY. USA.

Dylan Larson-Konar

Environmental Defense Fund. New York, NY. USA.

221/1436 A test of the moral value of food consumption using the moral balancing paradigm.

Participants randomly assigned to consume a healthy or unhealthy food were found to be equally likely to cheat after food consumption. However, participants who ate the unhealthy food were more likely to volunteer than those who ate the healthy food.

Xochitl De la Piedad García

Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology. Australian Catholic University. Melbourne. Australia

Aimee Brown

Honours Student. School of Psychology. Australian Catholic University. Melbourne. Australia

Jake Linardon

PhD Candidate. School of Psychology. Australian Catholic University. Melbourne. Australia

Leah Kaufmann

Lecturer. School of Psychology. Australian Catholic University. Melbourne. Australia

221/1815 Saving Mr. Robot: Anthropomorphism affects utilitarian decision-making about non-human agents in moral dilemmas

When facing a moral dilemma, the perceived humanness of a victim affects our moral decision-making. This study demonstrates that this extends to robots: when presented in an anthropomorphic manner, robots are sacrificed less often than when presented in neutral terms.

Sari Nijssen

PhD Candidate. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

Barbara C.N. Müller

Assistant Professor. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands

Markus Paulus

Professor. Department of Psychology. Ludwig Maximilan University. Munich. Germany

Session 8: Close relationships

Room: Machado

221/1396 Situational triggers of attachment insecurity

A relationship study (80 couples) isolated key situations in which it may be most important for coupe members to buffer their partner’s attachment anxiety. The study suggests broader relationship processes that may redirect insecurity.

Ximena Arriaga

Professor. Department of Psychological Sciences. Purdue University. West Lafayete, IN. USA.

Madoka Kumashiro

Senior Lecturer. Psychology Department. Goldsmiths, University of London. New Cross, London. United Kingdom.

221/1505 Power and anger as risk factors in high impact conflicts within intimate relationships

Conflicts can lead the deterioration of couple relationships. Two studies have shown the negative impact of the seriousness of the conflict and relational power through anger on increasing destructive strategies used to deal with conflicts that can damage affective relationships.

María Alonso Ferres

Psychologist. Department of social Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

Inmaculada Valor Segura

Psychologist. Professor. Department of social Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

221/1184 Justification of sexual coercion tactics as a condition of leaving the intimate relationship

This research analyzes the influence of sexual coaxing, sexual coercion and sexual aggression on the justification of the aggression and on the probability of leaving the relationship, as well as how dependency and sexual assertiveness moderated this relation.

Marta Garrido Macías

Psychologist. PhD Student. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

Inmaculada Valor Segura

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

Francisca Expósito Jiménez

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Social Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

221/1572 Being ready for a committed relationship: Testing hypothesized antecedents

We examined hypothesized antecedents of commitment readiness, the subjective sense of feeling ready for a committed relationship at a given time. In two cross-sectional studies, involving college students and MTurk participants, significant associations in hypothesized directions were found.

Christopher Agnew

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychological Sciences. Purdue University. West Lafayette, Indiana. USA

Benjamin Hadden

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychological Sciences. Purdue University. West Lafayette, Indiana. USA

Kenneth Tan

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychological Sciences. Purdue University. West Lafayette, Indiana. USA

221/1309 It Doesn't Hurt to Ask: Question-Asking Increases Liking

Across three studies of live conversations, we identity a robust relationship between question-asking and liking. Using machine learning algorithms to detect follow-up questions in speed-dating data, we find that people who ask more follow-up questions get second dates more often.

Karen Huang

PhD Candidate. Harvard University. Cambridge. USA.

Mike Yeomans

Postdoctoral Fellow. Harvard University. Cambridge. USA.

Alison Brooks

Assistant Professor. Harvard University. Cambridge. USA.

Julia Minson

Assistant Professor. Harvard University. Cambridge. USA.

Francesca Gino

Professor. Harvard University. Cambridge. USA.

221/1242 Romantic relationships increase self-other integration in Joint Simon Task

The present study tested the influence of romantic relationship vs. friendship on the Joint Simon Effect (JSE) – indexing the inclusion of the other in the self. Romantic relationship facilitated the JSE, providing empirical evidence for the self-expansion model of love.

Virginie Quintard

PhD Student. University of Poitiers. CNRS. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage. France

Stéphane Jouffre

Associate Professor. University of Poitiers. CNRS. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage. France

Jean-Claude Croizet

Professor. University of Poitiers. CNRS. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage. France

Cedric Bouquet

Professor. University of Poitiers. CNRS. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage. France

221/1627 Facebook or Face-to-Face: What’s the Difference? An investigation of offline theories of relationship formation in a social media context

Viewing a person’s social media self-disclosures without engaging in any direct interaction with that person - known as passive consumption - has become common. In the light of this development, our study aimed to re-examine traditional theories of face-to-face interaction.

Amy Christiane Orben

Doctoral Candidate. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. United Kingdom.

Robin Dunbar

Professor of Evolutionary Psychology. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. United Kingdom.

221/1525 From relational to interstitial communication: the influence of intimacy, frequency and positivity on relationship satisfaction

Mobile phones have changed relationship maintenance to interstitial communication. We examined how emotional closeness and geographical distance affect communication patterns (used channels; frequency and content (intimacy, positivity, entertainment value)) and how frequency and content of messages predict relationship satisfaction.

Sonja Utz

Psychologist. Professor. Social Media Lab. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Tübingen, Germany

Rebecca Cobban

Psychology student. University of Glasgow. Glasgow. UK

221/1824 Implicit partner evaluations and close relationships satisfaction: The mediating role of positive non-verbal behaviors

Integrating research on interpersonal processes and implicit social cognition, we investigated spontaneous mechanisms that could explain the effects of implicit partner evaluations on romantic relationship. We showed that positive non-verbal behaviors mediated these effects on subsequent relationship satisfaction.

Ruddy Faure

PhD Student. Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology. Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Francesca Righetti

Assistant Professor. Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology. Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Magdalena Seibel

PhD Student. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Faculty of Human Sciences. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Wilhelm Hofmann

Professor. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Faculty of Human Sciences. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/1797 Individual and Dyadic Gain Spirals of Resources

Two–wave, dyadic study (N = 130 working couples) found support for individual and dyadic resource accumulation: contextual resources (social support) improved work engagement through an increase in personal resources (self–efficacy) although results differed across gender.

Ewelina Smoktunowicz

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities. Warsaw. Poland

Roman Cieslak

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities. Warsaw. Poland/Psychologist. Trauma, Health, and Hazards Center, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, US

Evangelia Demerouti

Psychologist. Department of Industrial Engineering & Innovation Sciences, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands

221/1667 Does Michelangelo Care About Age? Age-related Differences in the Michelangelo Phenomenon

The Michelangelo phenomenon describes how people move closer to their ideal self based on their close partners’ perceptual and behavioral affirmation. Examining age-related differences, our study revealed the framework as both age-generalizable and age-dependent with respect to particular aspects.

Janina Larissa Bühler

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Basel. Basel. Switzerland.

Rebekka Weidmann

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Basel. Switzerland.

Madoka Kumashiro

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Goldsmiths, University of London. London. United Kingdom.

Alexander Grob

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Basel. Basel. Switzerland.

221/1709 Mindfulness benefits Relationships by promoting Acceptance

Results of two studies suggested that mindfulness benefited romantic relationship satisfaction by promoting acceptance of partner imperfections. Mindfulness was either measured as a trait or manipulated over 12 days. Results further suggested that benefits extended to the dyadic level.

Gesa Kappen

Social and Cultural Psychology, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Johan Karremans

Associate Professor, Social and Cultural Psychology, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

William Burk

Professor, Developmental Psychology, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

221/1791 The role of close friendships in individual empathic abilities

How are individual mentalizing abilities related to intimacy in peer groups and the formation of close friendships? Using peer nominations in school classes, this study examined the link between social ties and individual empathy and perspective taking skills.

Miriam Hollarek

PhD. Educational Neuroscience. Free University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Lydia Krabbendam

Psychologist. Professor. Educational Neuroscience. Free University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Nikki Lee

Psychologist. PostDoc. Educational Neuroscience. Free University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

18.20 - 19.30 h. Round Table Discussion: The EASP Diversity Report

Room: Manuel Falla

18.20 - 19.30 h. Poster: Session 1

Room: Hall

Social Cognition

221/1015 Self-affirmation improves music performance among performers high in sensation seeking.

We tested whether a self-affirmation manipulation could improve undergraduate students’ achievement in a formal musical performance examination. Self-affirmation augmented the performance of musicians who would otherwise perform worse than their counterparts under formal evaluative circumstances; those high in sensation seeking.

Susan Churchill

Senior Lecturer, University of Chichester, Chichester, West Sussex, UK

Donna Jessop

Senior Lecturer, University of Sussex, Falmer, East Sussex, UK

Peter Harris

Professor, University of Sussex, Falmer, East Sussex, UK

221/1027 Conflict and embodiment in decision making

One experiment presents how dominant/non-dominant hand use impacts information processing in base rate fallacy (BRF) problems. Using non-dominant hand, to solve neutral problems (vs congruent / non-congruent problems-the conflict variable), increases the number of correct answers in BRF problems.

Mihaela Boza

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi. Iasi. Romania

221/1050 The mediating role of emotion regulation between subjective well-being and brainstorming in university students

In this study, we examined relations among of emotion regulation, subjective well-being and brainstorming, and mediator role of emotion regulation between subjective well-being and brainstorming.

Bilgesu Hascuhadar

Psychologist. Research Asssistant. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

Hamit COSKUN

Psychologist. Professor. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

221/1053 Beast in the Crowd and the Ugliness Avoidance Bias

Introducing the face-in-the-crowd paradigm to physical attractiveness research, we found in two studies (total n = 230), that low physically attractive targets were processed more efficiently compared to average and high attractive targets, supporting the Ugliness Avoidance Bias.

Sascha Schwarz

Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. University of Wuppertal. Wuppertal. Germany

Manfred Hassebrauck

Psychologist. Professor. University of Wuppertal. Wuppertal. Germany

221/1056 Victim Sensitivity Predicts Aggression Above and Beyond the Hostile Attribution Bias

Victim sensitivity predicted higher aggression in N=349 adults and N=279 adolescents when controlling for the hostile attribution bias. It was the more consistent and stronger predictor—particularly in children and reactive aggression. Victim sensitivity requires stronger attention by aggression research.

Rebecca Bondü

Psychologist. Professor for Developmental Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Konstanz. Konstanz. Germany.

221/1077 Fear, helplessness and injustice: social representations of repressions and rehabilitation in three generations of descendants of repressed people

The study revealed how the distance towards the repressions influenced on the SRs of repressions, repressed people and rehabilitation, as well as on the work over the traumatic experience.

Inna Bovina

Social psychologist. Professor. Moscow State University of Psychology and Education. Moscow.Russia

Tatiana Ryabova

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Russian State University for the Humanities. Moscow. Russia.

Vladislav Konkin

Psychologist. PhD Student. Moscow State University of Psychology & Education. Moscow.Russia

221/1089 stereotyping, decision-making, mathematical modelling

Notwithstanding years of research — and countless demonstrations of the undesirable consequences of stereotyping — the precise mechanisms through which stereotypes influence person construal remain unknown. Here, using mathematical modelling, it was shown that stereotyping is underpinned by a decisional bias.

Johanna Falben

School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

Marius Golubickis

School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

Neil Macrae

School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

221/1093 The other side of the bookshelf on the paradoxical concequences of spatial perspective rotation for infrahumanization

The present research examined spatial perspective taking and how it affects the perception of other people’s emotionality The results showed- rotation conditions amplified the effect of infra-humanization, the partner was seen as less capable of experiencing uniquely human emotions.

Anna Szuster

Psychologist. Professor. Faculty of Psychology University of Warsaw

Agnieszka Wojnarowska

Psychologist. Dr. Faculty of Psychology. University of Warsaw

221/1094 EEG components of Social Simon Effect

The aim of this study was to investigate how performing a task with another person affects action planning and control. We used simple cognitive task (Simon task) and we measured (ERPs) while subjects performed this task individually and in pairs.

Dorota Karwowska

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Faculty of Psychology. University of Warsaw

Magdalena Zieleniewska

Physicist. Faculty of Physics. University of Warsaw

Anna Chabuda

Physicist. Faculty of Physics. University of Warsaw

221/1106 Contextualized attribution:how do young unemployed people blame themselves and the system?

This mixed methods study investigates how young unemployed people attribute in times of neoliberalism emphasising the role of the self. We find that investigating attributions as self-blame and system-blame sheds new light on the complex relationship between attributions and subjective well-being.

Sabina Pultz

Ph.D, Department of Psychology, Centre for Applied and Theoretical Social Psychology, University of Copenhagen

221/1112 Are We Mere Numbers? Magnitude Processing in Social Comparisons

Magnitudes and space are interlocked through a mental line. So far it is unclear if this mental line also influences social comparisons. In a behavioral experiment, we found evidence that social attributes are indeed processed as magnitudes.

Lisa V. Eckerstorfer

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Graz. Graz. Austria

Gayannee Kedia

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Graz. Graz. Austria

Katja Corcoran

Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology. University of Graz. Graz. Austria

221/1121 Exploring Religiosity and Sacrificial Harm Rejection: Separate and Shared Pathways to Deontological and Utilitarian Inclinations

We used process dissociation to explore mediators between religiosity and moral dilemma judgments. Empathic concern mediated religiosity on deontological inclinations, whereas belief in divine commands mediated reduced utilitarian inclinations. Fatalism and moral absolutism positively mediated religiosity on both parameters simultaneously.

Caleb Reynolds

Graduate Student. Department of Psychology. Florida State University. Tallahassee, FL. United States.

Paul Conway

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Florida State University. Tallahassee, FL. United States.

221/1140 Studying deception in social context: do more intelligent people lie more often?

Although all people are known to lie on occasion, some do so decidedly more often than others. Our study used a non-instructed lying Speed Dating Task paradigm to prove that intelligent people lie more often than people with lower intellectual abilities.

Justyna Sarzynska

Psychologist. Doctor. Institut of Psychology. Polish Academy of Sciences. Warsaw. Poland

Marcel Falkiewicz

Psychologist, Doctor, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany

Justyna Babula

University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland

Monika Riegel

Psychologist, Institut of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland

Anna Grabowska

Professor, Institut of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland

Iwona Szatkowska

Professor, Institut of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland

221/1156 Social representations of Russian students about status

The goal of research is to study the structure and content of student’s representations about high and low status. It was found that the cores of representations of leaders and outsiders have differences in number of elements and content orientation.

Marianna Sachkova

Psychologist. Professor. Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration. Moscow. Russia.

Irina Timoshina

Psychologist. Moscow State University of Psychology and Education. Moscow. Russia.

221/1166 Study of the Factor modulating commitment for children

This study tried to identify factors involved in the modulation of commitment for children. Children were submitted to a foot in the door situation and social development was measured for each child. No social development effect on commitment was found.

Clément POIRIER

Phd student, University of Bordeaux, France

Alexandre Pascual

Phd, University of Bordeaux, France

221/1167 The Impact of Effort Expenditure on Stereotyping in Older Age

Drawing on Hess' Selective Engagement Theory, we examined whether greater stereotyping among older vs. young adults, can be decreased through higher effort. Despite older adults' higher effort expenditure in the task, they were more prone to stereotyping than younger counterparts.

Gabriela Czarnek

Psychologist. Phd student. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Krakow, Poland

Małgorzata Kossowska

Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Krakow, Poland

Michael Richter

Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. Natural Sciences and Psychology. Faculty of Science. Liverpool John Moores University. Liverpool. UK

221/1170 Moral development in juvenile offenders: A meta-analytic review

From the perspective of social competence model, moral development is presented as an interesting factor to reduce delinquency. This meta-analytical review aims to prove whether the development of moral reasoning is located in lower stages in juvenile offenders.

María Patricia Navas Sánchez

Psychologist. University of Santiago de Compostela. Santiago de Compostela. Spain

Jorge Sobral Fernández

Psychologist. Professor of Social Psychology. Department of Legal and Organizational Psychology and Methodology of Behavioural Science. University of Santiago de Compostela. Santiago de Compostela. Spain

221/1189 The Role of Temporal Distance in Prospective Attributions to Will

Beliefs about the impact of will imply making choices based on inner goals. We demonstrated in three studies that construal of events in terms of goals (manipulated via temporal distance or measured as an individual tendency) enhances attributions to will.

Elena Stephan

Department of Psychology. Bar-Ilan University. Israel

Daniella Shidlovski

Department of Psychology. Bar-Ilan University. Israel

Daniel Heller

The Faculty of Management. Tel Aviv University. Israel

221/1216 Males are on top and females on bottom in cognition

Our studies suggest that stereotypical thinking involves spatial simulation. We found that when participants thought about gender in stereotypic ways (males-powerful; females-powerless), they tended to mentally simulate males at the top and females at the bottom of the vertical dimension.

Natalia Zarzeczna

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Ulrich von Hecker

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Geoffrey Haddock

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

221/1218 Misery Loves Company: Moral Judgments of Harm to Single versus Multiple Victims

We report what seems to be a bias in moral judgment, showing that an immoral act is judged as less immoral when it affects several victims - compared to a single individual.

Daffie Konis

PhD Candidate. School of Psychological Sciences. Tel-Aviv University. Israel.

Uriel Haran

Social Psychologist. Department of Management. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Beer-Sheva. Israel

Kelly Saporta

Cognitive Psychologist. Department of Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

Shahar Ayal

Social Psychologist. Baruch Ivcher School of psychology. Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Israel

221/1238 Being in a high-power role leads to over-dehumanize objectified targets

Dehumanization occurs when targets are objectified or when high-power perceivers describe low-power targets. We observed here that high-power perceivers over-dehumanized objectified targets by attributing them much less intelligence, competence and by considering them as less worthy of moral consideration.

Stéphane Jouffre

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, CeRCA (UMR CNRS 7295), University of Poitiers, France

221/1240 Stereotype-consistent recall: From subtle gender cues to autobiographical memory biases

Integrating research on stereotype priming and reconstructive memory, we hypothesized that the exposure to gender-related cues influences autobiographical recall. We showed that the more participants had stereotyped associations the more they reported stereotype-consistent memories following the exposition to gender-related cues.

Tina Chevallereau

PhD Student. Catholic University of Louvain. Louvain-La-Neuve. Belgium.

Leila Selimbegovic

Assistant Professor. University of Poitiers. Poitiers. France.

Yvana Bocage-Barthelemy

PhD Student. University of Poitiers. Poitiers. France.

Ruddy Faure

PhD Student. VU University Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Serge Guimond

Professor. Blaise Pascal University. Clermont-Ferrand. France.

Armand Chatard

Professor. University of Poitiers. Poitiers. France.

221/1246 Deliberation decreases the likelihood of expressing dominant responses: But is this merely an effect of time passing?

We highlight the possibility that time is a confounding factor when comparing spontaneous and deliberative responses. We support this claim with evidence that deliberation reduces the likelihood of expressing dominant response; an effect that may be solely attributed to time.

Torsten Martiny-Huenger

Tromsø

Peter M. Gollwitzer

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. New York University, USA/ University of Konstanz, Germany

221/1263 Would you cuddle a square? Learning to associate stereotypes with curvilinear and rectilinear stimuli

We investigated stereotype learning with minimal stereotypes and artificial curvi- vs. rectilinear face-like stimuli. Learning occurred in both conditions based on the degree of covariation of features, but we noted differences in baseline perception of the two groups of stimuli

Julia Charlotte Eberlen

Psychologist. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. Faculty for Psychology and Educational Sciences. Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium

Matteo Gagliolo

Computer Scientist. Group for Ethnic Relations, Migration and Equality. Institut for Sociology. Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

221/1269 Change in Live Events and Identity during people’s life: the CEVI international research project

As part of the CEVI international research program, life turning points (during last year and life) and socio-historical events were asked to 267 participants (Basque Country, Spain), paying attention to the impact on wellbeing and to different age cohorts.

José Pizarro

Psychologist. PhD Student. Social Psychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. Psychology School. University of The Basque Country. Donostia. Spain

Lander Méndez

Psychologist. Master Student. Social Psychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. Psychology School. University of The Basque Country. Donostia. Spain

Saioa Telletxea

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Social Psychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. Pharmacy School. University of The Basque Country. Vitoria-Gasteiz. Spain

Dario Páez

Psychologist. Professor. Social Psychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. Psychology School. University of The Basque Country. Donostia. Spain

221/1270 Nudging healthy choices at the checkout counter - an investigation of effectiveness and acceptability

In this field study, the effectiveness and acceptability of placing healthy foods at the checkout counter display was investigated. Results showed that this nudge was well-accepted by customers and that it increased healthy food sales and individual purchases.

Laurentius van Gestel

PhD Candidate. Utrecht University. Social, Health and Organisational Psychology. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Floor Kroese

Assistant Professor. Utrecht University. Social, Health and Organisational Psychology. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Denise de Ridder

Professor. Utrecht University. Social, Health and Organisational Psychology. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/1278 Vigilance for norms in reaction to psychological threat

Psychological threats related to perceptions of uncontrollability may induce a state of attentional vigilance for information about social norms. This could enable social reactions serving to restore perceptions of control. Preliminary evidence and plans for future research will be discussed.

Felix Dominik Czepluch

Doctoral Student. Department of Social Psychology. University of Leipzig. Leipzig. Germany.

Philipp Jugert

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology. University of Leipzig. Leipzig. Germany.

Immo Fritsche

Professor. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology. University of Leipzig. Leipzig. Germany.

221/1304 Need for Cognitive Closure decreases risk taking and motivates discounting of delayed rewards

Results of 3 studies show that Need for cognitive closure is negatively related to intention to engage in risky activities (Dospert), to risky choices in the CCT and in the BART; and to preference for delayed rewards in inter-temporal choices.

Lucia Mannetti

Full professor, Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, Sapienza University, Rome Italy

Ambra Brizi

Postoctoral Researcher, Department of Moleclar Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy

Mauro Giacomantonio

Assistant professor, Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy

Ilaria Bufalari

Assistant professor, Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy

Birga Schumpe

Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Psyhcology, New York University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Angelo Panno

Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Education, Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy

221/14302 No cure for correspondent inference: Discounting trait inferences when situational explanation activates the trait

Three studies suggest that people make correspondent inference and neglect the situational explanatory role when the competing causal account of the behavior also activates the trait, as in the case of psychological disorder diagnosis.

Sofia Jacinto

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal & Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, USA

Marina Ferreira

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

João Braga

Pos-Doc Researcher, Faculty of Psychology, University of Lisbon. Faculty of Human Sciences, Universidade Católica Portuguesa. Portugal

Anne Krendl

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, USA

Mário Ferreira

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

221/14303 A bad deed is more revealing when you're powerless: Inferring traits about powerful/less others

When asked to make trait inferences about targets with high or low power (study 1) and control (study 2), participants inferred more negative traits about powerless targets. A third study suggests the results do reflect inferences and not merely stereotypes.

Filipa de Almeida

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal & Faculty of Brain Sciences, University College London, UK

Diana Orghian

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal & Psychology Department, Harvard University, USA

Sofia Jacinto

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal & Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, USA

Ana Santos

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

Leonel Garcia-Marques

Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

221/14305 The faces of person and face perception models: Dominance and competence diverge in face evaluation

In two studies (N=189) we employ a reverse correlation approach to test the overlap between the fundamental dimensions of social cognition and the two primary dimensions of face evaluation. Results suggest divergence across models between the dominance and competence dimensions.

Manuel Oliveira

William James Centre for Research, ISPA-IU, Lisboa, Portugal & Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Utrecht University, Nederlands

Teresa Garcia-Marques

William James Centre for Research, ISPA-IU, Lisboa, Portugal

Ron Dotsch

Utrecht University, The Netherlands

221/17902 The Cultural Boundaries of Perspective-Taking: When and Why Perspective-Taking Reduces Stereotyping

The effect of perspective-taking on stereotyping may differ across cultures. We find that perspective-taking reduces stereotyping among Americans but not among Singaporeans, with this difference explained by relational mobility. Our paper demonstrates when perspective-taking does not strengthen social bonds.

Shihchia Cynthia Wang

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Management. Oklahoma State University. United States

Margaret Lee

Psychologist. Department of Organizational Behavior. London Business School. United Kingdom

Gillian Ku

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Organizational Behavior. London Business School. United Kingdom

Angela Leung

Psychologist. Associate Professor.School of Social Sciences. Singapore Management University. Singapure

221/17903 When perspective taking backfires: The role of negative stereotype confirmation

We examined whether the stereotypicality of a target influenced the extent to which perspective takers stereotype. Across four experiments, perspective taking with an ambiguous target decreased stereotyping, but perspective taking with a target that confirmed negative stereotypes increased stereotyping.

Jeanine Skorinko

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Social Science & Policy Studies. Worcester Polytechnic Institute. United States

Stacey Sinclair

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. Princeton University. United States.

221/17904 Identifying the psychophysiological basis of perspective taking and boundary conditions of perspectives taking’s prosocial consequences

We examined the psychophysiological basis of perspective taking and tested its relation to helping behavior. Perspective taking is experienced as challenge by the perspective taker and it only increases helping behavior for sad but not for angry or disgusted individuals.

Claudia Sassenrath

Psychologist. PhD. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology and Education. Ulm University. Germany

Michael Wagner

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Insitute of Psychology and Education. Ulm University. Germany

Johannes Keller

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology and Education. Ulm University. Germany

Intergroup relations

221/1009 Intergroup anxiety and inclusion of animals in the self in the context of human-animal contacts.

We conducted a cross-sectional study among 240 Canadians. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that contact with pets predicted more positive attitudes toward animals in general through greater inclusion of animals in the self and lower intergroup anxiety toward animals.

Bèatrice Auger

Doctoral Student. University of Quebec in Montreal. Montreal, Qc. Canada.

Catherine Amiot

Professor. University of Quebec in Montreal. Montreal, Qc. Canada

221/1012 Enhancing trust in refugees: The effect of an independent third person’s communication

Stereotype-inconsistent communication enhanced locals’ trust in refugees, but only when the communicator was psychologically close to the locals. In this case, negation of stereotypic content (but not affirmation of counter-stereotypic content) led to more trust the lower NCC was.

Kevin Winter

Psychologist. PhD student. Social Processes Lab. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM). Tübingen. Germany.

Kai Sassenberg

Psychologist. Professor. Social Processes Lab. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM). Tübingen. Germany.

Florian Landkammer

Psychologist. PostDoc. Social Processes Lab. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM). Tübingen. Germany.

221/1021 A Foot in Both Camps: How Intergroup Leaders are Evaluated as Functions of their Identity and Subgroup Relations

Competent leadership exerted in an entity is achieved through embodying the relevant social identities and intergroup leadership. Findings suggested that a leader’s attribute, intergroup relation, and individual's identity-centrality of their in-group have multiplier effects on their assessment of the leader.

Lillian But

Graduate Student, Division of Behavioral and Organizational Sciences - Social Psychology Department, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, United States

Michael Hogg

Professor, Division of Behavioral and Organizational Sciences - Social Psychology Department, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, United States

221/1030 Understanding the impact of the Hajj: Increased positive intergroup attitudes at a religious mass gathering

A survey of 1176 pilgrims at the Hajj, Mecca, found that perceived support predicted self-reported positive change in intergroup attitudes through social identification, supporting a contact explanation. Positive experience and exhaustion indirectly predicted attitudes, suggesting the role of emotional experience.

John Drury

Reader in Social Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, UK

Hani Alnabulsi

School of Psychology, University of Sussex, UK, and Department of Urban Design, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Institute for Hajj Research, Umm Al-Qura University, Mecca, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Vivian L. Vignoles

Reader in Social Psychology , School of Psychology, University of Sussex, UK

Sander Oogink Oogink

Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel, Netherlands

221/1032 Penalized for Professional Development? Social Dominance Orientation Moderates Reactions to Beneficiaries of Minority Outreach and Training Programs

This paper examines the spillover effect that affiliations with training and outreach programs (programs that provide professional training and/or resources to members of underrepresented minority groups) have on its members. Across a set of studies, we show that social dominance orientation (SDO) is negatively related to evaluations of underrepresented group members who are affiliated with training and outreach programs.

Miguel Unzueta

Associate Professor of Management. University of California, Los Angeles. USA.

Safiya Castel

Doctoral Student in Management. University of California, Los Angeles. USA.

221/1034 Support for dominance or antiegalitarianism? The examination of the new social dominance orientation scale (SDO7)

We examined the factors of the new social dominance orientation scale (SDO7): opposition to equality and group-based dominance. They relate to different kind of prejudice and predict attitudes toward specific outgroups (Roma, Jews, migrants, homeless, gay/lesbian and overweight people) differently.

Laura Faragó

PhD student. Doctoral School of Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

Anna Kende

Associate professor. Department of Social Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

221/1095 Changing mind can change the perception of history?

The studies examine the question whether complexity of thinking can overwrite the group identity demands leading to different perception of history. Results show connection between ego-identity status and national identity and their effect on history perception, however complexity of thinking did not influence the narrative construction of historical events.

Orsolya Vincze

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, University of Pecs, Hungary

221/1101 Female and Male Leaders - Leader Evaluation and Team Cohesiveness in the Process of Team Development

We examined how gender stereotypes impact leaders’ evaluations in team development process. We found women to be evaluated more favorably than men at the beginning of the project (not at the end), and they built more cohesive teams over time.

Agnieszka Pietraszkiewicz

PostDoc Researcher, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology and Social Neuroscience, University of Bern, Switzerland

Núria Rovira-Asenjo

Psychologist, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain

Sabine Sczesny

Professor, Institute of Psychology, Social Psychology and Social Neuroscience, University of Bern, Switzerland

Tània Gumí

Lecturer professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain

Roger Guimerà

ICREA Research Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain

Marta Sales-Pardo

Associate Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering,Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain

221/1124 Navigating Race in a Diverse Environment

We examined how living in a racially-diverse environment influenced daily race-related intergroup behaviors via experience-sampling. We found greater exposure to racially-diverse others was related to more interracial interactions, using race in daily conversations, and comfort in talking about race-related topics.

Chanel Meyers

Graduate Student. University of Hawaii at Manoa. Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

Kristin Pauker

Associate Professor. University of Hawaii at Manoa. Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

221/1141 Does it take a hijab to dehumanize a muslim woman? Comparing Muslim and non-Muslims stereotype of veiled muslim women

Studied the perception of the hijab among non-Muslim Belgians and Muslim migrants. Veiled but not unveiled women were perceived as less human by the non-Muslim than by the Muslim group.

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

Zeinab Mehzer

Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium

Robin Wollast

Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium

221/1142 Measuring Ageism in Children: Current and Future Directions

There are mixed findings in the literature regarding the existence of ageism among children which have been linked with the lack of uniformity of the measures used. In this study we present a systematic literature review of the available measures.

Joana Mendonça

ISCTE - IUL (Lisbon University Institute)

Sibila Marques

Assistant Professor. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. School of Social Sciences. ISCTE-IUL (Lisbon University Institute)

221/1143 Individual and Interpersonal Predictors of Attitudes toward Lesbians, Gays, and Transgender People: A Focus on Perspective Taking

We used path analysis to test a model in which political orientation (study 1 and 2) and right-wing authoritarianism (study 2) predicted attitudes toward gays, lesbians, and transpeople via contact quantity, contact quality, and perspective taking.

Lauren Coursey

University of Texas at Arlington

Jared Kenworthy

University of Texas at Arlington

Craig Nagoshi

University of Texas at Arlington

Brock Rozich

University of Texas at Arlington

Mark Frame

Middle Tennessee State University

221/1147 Stigma and Social Support in Substance Abuse: Implications for Mental Health and Well-Being

Individuals with substance abuse suffer from severe public and internalised stigma. We examined how perceived stigma influences individuals in treatment for substance abuse, and whether internalised stigma and shame are mechanisms which link social support with better health and well-being.

Michèle Denise Birtel

Lecturer in Psychology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom

Lisa Wood

Clinical Psychologist, Inpatient and Acute Directorate, North East London NHS Foundation Trust, Ilford, United Kingdom

Nancy J. Kempa

Psychologist, School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

221/1182 School as a zero-sum game between boys and girls: gender differences in perceptions.

We examined whether students perceived school as a zero-sum competitive game between boys and girls. As expected, in a threatening gender competition context when exposed to outgroup achievement, boys endorsed gender zero-sum beliefs more strongly, whereas girls did not.

Alyson Sicard

Doctoral students. Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive. CNRS UMR 6024.Université Clermont Auvergne.

Delphine Martinot

Professor of social psychology. Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive. CNRS UMR 6024. Université Clermont Auvergne.

221/1188 Gender stereotype-consistent memories and behaviors in contexts of high system-dependency

Two studies illustrate that motivation to justify the system (i.e., in contexts triggering feelings of higher system dependency) impacts people’s behaviors and autobiographical memories in complementary gender-stereotyped academic domains (i.e., verbal and math domains).

Virginie Bonnot

Associate Professor, Laboratoire de Psychologie sociale, Université Paris Descartes, France

Silvia Krauth-Gruber

Associate Professor, Laboratoire de Psychologie sociale, Université Paris Descartes, France

221/1213 Collective guilt norms and present-day intergroup relations in the light of France’s colonial past.

The present study shows that injunctive and descriptive guilt norms regarding France’s colonial past may prevent people to feel any other negative group-based emotion and may contribute to uphold the negative relationships with the former colonized

Silvia Krauth-Gruber

Social psychologist, associate professor, psychology department, social psychology lab, Paris Descartes University, France

Virginie Bonnot

Social psychologist, associate professor, psychology department, social psychology lab, Paris Descartes University, France

221/1215 Recommendations for Female Sterilization: Examining the Role of Patients’ Age and Race

Patient race/ethnicity impacted the contraception recommendations made by medical students. Specifically, older women from a lower-status race/ethnic group (Micronesian) were more likely to receive sterilization recommendations vs. White women. This research highlights promoting patient-centered, unbiased care to reduce health disparities.

Amanda Williams

Lecturer, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, UK

Kasey Kajiwara

Chief Resident, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, USA

Bliss Kaneshiro

Assistant Professor, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, USA

221/1228 Group rights in liberal societies: Group membership and perceived compatibility between individual and collective justice

Two studies show that low-status and subordinate (but not minority) groups perceive greater compatibility between liberal-individualist and collective group-based principles of justice. These findings shed new light on asymmetric intergroup dynamics underlying minority rights, affirmative action and collective justice.

Jessica Gale

Assistante doctorante, Social Psychology Lab, Institute of Psychology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

Christian Staerkle

Associate Professor, Social Psychology Lab, Institute of Psychology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

221/1253 Power and Morality: The influence of power on judgment of moral rule violations

Two studies tested whether the influence of power on acceptance of moral rule violations is moderated by the actor and beneficiary of the rule violation. Mixed results suggest that effects might depend on the context of the rule violation.

Michael Wenzler

Psychologist. PhD-Student. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien. Tübingen. Germany.

Annika Scholl

Psychologist. Post-Doc. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien. Tübingen. Germany.

Kai Sassenberg

Psychologist. Professor. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien. Tübingen. Germany.

221/1256 Perceived outgroup entitativity as a moderator of intergroup contact effects

We introduce perceived entitativity as a moderator of contact effects. Cross-sectional survey-data indicated that higher entitativity was associated with stronger contact effects. Furthermore, experimentally raising participants’ perception of entitativity increased the generalization of contact effects only for high-status respondents.

Sybille Neji

Psychologist. University of Hagen. Institute of Psychology. Department Research Methods and Evaluation.Germany.

Oliver Christ

Psychologist. Professor. University of Hagen. Institute of Psychology. Department Research Methods and Evaluation.Germany. Hagen.

221/1259 Ostracism, humanity attributions, and social categorization

Two studies were conducted using the Cyberball game. The aim was to explore whether ostracizers’ group membership moderates the effects of ostracism on humanity self-perceptions. No moderation effect of ostracizers’ belonging was revealed. Findings support Williams’ temporal model of ostracism.

Dora Capozza

Full Professor. Section of Applied Psychology - FISPPA Department. University of Padova. Italy

Jessica Boin

PhD Student. Section of Applied Psychology - FISPPA Department. University of Padova. Italy.

Gian Antonio Di Bernardo

Post-Doc Fellow. Department of Education and Human Sciences. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Italy.

Rossella Falvo

Associate Professor. Section of Applied Psychology - FISPPA Department. University of Padova. Italy.

221/1266 Explaining violence around the world: A model of Climate, Aggression, and Self-control in Humans (CLASH)

Why are there large between- and within-country differences in aggression and violence worldwide? Adopting a life history framework, our model of CLimate, Aggression, and Self-control in Humans (CLASH) seeks to explain differences in aggression and violence based on climate differences.

Maria Isabela Rinderu

Research Assistant, Faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences, Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, VU Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Paul Van Lange

Head of Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences, VU Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Brad Bushman

Professor of Communication and Psychology, School of Communication, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A

221/1283 Identification with Europe and the legitimacy of resources distribution across European countries

One experiment shows that European identification affects the perceived legitimacy of providing financial help to other countries as a function of a) their membership in the EU, and b) the normative principle (solidarity or charity) underlying the request for help.

Carolina Barros

Research Assistant, Center for Research and Social Intervention, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

Denis Sindic

Research Fellow, Centre for Investigation and Social Intervention, ISCTE-IUL, Lisbon, Portugal

Mariline Justo

Research Assistant, Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

221/1293 When bystanders care: an instrumental motive for supporting collective action

We study the role of bystanders on the legitimization of social protests as they also contribute to social change. Results show that group efficacy mediates the effect of social identification and social change beliefs on the legitimacy of collective action

Gloria Jimenez-Moya

PhD in Social Psychology, Assistant Professor, School of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Daniel Miranda

Sociologist. PhD Candidate. Instituto de Sociología. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago. Chile

John Drury

Psychologist. Professor. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. UK

Patricio Saavedra Morales

Psychologist. PhD Candidate. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. UK

Robero Gonzalez

Psychologist. Professor. Escuela de Psicologia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago. Chile

221/1294 Intellectual helplessness as a long-term consequence of stereotype threat in language achievement

Chronic stereotype threat affects language achievement in highly identified with their gender group boys through both intellectual helplessness and working memory while the relation between chronic stereotype threat and domain identification was mediated only by intellectual helplessness.

Sylwia Bedyńska

Psychologist. Institute of General Psychology. SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities. Warsaw. Poland

Grzegorz Sedek

Interdisciplinary Center of Applied Cognitive Research, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland

221/1314 Legitimizing gender discrimination in the workplace: the mediating role of perceived threat to family

Drawing on the role of symbolic threat in intergroup relations and the justification of discrimination, we hypothesized that perceived threat to family mediates the relationship between prejudice and opposition to women’s career. Analyses conducted on representative national samples support this view.

Catherine Verniers

Psychologist, Assistant Professor, Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale: Menaces et Société, Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France

Jorge Vala

Research Professor, Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

221/1315 Contact hypothesis: longitudinal examination of the role of threats, empathy and national identity

The study examined the contact hypothesis among adolescents and the psychological mechanisms involved in the process. Importantly, contact-prejudice direction depended on the ethnic target group. Contact hypothesis also mediated by threats and empathy, while it was moderated by national identity.

Vasiliki Tsolia

Psychologist. PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Cyprus. Nicosia. Cyprus.

Vasiliki Tsolia

Psychologist. PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Cyprus. Nicosia. Cyprus

221/1367 Does religion matter? Swedish Majority attitudes towards Muslim and Christian Immigrants’ acculturation preferences

Experimental research examined majority attitudes towards Muslim and Christian immigrants. Results showed that majority favoured Christians who ‘integrated’. No clear preference was identified with respect to Muslim immigrants. Replication of study revealed a different pattern, demonstrating a more complex picture.

Maria Olsson

PhD student. Department of Psychology. UiT The Arctic University of Norway. Tromsø. Norway.

Camilla Matera

Psychologist. Dr. University of Florence. Florence. Italy.

Linda Tip

Psychologist. Dr. University of Sussex. Sussex. England.

Rupert Brown

Psychologist. Professor. University of Sussex. Sussex. England.

221/1522 When in Rome, do as the Romans do? A discursive approach on attitudes towards multiculturalism.

Two studies on evaluations of multiculturalism were conducted among the Finnish majority and different immigrant groups. As a result, a discursively oriented approach on studying attitudes towards multiculturalism is proposed, which would allow a critical examination of intergroup power relations.

Emma Nortio

Doctoral Student, Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Sirkku Varjonen

Post-doctoral researcher, Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Tuuli Anna Mähönen

University Lecturer, Open university, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Inga Jasinskaja-Lahti

Professor, Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

221/1527 Predicting Out-Group Dating Preferences: A Cross-Cultural Comparison between the United States, United Kingdom, and India

The present study explored out-group dating preference across three cultural groups (UK, US, India) and out-group backgrounds (race/culture/ethnicity, religious, socio-economic status) and found differences and similarities in dating preferences and the social psychological factors that predict these dating preferences.

Courtney Allen

PhD Student, University of Kent, School of Psychology, Canterbury, Kent, United Kingdom

221/1533 You are less than human also and we are afraid of you: dehumanization and anxiety as mediators between metadehumanization and its impact on negative attitudes towards Muslims

The idea that dehumanization is separate from prejudice and is responsible for intergroup aggression has been already established and is known in classical psychology works. Proposed in 2016 by Nour Kteily and collegues concept of metadehumanization is waiting for empirical verification. We propose a replication of their second study, with additional mediator of relationship between dehumanization and aggresive attitudes towards Muslims - social threat.

Natalia Frankowska

Psychologist, Institute of Personality Psychology, Univeristy of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland.

Wieslaw Baryla

Psychologist, Institute of Social Psychology, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sopot, Poland.

221/1624 Intergroup contact and solidarity-based collective action with refugees in Greece

In a Greek sample we tested the associations of positive and negative contact with solidarity-based collective action supporting refugees. Positive contact, and to a lesser extent negative contact, predicted solidarity-based collective action through outgroup empathy, group-based anger, and perceived injustice.

Zafer Ozkan

PhD student in Social Psychology, School of Psychology, the University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom

Kristof Dhont

Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, the University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom

221/1795 RWA and SDO Differentially Affect Inference of Personality Traits of Ingroup and Outgroup Members

We examined (study with N = 251) how RWA and SDO affects inference of personality traits from a series short ambiguous stories. RWA promoted ascription positive traits to the ingroup whereas SDO promoted ascription of negative traits to the outgroup.

Marek BŁAŻEWICZ

Institute for Social Studies, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

Mirosław Kofta

Psychology Faculty, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

221/15401 Hostile sexism and gender as predictors of sexist humour perceived offensiveness

Gender and hostile sexism (HS) predict the perceived offensiveness of sexist humour. Furthermore, women with lower levels of HS reported more negative feelings and a greater willingness to express discontent about sexist humour.

Catalina Argüello

Researcher, Department of Methodology for Behavioral Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Vanessa Smith-Castro

Researcher, Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas (IIP), University of Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica

Hugo Carretero-Dios

Professor, Department of Methodology for Behavioral Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

221/15402 The impact of sexist humour on women’s ingroup identification, self-esteem and coping

Women exposed to sexist jokes did not report reduced self-esteem or ingroup identification despite finding sexist jokes offensive (Experiment 1). In Experiment 2, women exposed to sexist jokes again did not report reduced self-esteem but increased ingroup identification and coping.

Manuela Thomae

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Winchester, Winchester, United Kingdom

Thomas E. Page

Postdoctoral Research Associate, School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom

Afroditi Pina

Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom

221/15403 Effects of motivation on the relation between sexist humor exposure and rape proclivity

Two experiments analyzed the effects of type of motivation (autonomy versus control) and sexist humour on men`s self-reported rape proclivity. Participants’ HS was also included as a possible moderator of this effect.

Mónica Romero-Sánchez

Professor, Department of Social Psychology, University of Granada, Grandada, Spain

Hugo Carretero-Dios

Professor, Department of Methodology for Behavioral Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Jesús L Megías

Professor, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

221/18104 Belief in School Meritocracy as an Ideological Barrier to the Promotion of Equality

Two studies; 202 participants (100 undergraduate students in Study 1; 102 parents in Study 2)

Céline Darnon

Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France

Annique Smeding

Université Savoie Mont-Blanc, France

Sandrine Redersdorff

Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France

221/18105 Re-establishing the social-class order in school: restorative reactions against high-achieving, low-SES pupils

This research examines an important barrier faced by low-SES pupils on an upward social mobility trajectory: resistance to their high achievement. Our results indicated that evaluators cognitively and behaviourally undermined the achievement of high-achieving low-SES students.

Anatolia Batruch

Université de Lausanne, Switzerland

Frédérique Autin

Université de Poitiers, France

Fabrizio Butera

Université de Lausanne, Switzerland

Attitudes, emotion and motivation

221/1023 The Necessary and Sufficient Causes of Moral Judgment: Intent, Outcome and Foreknowledge

We investigated the impact of harmful/helpful intent, good/bad outcomes, and moral foreknowledge on moral judgments. Across a variety of moral situations, we found that moral foreknowledge was a unique, and often the strongest, predictor of moral judgment, especially with victimless acts.

Christine Reyna

Professor, Department of Psychology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL, USA

Russell Steiger

Psychologist, graduate student, DePaul University, Chicago, IL USA

Geoffrey Wetherell

Psychologist, Assistant Professor, Valparaiso University, Indiana, USA

Or'Shaundra Benson

Psychologist, Assistant Professor, College of DuPage, Illinois, USA

Anthony Washburn

Psychologist, Graduate Student, University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, IL USA

221/1029 The face of research: What first impressions do people form of scientists?

Two studies illustrated that social dimensions play different roles in defining “good” versus “interesting” scientists: “good” scientists were perceived as more competent, but less physically attractive, while “interesting” scientists were perceived as both more competent and attractive.

Ana Ioana Gheorghiu

Psychologist. PhD Student. University of Essex. Colchester. United Kingdom.

William J. Matthews

Psychologist. Senior Lecturer (Dr.). University of Cambridge. Cambridge. United Kingdom.

Mitchell Callan

Psychologist. Professor. University of Essex. Colchester. United Kingdom.

221/1033 Self-licensing and its secondary effects: An ecological momentary assessment study of food temptations

The mechanism underlying self-licensing effects and its consequences for ensuing self-regulation of eating behavior were examined in a momentary assessment study (N = 138). The outcomes imply that self-licensing can also support successful self-regulation.

Sosja Prinsen

Utrecht

Catharine Evers

Associate Professor; Department of Social, Health & Behavioral Psychology; Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

Leoniek Wijngaards

Associate Professor; Department of Methodology & Statistics; Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

Renée van Vliet

Student, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Denise de Ridder

Professor; Department of Social, Health & Behavioral Psychology; Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

221/1049 The Social Construction of the Individual's Culture of Giving: Applying the Theory of Planned Behaviour

The study aims at understanding charity for education among people belonging to different social classes. Based on data from a representative sociological survey it applies the TPB and identifies the factors that stimulate or hamper its practice.

Kristina Petkova

social psychologist. professor, Institute for the study of societies and knowledge, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria

Pepka Boyadjieva

sociologist, professor, Institute for the Study of Societies and Knowledge, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria

Valeri Todorov

psychologist, associated professor, Academy of the Ministry of Interior, Sofia, Bulgaria

Velina Topalova

sociologist, associated professor, Institute for the Study of Societies and Knowledge, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria

221/1062 Shared Gratitude and Shared Debt: reported gratitude and debt according to number of beneficiaries and benefactor entitativity.

We investigated whether the number of simultaneous beneficiaries and whether the benefactor is a human being or an abstract entity such as the governement has an effect on reported gratitude and debt.

Sergio Barbosa

Psychologist, PhD candidate, Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá - Colombia).

Julian Acosta

Psychology student, Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá - Colombia).

Cristian Corredor

Psychology student, Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá - Colombia).

María José Costa Noguera

Psychology student, Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá - Colombia).

William Jiménez Leal

Associate professor, Psychology Department, School of Social Sciences, Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá - Colombia).

Andrés Molano

Assistant professor, School of Education, Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá - Colombia).

221/1065 Fuming with Rage! Do members of low status groups express anger more than members of high status groups?

Lay people often associate low status groups with anger and high status groups with calm. Here, we refute this stereotype, showing that a sense of one's low status motivates anger suppression, while a sense of high status dis-inhibits anger expression.

Chuma Owuamalam

Assistant Professor. School of Psychology. University of Nottingham. Malaysia campus in Semenyih. Malaysia.

Mark Rubin

Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology, The University of Newcastle, Australia. Canberra. Australia

221/1071 Validation of the Portrait Values Questionnaire in Argentina

The objective of this study is to validate the Portrait Values Questionnaire of Schwartz (PVQ-21 and PVQ-40) versions by assessing the configurational verification (MDS) and the confirmatory structure of higher values of Schwartz´s model (CFA) in Argentinean context.

Maite Regina Bermanedi

School of Psychology, University Of Buenos Aires

Elena Mercedes Zubieta

School of Psychology, University of Buenos Aires

221/1081 The effect of reactive emotions expressed in response to another’s anger on inferences of social power

Targets of other’s expressions of anger may respond to it emotionally. These responses serve as signals of confirmation or disconfirmation of the high power suggested by the anger and determine the perceived social power of expressers of anger.

Shlomo Hareli

Social psychologist, Department of Business Administration, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel

Shlomo David

Social psychologist, The laboratory for the study of social perception of emotions, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel

Ursula Hess

Social and organizational psychologist, Department of Psychology, Humboldt-University, Berlin, Germany

221/1083 The influence of another person’s emotion expressions on situation perception

Research on the relationship between context and facial expressions generally assumes a unidirectional effect of context on expressions. The present research tested and found strong support for a reverse effect of emotion expression on the interpretation of scenes.

Ursula Hess

Psychologist. Professor. Humboldt-University of Berlin

Shlomo Hareli

Psychologist. Professor. University of Haifa

221/1098 International Aid: Right-Wing Authoritarians conform to leadership helping norms, Social Dominance Orientation motivates ineffective helping

Two studies (N=583) examine how Social Dominance Orientation (SDO), Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA), and contextual factors affect outgroup helping through donations. RWAs donate more when they perceive higher government Aid, suggesting conformity to leadership norms. High SDOs prefer ineffective helping strategies.

Cassandra Chapman

PhD Candidate. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Winnifred Louis

Associate Professor. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Barbara M. Masser

Associate Professor. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/1120 Is hand-hygiene a spontaneous type of behavior? – Habit as relevant determinant of hand-hygiene behavior

We argue that hand-hygiene, an important behavior in health care, is an automatic rather than deliberative type of behavior. We tested habit as well as knowledge and attitude regarding hand-hygiene and found consistent evidence to support this notion.

Svenja Diefenbacher

Social Scientist. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology and Education. Ulm University. Ulm. Germany.

Johannes Keller

Social Scientist. Professor. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology and Education. Ulm University. Ulm. Germany.

221/1144 An Implicit Self-Compassion Training: Its Effects On Self-Critical Tendencies

This study investigated whether one could implicitly train self-critical individuals to "approach self-compassion" using an Approach-Avoidance Training and if this task would have an effect on how participants imagined they would think and react after 3 socially distressing scenarios.

Isabelle Almgren-Dore

Graduate student, Social Psychology, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Canada

Stéphane Dandeneau

Professor, Social Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Canada

221/1152 Mental Contrasting of Counterfactual Fantasies Engages People in Current Reality

Mentally contrasting fantasies about a lost counterfactual past with current reality helps people let go from the counterfactual past when expectations to attain it are low. Four studies showed that mentally contrasting counterfactual fantasies engages people in their current reality.

Nora Rebekka Krott

Ph.D. candidate in Psychology. Department of Educational Psychology and Motivation. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.

221/1178 From Guilt to Reparation : Exploring the Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Guilt

Guilt promotes reparation. However, the processes underlying this effect remain unclear. Four studies tested potential underlying mechanisms. Results suggest that guilt increases attention toward reparation-oriented cues and render these primes more positive. Implications for a better knowledge of guilt are discussed.

Aurélien GRATON

Associate Researcher, University of Bordeaux, France

François Ric

Full Professor. University of Bordeaux, France.

221/1181 Moral norms and emotions affecting protected sex in women from different sociocultural contexts

Three experimental studies in different countries (Italy, Spain, Netherlands) showed the role of moral norms and emotions in promoting safe sex among women with/without past casual sex experience, suggesting that interventions aimed at fostering condom use should be tailored carefully.

Camilla Matera

Department of Education and Psychology, University of Florence

Amanda Nerini

Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence

Cristina Stefanile

Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence

221/1197 The combination of affective reactions and their impact on choice: integral affect and decision-making

We show that multiple, affect-evoking pieces of information combine into a single affective reaction that guides choice. This combination follows the rules of averaging and appears only in specific presentation styles of a decision situation.

Emir Efendic

Sarajevo

Saša Drače

University of Sarajevo, Faculty of Philosophy, Department of Psychology

François Ric

University of Bordeaux, Laboratory of Psychology EA4139

221/1200 Teachers’ classroom behaviors:
 The role of emotional sensitivity and cultural tolerance

The current study explored determinants of teachers’ behaviors towards pupils with different ethnic backgrounds. Our results suggest that emotion-related factors (emotional sensitivity) play a bigger role than cultural tolerance when explaining the difference in teacher behaviors.

Ceren Su Abacioglu

PhD candidate, Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Agneta H. Fischer

Professor, Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Monique L.L. Volman

Professor, Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

221/1206 Being angry or getting angry? How dynamic change in emotion can predict prosocial collective action

This study examines dynamic change processes in collective action. Employing dynamic mediation analyses, it uniquely examines how within-person change in emotion (e.g., getting angrier) predicts within-person change in action intentions (i.e., becoming more willing to take action) across time points.

Laura Nesbitt

PhD Candidate. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK.

Andrew Livingstone

Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Science. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK.

221/1212 A relational perspective of terrorist threat and social motives on implicit and explicit attitude change

Our experiment concerns people’s responses to terrorist advocacy. We found that the interaction between terrorist threat, social motivation and ideological orientation leads to implicit and explicit attitude change, and moderates people’s metacognitive abilities and choices of implicit persuasive strategies.

Anastasia Kordoni

Psychologist. Postgraduate. Department of Psychology. Lancaster University. Lancaster. United Kingdom.

Kathleen McCulloch

Psychologist. Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Lancaster University. Lancaster. United Kingdom.

221/1221 Relationship between headlines exposure and rape myth acceptance: The rape case of two argentinians in Ecuador

This study investigates the influence of rape myth acceptance and headline exposure about the murder and rape case of two argentinians in Ecuador, in social attitudes towards the victims. Results showed that mass media contributes to the perpetuation of rape myths and victim blame.

Mercedes Durán Segura

Psychologist. Professor. University of Seville. Spain

221/1223 Social value orientation and anticipated emotions in resource allocation decisions.

Anticipated emotions are often used to guide our decision making. We investigated the relation between Social Value Orientation (SVO), anticipated emotions and fair and unfair resource allocations. Results revealed that SVO influences anticipated emotions, and thereby shape allocation behaviour.

Suzanna Bono

PhD Student. School of Psychology. Cardiff University, Cardiff. United Kingdom.

Job van der Schalk

Lecturer. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. United Kingdom.

Antony Manstead

Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. United Kingdom.

221/1225 An investigation of the effects of mood and cognitive stimulation on different creativity tasks

The effects of cognitive stimulation and mood were investigated on two different creativity tasks. Mood and cognitive stimulation showed different effects on different tasks, proposing that modality of tasks influence the results.

Bedirhan Gültepe

Ph.D. candidate. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

Ahmet Yasin Şenyurt

Ph.D. candidate. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

Hamit COSKUN

Professor. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

Cantürk Akben

Ph.D. candidate. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

221/1232 Differential Effects of Abstract and Concrete Processing in Regulating Basic and Self-Conscious Emotions

We suggest that feeling guilt, a self-conscious emotion, involves more abstract representations of the eliciting event than feeling anger, a basic emotion. Consequently, concrete processing is more effective in regulating guilt whereas abstract processing is more effective in regulating anger.

Oren Bornstein

Psychologist. Ben-Gurion University. Israel

Tal Eyal

Psychologist. Ben-Gurion University. Israel

221/1254 Doing is for Feeling

In two experiments we show that preferences can be formed by transfer of valence from an US to an action and then from this valence-laden action to a novel CS even though the US and CS were never presented together.

Katarina Blask

Psychologist.Research Associate. Psychology Department. University of Trier. Trier. Germany

Christian Frings

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Trier. Trier. Germany.

Eva Walther

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Trier. Trier. Germany.

221/1271 Self-esteem moderates the impact of cigarette warnings labels on smoking intentions

Based on TMT, this research showed that the lower the smokers’ implicit self-esteem were, the less intentions they had to quit smoking when their senses of mortality salience were heightened (after watching cigarette on-pack warnings concerning smoking causing death).

Hung Yu Lin

Psychologist. Associate professor. Department of Psychology. Fo Guang University. Taiwan. R.O.C.

Lun-Ting Wang

Master student. Department of Psychology. Fo Guang University. Taiwan. R.O.C.

Sheng-Hsiang Yu

Psychologist, Assistant professor. Department of Psychology. Fo Guang University. Taiwan. R.O.C.

221/1274 Elaboration Likelihood Model and anticipated negative emotions predict implicit attitude toward sustainable transport

The interactions between degree of involvement and, respectively, argument quality and source expertise influence implicit attitude toward sustainable means of transport, as predicted by the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM, Petty & Cacioppo, 1981). Anticipated negative emotions also play a role.

Sara Manca

Post-Doc in Social and Environmental Psychology. Department of Education, Psychology, Philosophy. University of Cagliari. Cagliari. Italy.

Ferdinando Fornara

Senior Researcher and Lecturer in Social and Environmental Psychology. Department of Education, Psychology, Philosophy. University of Cagliari. Cagliari. Italy.

221/1275 THE RE-CO-KIT: A (cognitive motivational) reality construction kit

This poster presents an individual level, cognitive motivational approach on how individuals actively construct differing “realities” in times of access to unlimited information. It represents an innovative combination of Social Constructivism, Uses and Gratifications Approach and Cognitive Dissonance Theory.

Daniel Geschke

Psychologist, Institute of Democracy and Civil Society, Jena, Germany

221/1277 Mapping Moral Values and Intuitive Processing of Moral Conflict

Using a novel tradeoff task requiring quick intuitive choices between moral values, we explore whether explicit deliberated moral values predict intuitive responses and response times; and whether these patterns are moderated by availability of cognitive resources.

Amrita Ahluwalia

Psychologist. PhD Candidate. School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. United Kingdom.

Calum Marr

Psychologist. MSc Candidate. School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. United Kingdom..

Adam Moore

Psychologist. Lecturer. School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. United Kingdom.

221/1279 No Pleasure, no Passion: A look at Non-Passionate Individuals

This study investigated the differences in pleasure in life of passionate versus non-passionate individuals. Findings suggest that, compared to passionate individuals, non-passionate people engage less in a search for pleasurable experiences and experience less pleasure when they engage in activities.

Ariane St-Louis

Université du Québec à Montréal

Léa Bragoli-Barzan

Université du Québec à Montréal

Robert J. Vallerand

Université du Québec à Montréal

221/1280 Measuring Prosocial Behaviors: Cross-national Validation of the Prosociality Scale in Chile, China, Italy, Spain, and the United States

This research investigated the psychometric properties of the Prosociality Scale and its cross-cultural validation and generalizability across five different western and non-western countries (Chile, China, Italy, Spain, and the U.S.) The scale measure a global tendency to behave in prosocial ways during late adolescence and adulthood.

B. Paula Luengo Kanacri

Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Nancy Eisenberg

Arizona State University

Maria Giovanna Caprara

Department of Psychology & Health, Open University of Madrid

Gloria Jimenez-Moya

PhD in Social Psychology, Assistant Professor, School of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

221/1282 Decision to abort negatively affects perceived women’s professional competence through a reduction of human nature

Italian undergraduates expressed their attitudes towards a woman who did or did not abort. Decision to abort elicited higher moral outrage, and minor attribution of humanness. Negative impact on perception of workplace competence was mediated by attributed human nature traits.

Maria Giuseppina Pacilli

Associate professor. Department of Scienze Politiche. University of Perugia. Perugia. Italy

Ilaria Giovannelli

Ph.D. Student Department of Scienze Politiche. University of Perugia. Perugia. Italy

Federica Spaccatini

Ph.D. Student Department of Scienze Politiche. University of Perugia. Perugia. Italy

221/1284 Having and Being as Self-Regulation: Implications for Motivation and Construal Level

In seven studies, participants listed their having- vs. being-goals and evaluated them on several dimensions. Having-goals appeared more concrete, closer and easier to obtain than being-goals. However, being-goals were judged to be more important, more fun, and more motivating.

Jens Förster

Ruhr Universität Bochum

221/1292 How do we “see” the refugees?: Intergroup processes and attitudes towards refugees in Ireland

We surveyed 135 Irish adults about anti-refugee prejudices (affective, ideological and behavioural). Human identity reduced prejudice, via the mediation of perceived threat, intergroup disgust sensitivity and right-wing authoritarianism. Mediation mechanisms varied depending on the different indicators of prejudice.

Elaine Smith

PhD candidate, Department of Psychology, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

Anca Minescu

Lecturer in Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

221/1298 The candidates' distribution in an organization depends on their gender? Egalitarian goal effect on gender stereotypes.

The study aim was to activate egalitarian goals temporarily and evaluate its effect on stereotype application. The role of sex and SDO was also analyzed. The results showed that the goal triggered specific compensatory responses that avoid the stereotype application.

María Aranda

Psychologist. University of Jaén. Jaén. Spain

Beatriz Montes-Berges

Psychologist. University of Jaén. Jaén. Spain

221/1301 Problem gambling severity moderates the relation of personal relative deprivation and gambling urges: A meta-analysis

Resentment stemming from the belief that one is deprived of a deserved outcome compared to what others have is related to gambling urges. Combined data from 8 studies showed this relation was stronger among those with more severe gambling problems.

Nathaniel Will Shead

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, Canada

Mitch Callan

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom

James Olson

Department of Psychology, Western University, London, Canada

221/1302 Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions (MCII) Supports People to Attain Their Goal of Being Unique

The need for uniqueness is known as the striving for differentness relative to other people. In three studies the self-regulation strategy of MCII (vs. indulging or no-treatment) supported people to attain goals of uniqueness in specific areas of their lives.

Vivica Riess

Institute of Psychology. Educational Psychology and Motivation. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.

Gabriele Oettingen

Professor.Institute of Psychology. Educational Psychology and Motivation. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.

221/1303 The Role of Passion in Emotion Regulation and Well-Being: A Look at Romantic Relationships

This study examined the role of romantic passion in emotion regulation and well-being. HP positively predicted reappraisal and negatively predicted suppression. OP positively predicted suppression and was unrelated to reappraisal. Reappraisal positively predicted well-being, whereas suppression was unrelated to it.

Maylys Rapaport

Student. Research Laboratory on Social Behavior (RLSB). Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Montréal, Canada Montréal.

Ariane St-Louis

Student. Research Laboratory on Social Behavior (RLSB). Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Montréal, Canada.

Robert J. Vallerand

Professor. Research Laboratory on Social Behavior (RLSB). Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Montréal, Canada.

221/1308 Passion toward environmentalism: Changing people’s passion for a cause can reduce violent extremism.

Following a manipulation of harmonious (vs. obsessive passion), 115 participants reported their willingness to engage in mainstream and radical activism toward an environmental cause mediated by moral disengagement. Results shows how passion influences actions that activists take to further their cause.

Noëmie Nociti

PhD student, psychology, New York University, Abu Dhabi; Université du Québec à Montréal

Jocelyn J. Bélanger

Assistant Professor, New York University, Abu Dhabi

Stéphane Dandeneau

Associate Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada

221/1311 Can Death Liberate the Self? Reflecting upon Mortality as a Pathway to Authentic Motivation

Confronting the inevitability of death has the potential to instigate an intimate examination of one’s values and priorities. Visualizing and contemplating one’s death was found to cause less authentic individuals to increase their authentic motivation for personal life goals.

Andrew Arena

PhD (psychology). School of Psychology. The University of Sydney. Sydney. Australia.

Niko Tiliopoulos

Psychologist. Lecturer and Statistics Adviser. School of Psychology. The University of Sydney. Sydney. Australia.

221/1862 Implications of emotional experience and perceived competence on achievement in mathematics

The study examined the impact of emotions and self-evaluation on cognition generated by mathematics. Results revealed that emotions generated after the teacher announced a mathematics task impaired pupils’ achievement in that task, especially when they hold a low perceived competence in mathematics.

Natacha Boissicat

Associate professor, Education, Grenoble Alpes University, France

Michael Fartoukh

Professor Associate, Education, University of Nice, France

Jérémy Pouille

PhD, Education, Grenoble Alpes University, France

221/1866 Every-day moral courage. Processes of bystander intervention against norm violations

The intervention against a witnessed norm violation (moral courage) should be influenced by anticipated costs. In two studies, we tested whether cost-benefit analyses might be cognitively demanding (experiment) and therefore not relevant under every-day conditions (ambulatory assessment).

Anna Baumert

University Koblenz-Landau, MPI for Research on Collective Goods

Anna Halmburger

University Koblenz-Landau

Henriette Stürmer

University Koblenz-Landau

221/1900 The Value of Utopia

This study explored the link between Utopian visions and values. The overlap between both constructs turned out to be very limited. This suggests that the study of Utopian visions can shed new light on the social psychology of motivation, activism and idealism.

Carla Roos

Research master student in social psychology. Faculty of behavioural and social sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

Yoshihisa Kashima

Professor in social psychology. Melbourne school of psychological sciences. University of Melbourne. Melbourne. Australia.

221/14101 Regulatory focus moderates the impact of past behaviour on pro-environmental behavioural intention.

We investigate regulatory focus as a moderator of behavioural self-licensing versus consistency. In two studies we show that regulatory focus impacts the individual’s goals salience and determines whether one is more likely to show behavioural consistency or self-licensing.

Fanny Lalot

PhD Student. University of Geneva. Distance Learning University of Switzerland. Geneva. Switzerland.

Juan M Falomir Pichastor

Professor. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.

Alain Quiamzade

Senior Lecturer. University of Geneva. Distance Learning University of Switzerland. Geneva. Switzerland.

221/14104 Reducing stereotype threat with embodied triggers of prevention focus

Based on the regulatory fit hypothesis, four experiments showed that cognitive performance increased under stereotype threat when a prevention focus was induced, by contracting the left hand or by presenting math stimuli on the left side of the visual field.

Aina Chalabaev

Assistant Professor. Grenoble Alpes University. Grenoble. France.

Rémi Radel

Assistant Professor. University of Nice Sophia Antipolis. Nice. France.

E. J. Masicampo

Assistant Professor. Wake Forest University. Winston-Salem NC. USA.

Vincent Dru

Professor. University of Paris Nanterre. Paris. France.

221/14105 A Regulatory Focus Perspective on Performance Goals’ Effects on Achievement: A Small-Scale Meta-analysis Approach

Performance-approach and -avoidance goals exert respectively positive and negative effects on achievement. We perform a small-scale meta-analysis on five studies and suggest that these effects depend on individuals’ by-default orientation towards promotion focus, and tend to reverse under prevention focus.

Wojciech Swiatkowski

PhD Student. Department of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland.

Benoît Dompnier

Senior Lecturer. Department of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland.

Group Processes

221/1017 What makes people motivate to succeed group norm to the next generation? : Development of group-norm succession motivation scale.

Current study aimed at developing a new scale to assess each individual’s motivation to group norm succession. Result showed that group-norm succession motivation was consisted of following four factors, “Responsibility”, “Duty of succession”, “Preservation of group image“, and “Fiat”.

Miki Ozeki

Lecturer, Department of Human and Welfare, Tokyo International Unicresity, Japan

221/1040 Predictors of pro in-group action tendencies among football supporters

A study of 568 football supporters examined predictors of collective action (CA). Negative perception of out-groups (i.e. the police), and relational ties to in-group independently predicted CA. Moreover self-expansion and group efficacy mediated the relationship between identity fusion and CA.

Tomasz Besta

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.

Radosław Kossakowski

Sociologist, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.

221/1041 Developing a measure of men’s support for gender equality: The distinction between public and private support

We developed, replicated, and validated the 20-item Support for Gender Equality among Men Scale assessing to which extent (a) men hold positive attitudes towards gender equality and (b) advance the cause of gender equality through actions in their everyday life.

Antonia Sudkaemper

PhD Candidate in Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

Michelle K Ryan

Professor, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

Teri Kirby

Lecturer, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

Thekla Morgenroth

Research Fellow, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

221/1057 Combined Effects of Network Centrality and Group Identification on Daily Stress

We aimed at integrating the social identity approach with social network analysis. Results revealed that more central group members were more likely to suffer from stress as long as they were not highly identified with their group.

Andreas Mojzisch

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Hildesheim, Hildesheim, Germany

Johanna Frisch

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Hildesheim, Hildesheim, Germany

Malte Doehne

Sociologist, Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany

Maren Reder

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Hildesheim, Hildesheim, Germany

Jan Häusser

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Gießen, Germany

221/1066 Effects of Identity-uncertainty and Social Self-discrepancy on Support of Protests: Evidence from Hong Kong

This study explored the relationship among identity-uncertainty, social self-discrepancy and support of the 2014 Hong Kong Protests. Results revealed identity-uncertainty and social self-discrepancy predicted protest support, controlling for gender, satisfaction with the government and identifications with Hong Kong and China.

Xiang Ao

Doctoral Student in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. Division of Behavioral and Organizational Science. Claremont Graduate University. Claremont. California. USA

221/1069 Using social identity primes to encourage water conservation behaviour: Evidence from the lab and field

A social identity approach was employed to encourage water conservation behaviour. Three studies demonstrated that social identity appeals (e.g. ‘Norwich conserves water’) increased group members’ behavioural intentions above information-only and control conditions. Effects were moderated by group identification.

Rose Meleady

University of East Anglia

Ellin Lede

Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia

Charles Seger

School of Psychology, University of East Anglia

Charlie Wilson

Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia

221/1080 Transformational leadership and group potency in small military units: The mediating role of group identification and cohesion

The study analyzes the relationship between transformational leadership and group potency and the mediating role of group identification and cohesion with squads of the Spanish Army. The research aid to understand the success of missions of security and defense organizations.

Carlos García-Guiu López

Psychologist. PhD. Universidad de Granada. Granada. Spain.

Carlos García-Guiu López

Psychologist. PhD. Universidad de Granada. Granada. Spain.

Miguel Moya Morales

Psychologist. Professor. Universidad de Granada. Granada. Spain.

Fernando Molero

Psychologist. Professor. Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia. Madrid. Spain.

221/1108 Keeping up appearances: Strategic information exchange by disidentified group members.

Disidentified group members strategically act against the interest of the group in information exchange by withholding important private information, and in doing so they put on a convincing charade to keep the other group members from finding out.

Jort de Vreeze

Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Tuebingen, Germany

221/1129 Selecting and weighting diversity attributes for faultline determination

Which characteristics of team-members should be selected for determining diversity faultlines? A new algorithm reveals the relative importance of multiple attributes for a given team-outcome. Validity is demonstrated by three empirical studies.

Andreas Glenz

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

221/1137 Gender and parenting: Stereotypical beliefs about the better parent can influence child custody decisions

Gender stereotypes can lead to biased decisions in child custody cases. In a 2x2 scenario-experiment we found that competently depicted parents were assigned greater child custody than incompetent ones, mothers were also assigned greater child custody than fathers.

Jörn Meyer

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. FernUniversität Hagen. Hagen. Germany

Anne-Kathrin Meyer

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. FernUniversität Hagen. Hagen. Germany

Toni Alexander Ihme

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. FernUniversität Hagen. Hagen. Germany

Stefan Stürmer

Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology. FernUniversität Hagen. Hagen. Germany

221/1155 Identity-based threat associated with support as a barrier to intragroup support seeking

Three studies investigated the impact of perceptions of support as threatening to group identity on intragroup support seeking. Perceptions of support threat reduced willingness to seek support while group identification increased it. Support-seeking norms reduced threat and increased support-seeking behaviour.

Tamara Butler

Researcher. School of Psychology. The University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Blake McKimmie

Associate Professor. School of Psychology. The University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

S. Alexander Haslam

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/1163 National Identity, Uncertainty Produced by the Media, and Attitude Polarization: A Greek Context

Drawing on uncertainty-identity theory, we explore the extent to which media messages produce uncertainty regarding national identity and subsequent polarization of ingroup attitudes within the Greek crisis. Results indicate while uncertainty shapes attitudes toward policies, type of media exposure mediates this relationship.

Antonis Gardikiotis

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Sucharita Belavadi

Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA, USA

Michael A. Hogg

Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA, USA

221/1168 The eternal feminine. Gender stereotypes and sexualization in Italian television advertisements

The analysis of 287 Italian television ads shows that women are portrayed as younger, as more sensual and as more engaged in care-related activities in the home environment than men. Men are portrayed as more independent and competent than women.

Alessandra Sacino

PhD student. Department of Science Education. University of Genova. Genova. Italy

Roberta Rosa Valtorta

PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Milano-Bicocca. Milano. Italy.

Cristina Baldissarri

PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Milano-Bicocca. Milano. Italy

221/1180 Loyalty, fairness and authority: Cross-cultural assessment of authority decision acceptance at intergroup level

A cross-cultural study comparing Malaysian and the UK sample investigated how groups respond to intergroup-level authority decisions. Moral values and the associated cultural context altered the way group members responded to authority decisions.

Karolina Urbanska

PhD student. School of Psychology. Queen's University Belfast

Samuel Pehrson

Lecturer. School of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of Saint Andrews.

Miriam Park

Senior Lecturer. Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Monash University Malaysia.

Rhiannon Turner

Professor. School of Psychology. Queen's University Belfast.

221/1185 Structural power, sense of power and Ethnocultural empathy

This work explores the influence of structural power on empathy and the moderator role of sense of power: soft or hard. Differences on empathy were found only for participants with structural power depending on their level of hard power.

Antonio Bustillos

Psychologist. Professor. UNED. Madrid. Spain

Daniel Buraschi

Psychologist. Immigration Observatory of Tenerife. ULL. Tenerife. Spain

Carmen Huici Casal

Psychologist. Professor. UNED. Madrid. Spain.

221/1186 What processes could improve the acceptation of transactional justice in Colombia? Empathy or collective guilt.

This work explores the influence of empathic and collective guilt inductions on the acceptance of transitional justice. The two studies developed showed that collective guilt experience, and not empathic induction, was responsible of a greater acceptance of transactional justice and the reconciliation process in Colombian society.

Yuli Andrea Botero

Psychologist. Professor. Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. Palmira. Colombia

Antonio Bustillos

Psychologist. Professor. UNED. Madrid. Spain

Alicia Gil

Lawyer. Professor. UNED. Madrid. Spain

221/1231 Being stereotypically perceived as the better parent: Effects on postdivorce child custody assignments

Women are stereotypically believed to be the better parent. In a repeated measures experimental design law students attributed more nurturing and caring behavior to a feminine-described parent regardless of the actual gender. Overall, mothers received more custodial care than fathers.

Anne-Kathrin Meyer

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Fernuniversität Hagen. Hagen. Germany

Jörn Meyer

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Fernuniversität Hagen. Hagen. Germany

Stefan Stürmer

Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology. Fernuniversität Hagen. Hagen. Germany

221/1264 Grey areas of leader’s ethicality: attributions of behavior depend on the impact to the group

The present experiment showed that ethical and unethical leaders have their behavior attributed to internal or external dispositions based on the impact (beneficial, harmful, or neutral) that such behavior has to the group.

Catarina Morais

School of Psychology, University of Kent. Canterbury, United Kingdom

Georgina Randsley de Moura

School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom.

Dominic Abrams

School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom.

Ana Leite

Department of Psychology. University of Roehampton. London. United Kingdom

221/1276 “A right to lead”: perceived (il)legitimacy as a pivotal factor when dealing with transgressive leadership

Our research tests the role of a leader’s perceived legitimacy on reactions by group members to ingroup leaders who transgress moral norms, along with role played by the intentions behind their transgressive behaviour and the existence of social control mechanisms.

André Marques

PhD Student. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom.

Isabel Pinto

Lecturer. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Porto. Porto. Portugal

Ana Leite

Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Roehampton. London. United Kingdom.

Georgina Randsley de Moura

Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom.

Jan-Willem van Prooijen

Lecturer. VU University Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands

Jose Marques

Lecturer. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Porto. Porto. Portugal

221/1307 Intergroup forgiveness and peacemaking processes: citizens’ well-being and the Italian Years of Lead open wounds

The study focuses on intergroup forgiveness and its peacemaking strategy to overcome the Italian Years of Lead terrorist open wounds. Data show that intergroup forgiveness mediated the link between citizens’ social wounds and their social well-being.

Silvia Donato

Researcher of Social Psychology. Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan. Italy

Sara Pelucchi

Psycholgist. Research Fellow. Department of Psychology. Catholic University of Milan. Milan. Italy

Giorgia Paleari

Associate Professor. Department of Human and Social Sciences. University of Bergamo. Bergamo. Italy.

Camillo Regalia

Full Professor. Department of Psychology. Catholic University of Milan. Milan. Italy

221/5701 When does ingroup favoritism enhance self-esteem? A normative perspective

This research examines the self-esteem hypothesis (Abrams & Hogg, 1988) through a normative perspective. Two experimental studies show that ingroup favoritism enhances self-esteem only when the ingroup norm is pro-discriminatory. When the ingroup norm is anti-discriminatory, ingroup favoritism decreases self-esteem.

Vincenzo Iacoviello

Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Jacques Berent

Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Social Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Natasha Frederic

PhD student, Department of Social Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Andrea Pereira

Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology, New York University, USA

221/5703 How normative incongruence with higher education achievement culture impacts women’s academic path

Higher education institutions create a specific achievement culture based on self-enhancement values. In two studies we demonstrated that women may experience a normative incongruence within this culture, with deleterious consequences on their academic functioning.

Cristina Aelenei

Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Social Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Delphine Martinot

Professor of Social Psychology, Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive,University Clermont Auvergne, France

Céline Darnon

Assistant Professor of Social Psychology, Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive,University Clermont Auvergne, France

221/9502 The Good Sheep: The Cost of Sustaining the Norms in the Face of Deviance

We use two experiments to investigate group members’ likelihood to compensate for others’ deviations, in spite of personal losses. Results indicate that high-identifiers’ contribution is higher when the norm is central, and deviants’ intentions to harm unambiguous. Implications are discussed.

Marika Rullo

Newton Fellow. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom

Giovanni A. Travaglino

Lecturer. School of Psychology. Center for the Study of Group Processes. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom

Fabio Presaghi

Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Rome, Sapienza. Rome. Italy

Stefano Livi

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Rome, Sapienza. Rome. Italy

Dominic Abrams

Professor. School of Psychology. Center for the Study of Group Processes. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom

221/9503 When friends turn foes – How deviant behavior motivates exclusion and leaving

We propose that group members readily exclude others whose behavior they perceive to subvert their group’s identity, but only leave their group when the deviate’s behavior affects their relation to the group. Three experiments support this hypothesis.

Lara Ditrich

Researcher. Social Processes Lab. IWM Tübingen. Tübingen. Germany

Kai Sassenberg

Professor. Social Processes Lab. IWM Tübingen. Tübingen. Germany

Interpersonal Relations

221/1013 The relationship between subjective socioeconomic status and aggression

Compared with a medium socioeconomic status (SES) condition, participants of low SES were more aggressive, whereas participants of high SES were not less aggressive. Low SES increased aggression toward targets that were the source for participants’ experience of disadvantage but also toward neutral targets.

Tobias Greitemeyer

Psychologist. Professor. University of Innsbruck

221/1028 The influence of first name valence on the likelihood of receiving help: A field experiment

In a field experiment applying the lost e-mail technique (N = 631), it was found that people with socially devalued first name receive less help getting into a high-status job compared to people bearing positively valued names.

Johannes Lutz

University of Potsdam

Robert Busching

University of Potsdam

221/1035 Office of Love and Support: The Significance of Workplace Relationships

In two studies, we tested whether the association between a secure relationship with either a supervisor or colleague and positive individual/organisational outcomes is due to the positive emotions these relationships evoke. The findings across both studies supported our hypotheses.

Michelle Luke

Psychologist, Associate Professor, School of Business, Management and Economics, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

Constantine Sedikides

Psychologist, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

Constantine Sedikides

Psychologist, Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

221/1043 Cultural Antecedents of Feeling Lonely: Individualism, Collectivism, and Loneliness in Austria

We examined cultural risk factors for loneliness in Austria, distinguishing internalized collectivism and collectivism as perceived in one’s environment. Whereas internalized collectivism proved to act as a buffer against loneliness, merely perceiving collectivism appeared to be a risk factor.

Luzia Heu

Psychologist. PhD student in Social Psychology. Heymans Institute for Psychological Research. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

Martijn van Zomeren

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Heymans Institute for Psychological Research. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

Nina Hansen

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Heymans Institute for Psychological Research. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

221/1047 The (Reversed) Red Effect and the Misattribution of Arousal

The aim of this three-factorial experiment was to show that the misattribution of arousal is the specific mechanism underlying the red effect. In addition to the usual red effect, a reversed red effect could be observed.

Heike Andrea Schünemann

Psychologist. Bergische Universität Wuppertal. Wuppertal. Germany

Manfred Hassebrauck

Psychologist. Professor. Bergische Universität Wuppertal. Wuppertal. Germany.

221/1054 Avoidance in connection with interpersonal problems among adolescents in a Hungarian context

We investigated social problem-solving and avoidance among 12–16-year-olds. Between the age of 12–16 there is no alternation in positive orientation, while impulsivity shows progressive increase, and rationality, avoidance and negative orientation grow significantly from the age of 14.

László Kasik

Researcher. University of Szeged Institute of Education, Hungary

Zita Gál

Researcher. University of Szeged Institute of Psychology, Szeged

221/1061 Social exclusion boosts the negative effects of violent video games exposure on aggression

Two experiments tested the possible multiplicative effect of social exclusion and exposure to violent video games on adolescents’ aggressiveness. Results showed that exclusion significantly increased the negative effects of violent video games exposure on aggression.

Alessandro Gabbiadini

Post-doc research fellow, Department of Psychology, University of Milano Bicocca

Paolo Riva

Post-doc research fellow, Department of Psychology, University of Milano Bicocca

221/1074 When and by what means we can infer others’ attitudes?

This study showed that the children’s perceptions of their parents’ attitudes towards their spouses positively correlated with the children’s own attitudes towards their parents, and the correlation was stronger if their parents expressed positive emotions towards their spouses less frequently.

Mizuka Ohtaka

Social Psychologist. Department of Politics and Public Administration. Faculty of Law. Yamanashi Gakuin University. Kofu. Japan

221/1104 The role and motives of narcissism in workplace bullying

An online study with 290 American employees revealed that narcissism was correlated with multiple facets of workplace bullying. Furthermore, both chronic motivations (high power, low empathy) and defensive reactions (high impulsivity, threatened self-esteem) play mediating roles in narcissists’ workplace bullying.

Claire Hart

Lecturer, Centre for Research on Self and Identity, Psychology Department, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.

Erica Hepper

Lecturer, Psychology Department, University of Surrey, Guilford, Surrey, UK

221/1111 Cultural orientations of Vietnamese Czechs with different generational status

The aim of the study was to compare domains of Czech and Vietnamese cultural orientations measured with General Ethnicity Questionnaire in three samples differing in generational status. Significant differences on the dimensions of Czech and Vietnamese cultural orientations were found across generations.

Martina Hrebickova

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, The Czech Republic

221/1119 Revisiting the link between sociosexuality and relationship quality: The role of (non)monogamy

Unrestricted sociosexuality was associated with more extradyadic sex in monogamous individuals, but only when less romantically committed (Study 1). Non-monogamous (vs. monogamous) individuals were more sociosexually unrestricted, but showed no differences in relationship quality.

David Rodrigues

Post-Doc. ISCTE-IUL, CIS-IUL; Goldsmiths. Lisboa. Portugal

Diniz Lopes

Professor. ISCTE-IUL, CIS-IUL. Lisboa. Portugal

C. Veronica Smith

Professor. University of Mississippi. Mississippi. USA

221/1161 Intergenerational involvements from parents and parents-in-law: their effects on marital satisfaction in Taiwan

Results of the study indicated that Chinese married women received more help from parents than from parents-in-law. They also provided more help to parents. Moreover, support and interference from parents-in-law exerted strong influences on women’s marital satisfaction.

Tsui-Shan Li

Professor, Department of Child and Family Studies, Fu-Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan.

221/1234 INFLUENCE OF MASS MEDIA AND IDEOLOGY ON THE ATTRIBUTTION OF CULPABILITY OF GENDER VIOLENCE

The goal was to investigate the treatment that gender violence receives in mass media. The information presented about woman was manipulated. Results showed that social perception is related with the treatment that gender violence receives in mass media and sexist ideology.

M. Carmen Herrera Enríquez

Psichologist. Assistant Professor. Dpto. Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada, Spain.

María Sánchez-Castelló

Psychologist. PhD student, Dpto. Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada, Spain

Marta Villalba-Torres

Psychologist. PhD student, Dpto. Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada, Spain

221/1235 Are we all Heroes? Increased Helping Intentions in high-cost Helping situations.

Three studies examined whether helping behavior can be better predicted by responsibility attributions, situational characteristics or kinship. In more dangerous scenarios, people’s willingness to intervene increases with the perceived dangerousness (driven by accepted costs), regardless of responsibility attributions or kinship.

David Urschler

Psychologist. PostDoc. University of Jena. Jena. Germany.

Hanna Heinrich

Psychologist. PhD-Student. University of Regensburg. Regensburg. Germany.

Peter Fischer

Psychologist. Professor. University of Regensburg. Regensburg. Germany.

221/1237 Context effect on street harassment: the role of the place and the perpetrator’

The aim was to search for the influence of contextual factors on street harassment. The main results showed that sexism is one of the variables best related to the perception of harassment, especially in lonely places and when the harassment is committed by a group.

Andrés Riquelme Riquelme

Psychologist. PhD student, Dpto. Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada, Spain

M. Carmen Herrera Enríquez

Psychologist, Assistant Professor. Dpto. Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada, Spain

Francisca Expósito Jiménez

Psychologist, Professor. Dpto. Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada, Spain

221/1248 Self-Objectification and Women’s Attribution of Blame, Sympathy, and Support for a Rape Victim

This study examined ways that women react to other women who are survivors of rape, as other women are often the first turned to when victims disclose their experience. We manipulated participant self-objectification in relationship to sympathy/support and victim blame.

Casey Bevens

PhD student, University of Edinburgh, School of Philosophy, Psychology, and Language Sciences, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

221/1250 Let’s talk about diversity: How are attitudes towards diversity dispersed within an organisational network?

A social network analysis investigated an organisation’s gender diversity ‘climate’, measured as similarity in network members’ gender diversity attitudes. Analysis revealed a distinct gender diversity network structure, and identified employee characteristics that foster a positive gender diversity climate.

Josephine Cooper

Psychology PhD student. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. England.

Manuela Barreto

Psychologist. Professor. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. England.

Safi Darden

Animal behaviourist/Psychologist. Lecturer. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. England.

221/1252 “Being nice is part of your job”: Influence of Victim´s response and Employment stability in perception of harassment by customers

The aim was to investigate the influence of variables in perception of harassment by customers. Main findings suggest that when the victim confronts the harasser and has a stable contract, participants believe that the victim will have fewer negative consequences.

Antonio Herrera Enríquez

Psychologist, Faculty of Psychology, Department of Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada (Spain)

M. Carmen Herrera Enríquez

Psychologist. Faculty of Psychology. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Granada (Spain)

Inés Torres Ferrón

Psychologist. Faculty of Psychology. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Granada (Spain)

Self and Identity

221/1018 Differences between forecasted and retrospective construction of the extended self through purchasing and well-being evaluations.

Using the framework of identity related functions from Dittmar (2010) linked to identity motivation research (Vignoles, 2010), the present study investigate the relationship between buying motives and well-being and the differences between future and past temporal focus on the construction of the extended self.

Olaya Moldes

School of Psychology

Olaya Moldes

PhD Student. School of Psychology, University of Sussex

Helga Dittmar

Reader in Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Sussex

Peter Harris

Professor of Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Sussex

Robin Banerjee

Professor of Developmental Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Sussex

Matthew Easterbrook

Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Sussex

221/1026 The Nadir of British Life: Social Representations of Unemployed Benefit Claimants

The study applies Social Representations Theory to unemployment in the UK. The results reveal the core of social representations of unemployed people are stigmatising and anchor the unemployed in poverty, criminality and laziness. Suggestions for research and theory integration are offered.

Celestin Okoroji

PhD Candidate, Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, London School of Economics, London, England

221/1044 How might culture shape our moral identity? A Cross-Cultural Investigation in Britain and Saudi Arabia

This poster presents two studies that investigates the intertwining of moral identity with cultural contexts. The results indicated that culture influenced moral identity. This research provides valuable information regarding the moral identity from cross-cultural perspective.

Mona ALSheddi

PhD resarcher. Psychology department.Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences.University of Surrey.Guildford.United Kingdom

Sophie Russell

Psychology department.Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences.University of Surrey.Guildford.United Kingdom

Peter Hegarty

Psychology department.Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences.University of Surrey.Guildford.United Kingdom

221/1048 Development of the online self-presentation strategies scale (OSPSS) from Saudi Arabian and British samples

This poster describes the development and validation of the online self-presentation strategies scale (OSPSS), based on questionnaire responses of 694 participants. Random intercept factor analysis provided six sub-scales, which were validated in two cultures: Saudi Arabia and the United Kingdom.

Heyla Selim

Psychologist, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK

Vivian Vignoles

Reader in Social Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Sussex, Falmer, UK.

Karen Long

Lecturer in Social Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Sussex, Falmer, UK

221/1063 Dual female-feminist identification buffers the effect of stereotypes on women’s leadership aspirations

It has been shown that identification with women and feminism differentially affects reactions to gender stereotypes. Ur research extends these findings and shows that dual female-feminist identifiers increased their leadership aspirations after exposure to gender stereotypes.

Carola Leicht

University of Kent, School of Psychology

Malgorzata Goclowska

University of Amsterdam, Department of Work and Organizational Psychology

Jolien van Breen

Department of Psychology, University of Groningen

Soledad de Lemus Martín

University of Grenada, Department of Psychology

Georgina Randsley de Moura

University of Kent, School of Psychology

221/1076 Meaning in life: proximal sources, distal sources and meaning systems

Using a new measure, a large online study shows that coherence might have a subtler role in the experience of meaning than initially thought. We also present evidence for the potential unique contribution of sense of control to meaningfulness.

Vlad Costin

Brighton

Vlad Costin

Psychologist. PhD student. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. United Kingdom

221/1145 Altruistic Behavior and Subjective Well-Being: A Meta-Analytic Perspective

This meta-analysis examined whether altruism leads to heightened subjective well-being. Altruism was significantly positively correlated with positive affect and life satisfaction. Moreover, altruism was causally related to positive affect. These relationships were not moderated by the magnitude of altruists’ sacrifices.

Kassidy Velasquez

Graduate Student. Department of Psychology. Florida State University. Tallahassee. United States.

221/1151 An autobiographical gateway: Self-esteem, narcissism and visual perspective while retrieving self-threatening memories

This research examines the retrieval of self-threatening autobiographical memories among individuals with narcissistic versus genuine self-esteem. Narcissism predicted avoiding first-person perspective and employing third-person perspective in self-threatening memories, while self-esteem predicted first-person perspective for self-relevant (event if threatening) memories.

Marta Marchlewska

PhD, Institute for Social Studies, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

Aleksandra Cichocka

Lecturer, School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom

221/1164 “But I don’t want to”: The role of task aversiveness in self-control's effects on behavior

It is typically implied that people with high self-control perform better on long-term goals because of their ability to inhibit impulses. We offer an alternative mechanism, showing that high self-control is related to lower aversion toward goal-directed behavior.

Floor Kroese

Assistant professor. Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Marleen Gillebaart

Assistant professor. Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/1174 The Strength of Measuring Identity Content: An Integrative Approach to the Conceptualization and Measurement of Identity Content

Theoretically, identity strength and content jointly determine an identity’s influence, but empirically, content is underutilized. I introduce a new, integrative approach to identity content that outlines what identity content is, and how to measure it quantitatively and apply it.

Felicity Turner-Zwinkels

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Martijn van Zomeren

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Tom Postmes

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

221/1194 The Role of Transgenerational Identity Transmission in the Development of National Identity of Hungarian Children

In-depth interviews were completed with 30 Hungarian families living in the UK. Participating parents were asked to tell their children a positive and a negative story about being Hungarian. Results suggested that language usage and attachment objects are more important for the migrant group.

Gabriella Judith Kengyel

RESEARCH ASSISTANT, SOCIALPSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT, INSTITUTE OF PSYCHOLOGY, PÁZMÁNY PÉTER CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

221/1220 The Integrative Model of Collective Pride

The Integrative Model of Collective Pride proposes that there are two facets of collective pride: authentic collective pride and hubristic collective pride. The psychological and contextual antecedents and consequences of these two facets of collective pride are described.

Cynthia Pickett

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA USA

221/1226 Autobiographical Characters Within Life Stories About the Chilean Dictatorship: Memories and Claims About the Self

This poster reports the results of a qualitative study that aimed to understand how people present themselves when remembering autobiographically the Chilean dictatorship. Attempts to legitimate personal choices related to that past are identified, as an attempt to protect self-concept.

Carolina Rocha Santa María

Psychologist. Researcher. Social Psychology Laboratory. Psychology Department. Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. Santiago. Chile

Marcela Cornejo

Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. Santiago. Chile

Nicolás Villarroel

Psychologist. Assistan Professor. Psychology Department. Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. Santiago. Chile

Enzo Cáceres

Psychologist. Psychology Department. Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. Santiago. Chile

Anastassia Vivanco

Psychologist. Research Assistant. Attachment and Emotional Regulation Centre. Psycology Department. Universidad del Desarrollo. Santiago, Chile.

221/1229 A qualitative study on rhetorical identity management strategies in the context of a contested illness

We analysed the kinds of identity strategies individuals suffering from a contested illness use when depicting their narratives to a public audience. The respondents managed their identity by seeking recognition for their suffering and simultaneously underlining their superordinate category memberships.

Eerika Finell

Senior Lecturer, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland

Tuija Seppälä

Researcher, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland

221/1244 The role of identity in well-being and life engagement

Psychological well-being is in part dependent upon self-identity. The study aims to explore if four types of identity are predictors of subjective well-being in Asian context. Personal and relational identities contribute more to well-being compare to social and collective.

Elizaveta Berezina

Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology. TMC Academy. Singapore

Hew Gill

Psychologist. Professor. Head of Psychology. Sunway University. Malaysia

Inna Bovina

Psychologist. Professor. Moscow State University of Psychology and Education. Russia

221/1247 Preadolescents' Ethnic Identification placed in Context: The Role of Classroom Norms and Ethnic Class Composition

A multi-level study revealed that different aspects of preadolescents’ ethnic identification depend on different classroom characteristics. Multicultural education affected the ethnic self-esteem of minority group students positively, while positive peer group norms were related to students’ ethnic group introjection.

Nadya Gharaei

PhD Researcher. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

Jochem Thijs

Researcher. ERCOMER. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands

Maykel Verkuyten

Researcher. ERCOMER. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands

221/1251 Development and interrelations among three foci of identification: A longitudinal field study throughout a merger

We examined development and interrelations among organizational, work group, and professional identification by using longitudinal survey data from an organizational merger. The results emphasize the importance of managerial actions to enhance identification, especially in the early stages of organizational changes.

Janne Kaltiainen

Doctoral student. Department of Social Sciences. University of Helsinki. Helsinki. Finland.

Jukka Lipponen

Lecturer. Department of Social Sciences. University of Helsinki. Helsinki. Finland.

19.30 - 20.20 h. Moscovici Award session: Communal and agentic content. A dual perspective model.

Room: Manuel Falla

Speakers:

Andrea Abele Brehm

Social Psychologists. Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen. Nürnberg, Germany.

Bogdan Wojciszke

University of Social Sciences and Humanities. Warsaw, Poland.

20.30 - 21.30 h. Welcome reception

Room: Manuel Falla

Thursday 6 July

9.00 - 10.40 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions V

221/126 - The psychology of inequality: How inequality influences perceptions, motives, and behaviours

Room: Manuel Falla

"This symposium discusses the importance of examining the psychological implications of inequality. We present correlational and experimental findings examining the influence of social inequality and relative wealth on perceptions, motives and behaviours. "

Chair:

Almudena Claassen

Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium.

221/12601 Economic inequality makes us infer more individualism around us

We predicted that economic inequality affects the way people relate to others, specifically the social norms that prevail in society. Three experiments supported this hypothesis showing that high (vs. low) economic inequality led participants to infer more individualistic social norms.

Ángel Sánchez-Rodríguez

University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

Guillermo Willis

University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

Guillermo B. Willis

University of Granada, Granada, Spain.

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón

University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

221/12602 Perceived socio-economic position influences micro-social distributions of wealth

Inequality is linked to micro-economic transactions. In an Ultimatum Game wealthy proposers acted to maintain inequality by dividing money fairly with a wealthy responder, but offering less to a poor responder. However, poor responders rejected unfair offers, thus challenging inequality.

Boyka Bratanova

University of St. Andrews. St. Andrews. United Kingdom.

Steve Loughnan

University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. United Kingdom.

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

Robert Wood

The University of Melbourne. Melbourne. Australia.

221/12603 Class anxiety: The more you have, the more you want?

Social class influences people’s goals, values, and perceptions. The present research systematically examined the attitudes towards status and wealth of both lower- and upper-class individuals, and revealed that the latter had stronger desire for both status and wealth.

Zhechen Wang

University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

Niklas Steffens

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/12604 Perceived poverty increases reward impulsivity

Inequality is related to worse health and lower wellbeing. In two studies, perceived relative poverty predicted impulsivity towards food and monetary rewards. People with low income were more impulsive because they experienced lower levels of perceived control.

Almudena Claassen

Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

Olivier Corneille

Université Catholique de Louvain. Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium.

221/12605 Future me wants me to be healthy: Thinking about the future reduces snack food intake

Does thinking about oneself in the future (compared to the present) lead to healthier eating behaviours? Participants ate less chocolate in the future condition when they had high BMI, low dietary restraint, or if they were generally more present-oriented.

Betty Chang

Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium.

Almudena Claassen

Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

Axel Cleeremans

Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium.

221/121 - Values as the Lens through Which We Perceive and Understand the World

Room: Machuca

The four presentations in this symposium investigate the relationships between values and perception, as a pathway through which values affect action. Together, they study how values impact attention and interpretation, perception biases, perception of moral accountability and information processing.

Chair:

Sharon Arieli

Researcher. Department of Management and Economics. The Open University. Raanana. Israel.

221/12101 How do values affect behavior? The mediating role of perception

In three studies we show that values impact attention to information and its interpretation, thus affecting behavior. People recalled information relevant to primed values and interpreted information according to their values. Interpretation of an ambiguous situation mediated the value-behavior relationship.

Lilach Sagiv

Researcher. The School of Business Administration. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Jerusalem. Israel

Sonia Roccas

Researcher. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

Ravit Nussinson

Researcher. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

Zohar Weinstein

Researcher. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

221/12102 Personal Values and Perception Biases

This research project points to multiple ways in which personal values affect perception biases. Six studies show the impact of values on perception biases (the self-serving bias, the halo effect and the primacy effect) and their implications.

Andrey Elster

Researcher. The School of Business Administration. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Jerusalem. Israel

Lilach Sagiv

Researcher. The School of Business Administration. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Jerusalem. Israel

221/12103 Personal values and moral accountability

Two studies (N = 52,196) explored the long-term motivations for holding people morally accountable for their behaviors. The findings revealed that Schwartz's values theory and its circumplex structure predicted individual differences in views and lay-beliefs regarding moral accountability.

Gilad Feldman

Researcher. Department of Work and Social Psychology. Maastricht University. Maastricht. Netherlands

221/12104 The Values Underlying the Way We Perceive and Interpret Information in Decision-Making

We investigated the values underlying individuals' preferences in decision-making. Taking a meta-analytic approach to integrate across 13 samples, we present distinct associations of personal values with deep epistemic thinking and with systematic style, distinguishing between these important and oft-confused constructs.

Sharon Arieli

Researcher. Department of Management and Economics. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

Adi Amit

Researcher. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

Niva Porzycki

Researcher. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

Sari Metser

Researcher. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel

221/12105 Discussant

Our distinguished discussant, will offer integrative comments on the four presentations and lead open discussion.

Carsten K.W. De Dreu

Researcher. Institute for Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. Netherlands

221/137 - Mechanisms of Interventions for Conflict Resolution

Room: Picasso

The symposium investigates mechanisms of interventions for conflict resolution. Three papers present research that develops psychological, science-based avenues to promote intergroup relations, and two papers focus upon translating such mechanisms into applicable interventions within contexts of intergroup conflict.

Chair:

Smadar Cohen-Chen

Surrey Business School. University of Surrey. Guildford. United Kingdom.

221/13701 Willing and able: Outgroup Change Perceptions induce conciliatory attitudes in intergroup conflict

Four studies, conducted within two intergroup contexts, demonstrated that instilling a perception that an outgroup is motivated to change induced conciliatory policy support through both increased hope for the future and positive intergroup attitudes.

Smadar Cohen-Chen

Surrey Business School, University of Surrey, UK

221/13702 Paradoxical thinking conflict resolution intervention: Comparison to alternative interventions and examination of psychological mechanisms

Two studies show that paradoxical thinking line of interventions, providing consistent – but extreme – information, were more effective with hawkish participants, compared to interventions that provide inconsistent information. The studies also provide evidence for the psychological mechanisms the underlie

Boaz Hameiri

Tel Aviv University; and Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, Israel

Eden Nabet

Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, Israel

Roni Porat

Hebrew University and Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, Israel

Daniel Bar-Tal

Tel Aviv University

Eran Halperin

Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, Israel

221/13703 Upregulating Post-Apology Engagement: Concern for the Victimized Group’s Future Vitality Promotes Continued Reconciliatory Effort

We explore why perpetrator groups disengage from their past after providing a collective apology, and how post-apology engagement can be upregulated. In two studies, we show that empathetic collective angst increases support for policies that empower the victimized group.

Michael Wohl

Carleton University, Canada

Samantha Hollingshead

Carleton University, Canada

Darcy Dupuis

Seneca College, Canada

Nassim Tabri

Carleton University, Canada

221/13704 The timing of collective apologies

Collective apologies offered with a time delay are perceived to be less sincere and lead to less forgiveness, unless, rather than a verbal statement, the apology takes a commemorative form, allowing the delay to be given a favourable meaning.

Michael Wenzel

Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia

Ellia Lawrence-Wood

University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

Tyler Okimoto

University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Matthew Hornsey

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/13705 Designing and implementing social psychological interventions in conflict settings.

This presentation will integrate the findings of six studies assessing the impact of a psychologically driven mass media intervention to reduce intergroup conflict in Central Africa. Implications will be drawn about designing and implementing psychological interventions in difficult contexts

Rezarta Bilali

New York University, New York, USA

221/163 - Good, bad or ugly? – A multifaceted perspective on narcissism and its outcomes

Room: Dinner 1

This symposium presents new perspectives and current directions in narcissism research from micro to macro levels. It brings together cutting-edge research on different concepts of narcissism and their relations to adaptive and maladaptive outcomes in the agentic and communal domain.

Chair:

Christiane Schoel

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Mannheim. Germany.

221/16301 Groups composed of a narcissistic group member and group members needing structure stimulate group creativity

Three individual and group studies show a group-level match between personal need for structure (PNS) and narcissism: group members seeking structure (high PNS) prefer to work with a highly narcissistic group member, and this match positively affects group-level creative performance.

Barbara Nevicka

Psychologist. Department of Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands

Femke S. Ten Velden

Psychologist. Department of Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands

Matthijs Baas

Psychologist. Department of Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands

221/16302 Shared endorsement of autocratic leadership – The case of narcissistic leaders and subordinates

Four (field and experimental) studies show (a) that both narcissistic leaders and narcissistic subordinates favor –diverging from pro-democratic default attitudes- a relatively autocratic leadership style and (b) that the similarity-attraction principle provides an explanation for these shared preferences.

Christiane Schoel

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany

Constantine Sedikides

Psychologist. Department of Social and Personality Psychology. University of Southampton. United Kingdom

Dagmar Stahlberg

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany

221/16303 The functional roles of pride and envy in narcissists’ quest for status

Four studies (N = 1,202) support that individuals characterized by narcissistic admiration/rivalry attain status as prestige/dominance by (a) displaying authentic/hubristic pride when they outperform others and by (b) reacting with benign/malicious envy when they are outperformed.

Jan Crusius

Assistant Professor of Social Psychology, Social Cognition Center Cologne, University of Cologne. Germany.

Jens Lange

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany

221/16304 Narcissism and prosociality: How narcissists perceive their prosociality, and what it actually looks like

We present two large studies on grandiose narcissism (agentic and communal) and prosociality (self-perceived and actual). Agentic narcissists perceived themselves as rather antisocial—and indeed they actually were. Conversely, communal narcissists perceived themselves as prosocial—but actually they were not.

Andreas Nehrlich

Psychologist. MZES Self and Society Research Group. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany

Jochen E. Gebauer

Psychologist. MZES Self and Society Research Group. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany

Constantine Sedikides

Psychologist. Department of Social and Personality Psychology. University of Southampton. United Kingdom

221/16305 Collective-communal narcissism: Its correlates and consequences

We propose a novel form of grandiose narcissism: "collective-communal narcissism." Collective-communal narcissists hold overly positive views of their ingroups in communal life-domains. Four studies describe collective-communal narcissism’s measurement, cross-cultural prevalence, well-being consequences, and importance for group behavior.

Magdalena Żemojtel-Piotrowska

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Gdansk. Gdansk. Poland

Jarosław Piotrowski

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. SWPS University. Poznań. Poland

Anna Czarna

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Kraków. Poland

Radosław Rogoza

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University. Warsaw. Poland

Tomasz Baran

Psychologist. Department of Personality Psychology. University of Warsaw. Warsaw. Poland

Jochen E. Gebauer

Psychologist. MZES Self and Society Research Group. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany

221/91 - Group creativity

Room: Dinner 2

Recent years have seen a sharp increase in research on group creativity. This symposium explores how group composition, group processes, and situational factors affect the creativity of groups.

Chair:

Bernard Nijstad

Professor of organizational behavior. Department of Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

221/9101 Cognitive Stimulation in Brainstorming: The (mis)fit between Psychological Needs and Diversity of Input

Cognitive stimulation is an important potential benefit of group interaction, but we know little about the boundary conditions for such stimulation to occur. We found that the diversity of stimulus ideas and participants’ psychological needs interactively predict cognitive stimulation effects.

Kiki de Jonge

PhD student. Department of Organizational Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Eric Rietzschel

Assistant Professor. Department of Organizational Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Nico Van Yperen

Professor. Department of Organizational Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

221/9102 The effect of group expertise heterogeneity on collaborative ideation and final group product

We examined the relationship between a collaborative ideation phase and a subsequent product development stage for groups varying in expertise. Mixed expertise led to more novel ideas, and the final product was influenced by the novelty of replies to ideas.

Jared Kenworthy

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Texas at Arlington. Arlington. USA

Lauren Coursey

Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Texas at Arlington. Arlington. USA

Ryan Gertner

PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Texas at Arlington. Arlington. USA

Belinda Williams

PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Texas at Arlington. Arlington. USA

Paul Paulus

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Texas at Arlington. Arlington. USA

221/9103 It Takes Two to Clap: Collectivistic Values and Independent Self Jointly Promote Group Creativity

We tested our hypothesis regarding the synergistic effects of collectivistic values and independent self-representation on group creativity in the laboratory. We found support for our hypothesis using various tasks. We discuss implications of our findings and directions for future research.

Hoon-Seok Choi

Professor. Department of Psychology. Sungkyunkwan University. Seoul. Republic of Korea

221/9104 Conflict, interdependence, and team creativity

Two field studies showed that task conflict stimulated creativity/innovation when both task and outcome interdependence were high, but undermined it when there was a mismatch between task and outcome interdependence.

Bernard Nijstad

Professor. Department of HRM/OB. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

221/203 - How Social Interactions Shape Remembering and Subsequent Memory

Room: Andalucía III

How do social interactions affect remembering during the interaction and what is subsequently remembered? We discuss how conversations and collaborative remembering influence emotional autobiographical memory, person memory, memory for ambiguous scientific issues, memory for own and others’ decisions, and forgetting.

Chair:

Echterhoff Gerald

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Münster. Münster. Germany.

221/20301 Collaborative Remembering of Emotional Autobiographical Memories

Shared reminiscence of emotional autobiographical events frequently occurs, but its consequences on the memory or emotional views of the event are poorly understood. I will discuss a large-scale experimental study where we recently examined this question.

Suparna Rajaram

Cognitive Science. Professor. Department of Psychology. Stony Brook University. USA.

Raeya Maswood

Cognitive Science. PhD student. Department of Psychology. Stony Brook University. USA

Anna Scharling Rasmussen

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences. Aarhus University. Denmark

221/20302 Distributing Person Memory: Groups as Memory Extensions of the Individual Mind

In person memory, both encoding and retrieval are often collaborative processes. Shared encoding reduced the collaborative-inhibition effect. Participants benefited from the elaborative processes of other group-members, suggesting that in impression-formation contexts, groups can function as cognitive extensions of isolated individuals.

Margarida Vaz Garrido

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL). Lisbon. Portugal.

Leonel Garcia-Marques

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Lisbon. Lisbon. Portugal.

221/20303 The Influence of Communication with Experts on Lay People’s Memory for Ambiguous Scientific Evidence

We investigated the audience-tuning memory bias in lay-expert communication about scientific issues, which often involve ambiguous evidence. The memory bias was greater after communication with an expert (vs. a lay) audience, indicating a dominance of epistemic motivation over relational motivation.

Gerald Echterhoff

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Münster. Münster. Germany.

Judith Knausenberger

Social Psychologist. Junior Researcher. Department of Psychology. University of Münster. Münster. Germany.

221/20304 We Distort Memories of Other’s Decisions, and Other’s Decisions Distort Memories of What We Decided

Two studies explore social psychological motivations and moderators of decision consolidation. Results show that for both own and other’s decisions, people distort memory to support the decision made. Also, feedback of other’s decisions may moderate consolidation of one’s own decision.

Torun Lindholm

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University. Stockholm. Sweden.

Amina Memon

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. Royal Holloway. University of London. London. Great Britain.

Ola Svenson

Psychologist. Professor Emeritus. Department of Psychology. Risk Analysis, Social and Decision Research Unit. Stockholm University. Stockholm. Sweden.

221/20305 Socially Shared Retrieval-Induced Forgetting: A Mechanism for Collective Memory Formation

Within a communication, selective remembering induces selective forgetting in all parties. Such socially shared retrieval-induced forgetting is more likely to occur in communications within a community rather than across communities, thereby underscoring its role in reinforcing established social relationships.

William Hirst

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. New School for Social Research. New York. USA

221/191 - Sleep and social psychology

Room: Andalucía II

Sleep loss has been shown to negatively affect several social abilities, such as emotionality, social perception, and communication. This symposium will go through the latest and most relevant findings in the area of sleep deprivation and social psychology.

Chair:

Tina Sundelin

Postdoc. Department of Clinical Neuroscience. Karolinska Institutet. Stockholm. Sweden.

221/19101 Sleep, emotion regulation and empathy

I will summarize results from our group showing that sleep loss imposes a negative bias to our impressions, lead to the selective persistence of negative emotional memories, and impairs the ability to share the emotional state of others.

Michelle Ferrara

Professor. Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences. University of L'Aquila. Coppito. Italy

221/19102 Emotion and face recognition in insomnia.

Insomnia, or chronic poor sleep, is associated with mood alterations and other daytime deficits. The current studies also indicate that poor sleep is related to a change in the perception of emotional intensity and impaired face recognition.

Louise Beattie

Visiting Researcher. School of Psychology. University of Glasgow. Glasgow. United Kingdom.

221/19103 Social perception of sleep deprivation: Effects of sleep loss on appearance

Following sleep loss, one is perceived as less attractive and healthy. Two new studies also indicate that sleep-deprived individuals are perceived as worse leaders and that others are less willing to spend time with them, solely based on their appearance.

John Axelsson

Associate Professor. Department of Clinical Neuroscience. Karolinska Institutet. Stockholm. Sweden.

221/19104 The effects of sleep loss on interpersonal interactions

Sleep deprivation has been found to affect social abilities such as leadership, moral awareness, and empathic accuracy. New experimental data indicate that sleep loss also affects more interpersonal functions, like helpfulness. However, some factors also seem resilient to sleep loss.

Tina Sundelin

Postdoc. Department of Clinical Neuroscience. Karolinska Institutet. Stockholm. Sweden.

221/192 - Studying intergroup relations ‘in the wild’: Research methods outside the lab

Room: Seminar

Most researchers rely heavily on laboratory experiments and (online) surveys. Here, we present and critically discuss a range of alternative methods for studying intergroup relations ‘in the wild’, such as archival methods, CCTV footage, lifelogging cameras and mobile apps.

Chair:

Miriam Koschate-Reis

Lecturer Organisational and Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

221/19201 Studying identity recognition and misrecognition at airports amongst military personnel, transgender, and gender non-conforming people

We investigated identity recognition / misrecognition at airports, where travelers experience surveillance and categorization. Recognition / misrecognition are central to airport experience, context-dependent, implicated in intra/inter-group relations (e.g. norms, outsiders & authorities), and result in avoidance, assimilation, or resistance strategies.

Meghan McNamara

Social psychologist. School of Psychology & Neuroscience. University of St. Andrews. St Andrews. UK

Stephen D. Reicher

Professor of Social Psychology. School of Psychology & Neuroscience. University of St. Andrews. St Andrews. UK

221/19202 The co-regulation of privacy with automated lifelogging cameras in public

Privacy theory suffers neglect by social psychologists. In this study we investigated how people manage theirs and others privacy while wearing automated cameras in public and private settings (N=26). Results include nuances around how people managed others need for privacy.

Avelie Stuart

Social psychologist. Department of Psycholoy. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK

Mark Levine

Professor of Social Psychology, University of Exeter. UK

221/19203 Aggression to violence: the role of intragroup/intergroup interactions in collective self-regulation and violence reduction

A CCTV microanalysis of intragroup/intergroup conflicts demonstrates that the actions of third-parties (particularly in-group members), rather than the aggressive dyad, are best predictive of violence. We emphasize the importance of the wider social context in understanding the transition of violence.

Richard Philpot

Social psychologist. Department of Psycholoy. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK

Mark Levine

Professor of Social Psychology, University of Exeter. UK

Miriam Koschate-Reis

Social psychologist. Department of Psycholoy. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK

Richard Everson

Professor of Machine Learning. Department of Computer Science. College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK

221/19204 Using technology to capture real-time intergenerational contact in everyday settings

We assessed intergroup contact between young and older people. Results showed attitudes and prejudice differed between contacts logged in real-time, using a mobile phone, compared to contacts reported retrospectively in a survey. We discuss practical implications of using mobile technology.

Tina Keil

Social psychologist. Department of Psycholoy. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK

Miriam Koschate-Reis

Social psychologist. Department of Psycholoy. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK

Mark Levine

Professor of Social Psychology, University of Exeter. UK

Zena Wood

Computer Scientist. Department of Computing and Information Systems. Faculty of Architecture, Computing and Humanities. University of Greenwich. London. UK

221/223 - Minds of a feather: Social network approaches to similarity in emotion, decision-making, and brainwaves.

Room: Andalucía I

Four studies using different, novel methodologies to capture psychological similarity in real-world dynamic social networks, show how people’s social networks shape, and are shaped by, interpersonal similarity in fundamental psychological processes such as emotion, decision-making, and brain-responses to everyday surroundings.

Chair:

Jozefien De Leersnyder

Social Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/22301 Emotional Acculturation of Immigrant Minority Youth in Cross-cultural Friendship Networks

The more immigrant minority adolescents (N=945) were nominated as ‘friends’ by Belgian majority classmates (N=1256), the higher their emotional similarity to majority peers, suggesting that processes of emotional acculturation are contingent upon minorities’ networks of actual and close majority friends.

Alba Jasini

Social Psychologist. PhD-student. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Jozefien De Leersnyder

Social Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Judit Kende

Social Psychologist. PhD-student. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Matteo Gagliolo

Sociologist. Post-doctoral researcher. Department of Sociology. Universite Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium

Karen Phalet

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Batja Mesquita

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/22302 Brains of a Feather: Similarity of Neural Responses to Naturalistic Stimuli Predicts Social Network Proximity

By combining neuroimaging with the characterization of participants’ real-world social network, we demonstrate that people respond to and interpret their surroundings more similarly to one another to the extent that they are close to each other in their social network.

Carolyn Parkinson

Social Neuroscientist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of California, Los Angeles. Los Angeles. USA. & Dartmouth College. Hanover. USA

Adam Kleinbaum

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Tuck School of Business. Dartmouth College. Hanover. USA

Thalia Wheatley

Social Neuroscientist. Associate Professor. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Dartmouth College. Hanover. USA

221/22303 Brain-to-Brain Synchrony During Real-World Group Interactions: A Classroom EEG Study

We simultaneously recorded the brainwaves of twelve high schoolers while they attended regular classes. Students’ brainwaves were more in sync with the group during class activities they liked better. Brain-to-brain synchrony was also stronger for students with higher social awareness.

Suzanne Dikker

Neurolinguist. Research Scientist. Institute of Linguistics. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands. & Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA

Lu Wan

Engineer. PhD-student. Department of Biomedical Engineering. University of Florida. Gainesville. USA

Ido Davidesco

Neurologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Neurology. School of Medicine. New York University. New York. USA.

Lisa Kaggen

Educational Scientist. M.A. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA.

Matthias Oostrik

Computer Artist. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

James McClintock

Biologist. Trevor Day school. New York. USA

Jess Rowland

Neuroscientist. Lab Manager. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA.

221/22304 Consensus, cohesion and cooperation

Social groups are confronted with collective problems that they have to solve under uncertainty. Group networks with higher algebraic connectivity enable its members to arrive at group decisions more quickly, to better resolve noise, and to contribute more to public

Jeroen Bruggeman

Sociologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Sociology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

9.00 - 10.40 h. Blitz: Presentations V

Session 9: Patterns of prejudice

Room: Albéniz

221/13901 Prejudice is political, not psychological

We offer a theoretical re-specification of the concept of prejudice by proposing that labelling specific attitudes as prejudiced reflects context-dependent understandings of social norms and ‘truths’ associated with representations of specific intergroup contexts.

Michael Platow

Professor, Research School of Psychology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

221/13902 ‘Intention’ as a non-performative diagnostic: understanding the social representations of discrimination

We present qualitative data in which minorities and majorities talked about discrimination (n= 54). We argue that ‘intention’ works to narrow discrimination into something so narrow as to exclude almost all experiences (including the most egregious acts of hate).

Katy Greenland

Senior Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

221/13903 “It was just a slip of the tongue”: Racial slips and gaffes in public settings

Informed by discursive psychology we analyse a corpus of racially offensive slips/gaffes made in public settings. The analysis demonstrates how such transgressions are treated as morally accountable and how speakers initiate repairs and apologies to deny a prejudiced identity.

Martha Augoustinos

Professor, School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

Rose Burford-Rice

Phd Candidate, School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

221/13904 History in the service of politics: constructing national identities during the Eurepean refugee 'crisis'

This study analysed accounts of history during five United Kingdom parliamentary debates on the European refugee ‘crisis’. The analysis demonstrated that politicians draw on notions of continuity, reciprocity, resonance and responsibility to mobilise social identities to support particular political projects.

Steve Kirkwood

Academic, School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

221/15601 Education: The last acceptable prejudice of the tolerant

Social psychology has neglected education-based groups. Education-based in-group bias is large and is expressed openly and explicitly. The less educated are evaluated more negatively than the poor or the working class, and they have largely internalised this negative evaluation.

Toon Kuppens

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Russell Spears

Social Psychologist. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Anthony S. R. Manstead

Social Psychologist. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. United Kingdom.

Bram Spruyt

Sociologist. Sociology Department. Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Bruxelles. Belgium.

Matthew J. Easterbrook

Social Psychologist. Psychology Department. University of Sussex. Sussex. United Kingdom.

221/15602 Anti-Roma prejudice as a unique form of intergroup bias and exclusion from the national ingroup

In four studies in Hungary and Slovakia, we showed that Anti-Roma prejudice is unique for its normative appropriateness, because intergroup contact increases rather than decreases prejudice, and cultural distancing of Roma people is a form of exclusion from national ingroups.

Márton Hadarics

Social Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

Anna Kende

Social Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Institute of Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

Barbara Lášticová

Social Psychologist. Institute for Research in Social Communication. Slovak Academy of Sciences. Bratislava. Slovakia.

221/15603 The power of positioning: Representations of white British Muslims in UK national newspapers

The paper explores the permeability of in-group/out-group positioning through the example of white Muslims in mainstream UK newspapers. It notes the contradicting ways in which white Muslims are positioned depending on the agenda of the media narrative.

Amena Amer

Social Psychologist. Institute of Social Psychology. London School of Economics. London. United Kingdom.

Caroline Howarth

Social Psychologist. Institute of Social Psychology. London School of Economics. London. United Kingdom.

Sandra Obradovic

Social Psychologist. Institute of Social Psychology. London School of Economics. London. United Kingdom.

221/1299 Conservationism, religion and prejudice: Is parasite stress the ultimate cause?

Parasite Stress Theory hypothesises that avoiding outgroups and adopting certain values/beliefs are advantageous when diseases are prevalent. We show that residents across the U.S. and the world exposed to higher disease rates predict conservatism, religious belief and prejudice towards outgroups.

Brian O'Shea

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

Corey Fincher

Assistant Psychologist. Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

Gordon Brown

Professor in Psychology. Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

Derrick Watson

Associate Psychologist. Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

221/1808 The influence of sexist language on social motivation at school and the workplace Does it matter? Influence of sexist language on motivation at school and at work

Gender-inclusive language enhances motivation to apply for a job and at school for both genders. The results are partly explained by reduced threat to women, increased self-esteem, and increased sense of belonging and identification. Implications for policy making are discussed.

Soledad de Lemus Martín

Assistant Professor. Social Psychology Department. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

Lucía Estevan-Reina

PhD candidate. Centro de Investigación Mente y Cerebro. Universidad de Granada

Anabel Sánchez-La Fuente

Student. Universidad de Granada

Marina Sánchez-López

Master student. Universidad de Málaga

221/1058 A test of the sociofunctional model of prejudice: when emotional mediation fails.

According to the sociofunctional model, outgroups evoke different perceived threats, arousing distinct emotions, which in turn, trigger various discriminatory behaviors. Two studies showed that threats predicted emotions and behaviors, but emotions did not mediate the threat-behavior links.

Benoite Aubé

Postdoctoral researcher. Institut de recherche en sciences psychologiques (IPSY). Université Catholique de Louvain. Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgique

François Ric

Professor. Faculté de Psychologie. Université de Bordeaux. Bordeaux. France

221/1649 National Points of View. Intergroup Bias in Wikipedia articles about intergroup conflicts.

We examined whether intergroup biases occur in Wikipedia despite its strict rules against biases by comparing articles of the two conflicting parties (e.g., the Russian and Ukrainian about the Russian-Ukrainian conflict) with automatic text analyses, content coding, and picture analyses.

Aileen Oeberst

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Mainz. Germany

Toni-Alexander Ihme

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Hagen. Germany

Christina Matschke

Psychologist. Knowledge Construction Lab. Leibniz Institute of Knowledge Media. Germany.

221/1711 The opposite effects of actual and self-perceived intelligence on racial prejudice

The present study, conducted in a Belgian community sample of 183 participants, finds evidence for the discrepancy between the relationship of actual intelligence and prejudice, and the relationship of self-perceived intelligence and prejudice.

Jonas De keersmaecker

PhD-student, Dept. of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent University, Belgium

Emma Onraet

Postdoctoral researcher. Dept. of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent University. Belgium

Noémie Lepouttre

Master student. Ghent University, Belgium

Arne Roets

Professor. Dept. of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent University. Belgium

221/1728 How we see people reflects prejudice: Reverse-correlated representations of mentally-handicapped persons from themselves vs. caregivers.

We collected implicit representations of the mentally handicapped persons (MHP) by caregivers and by MHP themselves through data-driven reverse correlation. Independent raters then judged representations from caregivers more negatively and less human-like than the ones from MHP.

Alice Follenfant

Assistant professor, Laboratoire de Psychologie EA4139, Univerty of Bordeaux, France

Juliane Degner

Professor, Department of Social Psychology, University of Hamburg, Germany

Session 10: Emotions and emotional states

Room: Machado

221/1482 The joy of suffering? The social costs and psychological dividends of enjoying pain

An emerging literature shows the benefits of painful experiences; yet there is little research on enjoying aversiveness. Across three studies, we demonstrate that people do indeed report enjoying painful experiences, and examine the psychosocial implications from partaker and observer perspectives.

Laura Ferris

School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

Brock Bastian

School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia

221/1366 Disgust as an essentialist emotion that signals nonviolent out-grouping with potentially low social costs

Disgust is an essentialist emotion. Expressing it signals nonviolent out-grouping due to the purity related immorality of the “disgusting” group. Individuals expressing disgust (vs. hate) are viewed more positively and are less blamed or accused of bigotry for their emotions.

Maayan Katzir

Social Cognition Center, Cologne University

Matan Hoffman

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Tel Aviv University

Nira Liberman

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Tel Aviv University

221/1817 ‘The smell of death: Frightening or merely disgusting?’

Previous research revealed that putrescine, a chemical compound associated with death, increases threat management (Wisman & Shrira, 2015). Three experiments will be presented in support of the hypothesis that exposure to putrescine elicits responses associated with sensory acquisition (fear).

Arnaud Wisman

Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. England

221/1839 An Existential Perspective on Regret

We examined regret’s existential function by relating it to search for meaning in life. This relationship was empirically confirmed in a series of correlational and experimental studies. Consistently, regret increased intentions to behave meaningful via search for meaning in life.

Eric Raymond Igou

Psychology, University of Limerick

Wijnand A. P. van Tilburg

King's College London

Elaine L. Kinsella

University of Limerick

221/1150 Understating the Role of the Perpetrator in Triggering Humiliation: The Effects of Hostility and Status

We found in the laboratory that hostility was a crucial variable to evoke humiliation, particularly when the perpetrator was a student; a high-status perpetrator (a professor) humiliated independently of the level of hostility he displayed against the victim.

Saulo Fernández

Assistant Profesor. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED. Madrid. Spain.

Eran Halperin

Professor. School of Psychology. Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Israel.

Rut Agudo

Undergraduate Student. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED. Madrid. Spain.

Tamar Saguy

Associate Professor. School of Psychology. Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Israel.

221/1172 The Psychology of Being Forgotten

Modern science possesses no explanatory framework with which to understand the experience of being forgotten. We provide evidence that memory signals the subjective importance attached to an object and that interpreting such signals has important consequences for interpersonal relationships.

Devin Ray

Univerisity of Aberdeen

Sarah Gomillion

University of Texas at Austin

Andrei Iulian Pintea

University of Aberdeen

221/1059 Lust for life: On the unspecific effects of deprivational states

The present research challenges the idea that deprivational attunements of the cognitive apparatus are motive-specific. We therefore predicted and found in two experiments that hunger can make hungry for sex and that social exclusion can trigger a lust for food.

Michael Haefner

Professor of Psychology, Berlin University of the Arts, Berlin, Germany

Johannes Fertmann

Researcher, Berlin University of the Arts, Berlin, Germany

Max Wohlers

MA Student, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

221/1576 Social Power and Affective Experiences

Three correlational and two experimental studies sampling both participants (n = 1060) and stimuli/contexts (neutral vs. negative vs. positive) indicate that having power increases, and lacking power reduces, both the desirability and variability of people's affective experiences.

Stefan Leach

University of Kent

Mario Weick

University of Kent

221/1222 Comparing boredom and depletion: A neurophysiological investigation

We examined neural sensitivity to rewards following depletion and boredom. Bored participants were more responsive to rewards than the neutral condition, and reported greater fatigue than depleted participants. Depleted participants were not more sensitive to rewards than the neutral condition.

Marina Milyavskaya

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

Michael Inzlicht

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Canada

Michael Larson

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Brigham Young Univeristy, Provo, Utah, USA.

221/1652 When ‘now’ is boring: Can mind-wandering boost our happiness during boring activities?

When bored, can we use the ability of our mind to travel through time and space to boost our happiness? Using lab studies and a smartphone study, we showed that positive mind-wandering is related to increased happiness during boring activities.

Maitta Spronken

Psychologist. PhD candidate. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. the Netherlands.

Rob Holland

Psychologist. Professor. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. the Netherlands.

Bernd Figner

Psychologist. Associate professor. Behavioural Science Institute and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. Radboud University. Nijmegen. the Netherlands.

Jonas Wachner

Psychologist. BSc. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. the Netherlands.

Ap Dijksterhuis

Psychologist. Professor. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. the Netherlands.

221/1257 Is there a ‘social cure’ for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder? Presenting a social psychological model of trauma

An online survey of participants with varying levels of traumatic symptoms. We propose a social psychological model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The model documents the relationship between interpersonal traumatic events, attachment, group identification, social acknowledgement, support and trauma symptoms.

Sarah Woodhouse

University of Sussex

221/1385 Methodological considerations in regard to dissonance affects measurement

Three studies explored the sensitivity of explicit and implicit affect scales to cognitive dissonance. Results showed that the sensitivity of a scale could be due -if not to the scale itself- to the timing of assessments in dissonance studies.

Alexis Akinyemi

Ph.D Student. Université Paris-Nanterre. Nanterre. France

Daniel Priolo

Associate Professor. Université Nice Sophia Antipolis. Nice. France

Cécile Sénémeaud

Professor. Université de Caen Basse-Normandie. Caen. France

David Vaidis

Associate Professor. Université Paris Descartes. Paris. France

Fabien Girandola

Professor. Aix-Marseille Universités. Aix-en-Provence. France

Patrick Gosling

Pofessor. Université Paris-Nanterre. Nanterre. France

221/1157 The influence of minimal and maximal goal framing on satisfaction after performance feedback

Goal-performance discrepancies influence satisfaction levels of individuals. While the value function of prospect theory has been suggested to be applicable in predicting the satisfaction function, the current research indicates that framing goals as minimal versus maximal changes the satisfaction function.

Steffen Giessner

Professor, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University

Daan Stam

Associate Professor, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University

Danny Verboom

Student, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University

Ibrahim Salama

Consultant, Simon-Kucher & Partners

Ravi Chugh

Consultant, Santiago GmbH & Co. KG

Lonneke Kleinbussink

Trainee, Achmea

10.40 - 11.10 h. Coffee Break

11.10 - 12.50 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions VI

221/53 - Engaged followership: Conceptual and empirical extensions

Room: Manuel Falla

This symposium presents conceptual and empirical developments of the notion of ‘engaged followership’ covering such diverse topics as leadership, obedience, radicalization, sporting performance and the behaviour of experimental participants. Overall it provides a general understanding of the psychology of authority.

Chair:

Stephen Reicher

Psychologist. School of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of St. Andrews. St. Andrews. United Kingdom.

221/5301 Emotional Engagement: The uses of humiliation in the mobilisation speeches of B.R. Ambedkar

This paper uses an analysis of Ambedkar’s speeches during two separate campaigns for Dalit dignity in order to show how emotion and categorisation work together in order to engage followers in different political projects

Yashpal Jogdand

Psychologist, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India

221/5302 Attending to both the Experimenter and the Learner in a VR replication of Milgram’s studies

In a Virtual Reality replication of Milgram’s studies, participants who identified with the ‘learner’ exhibited more helping behaviours while participants who identified with the study’s purpose reported lower levels of stress. This supports an ‘engaged followership’ model of obedience.

Megan Birney

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Chester at University Centre Shrewsbury, Shrewsbury, UK

221/5303 ISIS and the cycle of violence: An engaged followership analysis of radicalisation

An analysis of the IS magazine Dabiq shows how the group creates a ‘cycle of violence’: terror is used to promote the social exclusion of Muslims in the West and exclusion is used to promote engaged followership with ISIS terrorism.

Stephen Reicher

Psychologist, School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK

Madhura Padwal

Psychologist, School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK

221/5304 The power of ‘us’: Leaders’ confidence in ‘us’ inspires team members’ team confidence and performance

Two experimental field studies showed that athlete leaders have the capacity to shape team confidence among team members (in both positive and negative ways) and affect their performance, by strengthening team members’ identification with their team.  

Katrien Fransen

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Norbert VANBESELAERE

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Bert de Cuyper

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Filip Boen

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

221/5305 Experiments as a site of engaged leadership and engaged followership

Short abstract: We argue that all experiments involve identity leadership whereby Experimenters motivate Participants to display engaged followership and behave as 'good subjects'. This framework recognizes experimental outcomes as joint achievements of Experimenters and Participants and explains multiple instances of evidential variability.

S. Alexander Haslam

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/52 - Social influences on the regulation of emotion

Room: Machuca

Building on previous, individual-focused work on emotion regulation, recent research has examined the social influences on emotion-regulatory processes. This symposium proposes three different perspectives on such influences: intergroup- and interpersonal-level motivational influences, regulation of emotional influence, and unmotivated social influences.

Chair:

Ruthie Pliskin

Social Psychologist. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York, NY, USA.

221/5201 Right and left of emotion regulation choice: Disengaging from harm to the ingroup and outgroup

Two studies examined content-dependent ideological differences in emotion generation and regulation in response to conflict-related stimuli. Leftists experienced harm to the outgroup more intensely than rightists, and were consequently more likely to disengage from this content when regulating their emotions.

Ruthie Pliskin

Department of Psychology. New York University. New York, NY, USA

Eran Halperin

Ivcher School of Psychology. Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. Herzliya, Israel.

Daniel Bar-Tal

School of Education. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv-Jaffa, Israel.

Gal Sheppes

School of Psychological Sciences. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv-Jaffa, Israel

221/5202 Empathy is a choice: People spontaneously avoid empathy

Do people spontaneously choose to avoid empathy? I will discuss the Empathy Selection Task, which captures choices to select into or avoid empathy-eliciting situations. People exhibit a robust preference to avoid empathy, which associates with perceived psychological costs of empathy.

Christopher Cameron

Department of Psychology. The Pennsylvania State University. University Park, PA, USA.

Cendri Hutcherson

Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Toronto, ON, Canada.

Amanda M. Ferguson

Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Toronto, ON, Canada.

Julian A. Scheffer

Department of Psychology. The Pennsylvania State University. University Park, PA, USA.

Michael Inzlicht

Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Toronto, ON, Canada.

221/5203 Emotion contagion: A motivated account

Five experiments demonstrate peoples’ resistance to emotional contagion. People were influenced less by other’s emotions if they clashed with their emotional goals. Group members corrected for others’ inadequate reactions by amplifying their own. A computational model supported these motivational behaviors.

Amit Goldenberg

Department of Psychology. Stanford University. Palo Alto, CA, USA.

Eran Halperin

Ivcher School of Psychology. Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. Herzliya, Israel.

James J. Gross

Department of Psychology. Stanford University. Palo Alto, CA, USA.

221/5204 Interpersonal effects of regulated emotions

This paper addresses interpersonal effects of actual and perceived emotion regulation. I focus on individual- and relationship-level factors affecting the extent to which participants misread or fail to correct for another person’s regulatory motives when responding to their emotion expression.

Brian Parkinson

Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford, UK.

221/5205 The role of social context in regulating humiliation

Humiliation is a complex emotion, containing both anger and shame tendencies. In the present research we show that the social context upregulates some emotions and down regulates other emotions, depending on people’s concerns in that particular context.

Agneta Fischer

Programme group Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Liesbeth Mann

Programme group Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Allard Feddes

Programme group Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Bertjan Doosje

Programme group Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

221/67 - Perceptions of Morality across Group Lines

Room: Picasso

The current symposium examines perceptions of morality across group lines, providing novel insight as to how different outgroups are perceived in terms of their moral virtue, and potential downstream effects of such perceptions.

Chair:

Saulo Fernández Arregui

Assistant Professor. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia. UNED. Madrid. Spain.

221/6701 Justice Agents: Members of Discriminated Groups are Perceived to be Highly Committed to Social Justice

We demonstrated that a (seemingly) benign stereotype is directed at members of discriminated groups: they are viewed as being highly committed to social justice - more than members of non-discriminated groups and also more than the majority ingroup.

Tamar Saguy

Associate professor. Psychology Department. Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Israel.

Saulo Fernández

Assistant Professor. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED. Madrid. Spain.

Aviv Shany

Graduate student. Department of Psychology. The Hebrew University. Jerusalem. Israel.

Nyla Branscombe

Professor. Department of Psychology. The University of Kansas. Lawrence. USA.

221/6702 Naïve Moral Realism: A source of negative moral attributions and intolerance across group lines

This work points to the distinct adverse role of biased attributions of moral motives for intolerance across lines of disagreement, above and beyond that of cognitive ability, and especially in moral disagreements.

Michal Reifen Tagar

Assistant Professor. Psychology Department. Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Israel.

221/6703 Gendered Morality stereotypes, In-Group Favoritism, and In-Group Identification

Six studies (N = 2968) examined specific implicit and explicit stereotype content. Morality stereotypes appeared to play a distinct and central role in ingroup perceptions of men and women

Randi Garcia

Assistant Professor. Psychology Department. Smith College. Northampton. USA.

Colin W. Leach

PhD Department of Psychology University of Connecticut, USA

Luciana Carraro

Post-doc fellow. Department of Psychology. University of Padova. Italy.

221/6704 I am pleased when you act immorally!: Paradoxical effects of outgroup (im)morality

We investigated whether social targets lacking morality might elicit positive reactions in the observer. Individuals highly identified with their ingroup reported an enhanced self-view when confronted with an immoral outgroup member. Thus, outgroup immorality might positive responses in the observer.

Marco Brambilla

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Milano-Bicocca. Milan. Italy.

Simona Sacchi

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Milano-Bicocca. Milan. Italy.

Verena Graupmann

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. DePaul University. Chicago. USA.

221/6705 Symposium's General Discussion

Discussion

Nyla Branscombe

Professor. Department of Psychology. The University of Kansas. Lawrence. USA.

221/56 - Sexual prejudice across EU: beliefs, language, and norms

Room: Dinner 1

This symposium addresses the sexual prejudice across time in EU countries, and studies the cognitive, social, political and cultural underpinnings that promote old-fashion prejudice towards homosexuals and more strategic forms of sexual prejudice that prevent homosexuals from benefitting civil rights.

Chair:

Andrea Carnaghi

Associate Professor. Department of Life Sciences. University of Trieste. Trieste. Italy.

221/5601 The Decline of Homophobia in Europe and the US: Examining Possible Causes

Homophobia has recently declined in many countries. Our reanalysis of large-scale longitudinal survey data seeks to explain this trend. We found that the decline of homophobia cannot be reduced to broader social change, such as secularisation or economic growth.

Sebastian Eric Bartos

University of Surrey

Peter Hegarty

University of Surrey

Chris Fife-Schaw

University of Surrey

221/5602 Appeals to nature’ in marriage equality debates: A content analysis of traditional and social media

This study explores the role played by ‘appeals to nature’ in real-world debate about same-sex marriage. Content analysis of media coverage of the Irish marriage equality referendum investigates the frequency, targets and rhetorical functions of appeals to nature.

Cliodhna O'Connor

Maynooth University

221/5603 Biological theory of sexual orientation, gay people’s dehumanization and sexual prejudice

Three studies investigate whether initial attitudes towards homosexuality influence the way heterosexual people understand both perceived intergroup differences and biological explanations of sexual orientation, which then influences the extent to which they dehumanize gay men and lesbian women.

Juan M Falomir Pichastor

University of Geneva

Jacques Berent

University of Geneva

221/5604 The role of heteronormative ideology in supporting the beliefs on children raised by gay-male couples

In two studies we found that gender-role incongruent (vs. congruent) gay-male couples were thought to promote a female gender-identity development in children, and adequate development in female stereotypical domains (i.e., emotions). Normative-sexual orientation development was secured only through heterosexual

Andrea Carnaghi

University of Trieste

Joel Anderson

Australian Catholic University

221/5605 The impact of homophobic labels on gay men’ homophobia and body image: Coming-out as moderator

We tested whether homophobic and category-neutral labels were differently appraised as a function of coming-out. Results show that labels valence perceptions’ increased as participants’ coming-out increased. Moreover, coming-out moderated the relationship bewteen labels and internalized homophobia and body concerns.

Mauro Bianchi

Lusofona University, COPELABS

221/49 - Social Identity in a Globalizing World: innovations in the field of dual and multiple identities

Room: Dinner 2

We will present innovative research on multiple identities: intersections of inherited and achieved identities, acceptance of minorities’ dual identity claims at school, dual identity and collective action motivation, dual identity groups as potential gateways, and a discussion by Marilynn Brewer.

Chair:

Aharon Levy

Psychologist. Heymans Institute for Psychological Research. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands & The School of Psychology. The Interdisciplinary Center. Herzliya. Israel.

221/4901 Status conflict: When gender and professional status conflict

We investigate the intersection of inherited and achieved identities in the workplace, and its impact on social identification, perceived discrimination, and self-evaluation. We suggest that the results imply that gender and achieved professional identities interact differently among women and men.

Marion Chipeaux

Psychologist. Unité de psychologie sociale. Université de Genève. Genève. Switzerland

Clara Kulich

Psychologist. Unité de psychologie sociale. Université de Genève. Genève. Switzerland

Vincenzo Iacoviello

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Fabio Lorenzi-Cioldi

Psychologist. Unité de psychologie sociale. Université de Genève. Genève. Switzerland

221/4902 When dual identity claims are accepted in schools: Long-term effects on minority adjustment and performance

Two studies using representative longitudinal school surveys showed that minority adolescents had better school adjustment when their dual identity claims were accepted by their cross-ethnic peers and had higher belonging and performance when school policies valued cultural diversity through multiculturalism.

Jessie Hillekens

University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Laura Celeste

Psychologist. Social and Cultural Psychology Unit. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

Gülseli Baysu

Psychologist. Psychology Department. Kadir Has University. Istanbul. Turkey

Karen Phalet

Psychologist. Social and Cultural Psychology Unit. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/4903 Feeling included but invisible: Common, but not dual, identity undermines collective action among disadvantaged-group members.

In two experiments we show how seemingly well-intended interventions to reduce intergroup bias by emphasizing common, but not dual, identity decreases recognition of group-based inequality among minority group members—undermining motivation for change toward social equality.

Elze Ufkes

Psychologist. Psychology of Conflict, Risk & Safety. University of Twente. Enschede. The Netherlands

John Dovidio

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Yale University. New Haven. USA

221/4904 Ingroups, Outgroups, and the Gateway-Groups Between: The Potential of Dual Identities to Improve Intergroup Relations

In four studies we tested the potential of dual identity groups to act as gateways between the groups that represent the respective sources of the dual identity, and found that indeed the presence of such gateway groups improved intergroup orientations.

Aharon Levy

Psychologist. Heymans Institute for Psychological Research. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands & The School of Psychology. The Interdisciplinary Center. Herzliya. Israel

Tamar Saguy

Psychologist. The School of Psychology. The Interdisciplinary Center. Herzliya. Israel

Martijn van Zomeren

Psychologist. Heymans Institute for Psychological Research. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

Eran Halperin

Psychologist. The School of Psychology. The Interdisciplinary Center. Herzliya. Israel

221/4905 Discussant

Marilynn Brewer

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ohio State University. Columbus. USA

221/182 - Approach/avoidance compatibility effect and approach/avoidance training: underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions

Room: Andalucía III

Previous work demonstrated approach/avoidance compatibility and training effects. We will present recent work testing the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions of these effects. By presenting somewhat divergent results and accounts, our goal is to further our understanding of these effects.

Chair:

Dominique Muller

Professor of psychology. LIP/PC2S. Université Grenoble Alpes. France.

221/18201 Understanding action tendencies to approach and avoid: A default explanation versus an affective recoding account

Ample evidence suggests a default association between affective evaluations and specific actions. The affective recoding account emphasizes, however, the link between affective evaluations and action labeling. I will show that affective recoding can explain some but certainly not all results.

Mark Rotteveel

Professor of psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Amsterdam

221/18202 A grounded cognition framework for approach/avoidance tendencies.

This work underlies the importance of prototypical visual information in measuring approach/avoidance tendencies. Specifically, this information needs to be as close as possible to the perception associated to a forward-backward movement of the whole self in a first-person perspective.

Marine Rougier

Psychologist. Graduate student. Department of psychology. Université Grenoble Alpes. France.

Dominique Muller

Professor of psychology. Department of Psychology. Université Grenoble Alpes. France.

François Ric

Professor of psychology. Department of Psychology. Université de Bordeaux. France.

Theodore Alexopoulos

Assistant professor in psychology. Psychology Institute. Université Paris Descartes. France.

Benoite Aubé

Post doc in Psychology. Faculté de Psychologie et des Sciences de l’Education. Université Catholique de Louvain. Belgium.

Cédric Batailler

Psychologist. Graduate student. Department of psychology. Université Grenoble Alpes. France.

221/18203 Implicit approach/avoidance of stereotyped group predicts decisions towards its individual members

Implicit approach/avoidance reactions to a negatively stereotyped group predict decisions regarding its individual members. Predictions are limited to the members of the stereotyped category, and are stronger than those of explicit measures of stereotypes.

François Ric

Professor of psychology. Department of Psychology. Université de Bordeaux. France.

221/18204 Approach-Avoidance training of drinks consumption - testing determinants of the effect

Four studies provide evidence against AAT effects on explicit/implicit attitudes and consumption measures. We show that our null effects are not due to style of AAT framing, manipulation weakness, lacking foreknowledge about target taste or measurement order effects.

Anand Krishna

Psychologist. Graduate student. Department of Psychology. Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

Andreas Eder

Professor of psychology. Graduate student. Department of Psychology. Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

221/18205 Approach and avoidance Training Effects: The role of inferential processes

Previous research demonstrated that the repeated performance of approach and avoidance actions in response to a stimulus causes changes in (implicit) stimulus evaluations. In several high-powered experiments, we examine to what extent these effects depend on mental processes of inference.

Pieter Van Dessel

Psychologist. Department of experimental clinical and health psychology. Ghent University. Belgium.

Jan de Houwer

Professor of psychologist. Department of experimental clinical and health psychology. Ghent University. Belgium.

221/89 - Stigma and social relationships from the target’s perspective

Room: Andalucía II

Does stigma affect how we form, experience and maintain relationships? The aim of this symposium is to address this question and explore mechanisms by which stigma affects social relationships as well as individual and contextual factors that moderate these links.

Chair:

David Matthew Doyle

Lecturer in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

221/8901 What is couple-level minority stress and how does it impact the health of same-sex couples?

Same-sex couples are exposed to unique forms of stigma, representing risk to health above and beyond the risk associated with the stigma experienced as individuals. This presentation reports two dyadic studies demonstrating support for this theory of "Couple-Level Minority Stress.”

David Frost

Lecturer in Social and Health Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Surrey. Guildford. United Kingdom.

Allen J. LeBlanc

Professor of Sociology. Health Equity Institute. San Francisco State University. San Francisco. United States.

221/8902 How exposure to sexism affects women’s relationships with peers

We provide evidence from a field survey (N = 217 working women) and a laboratory experiment (N = 150 female university students) suggesting that women's exposure to sexism affects their relationship with peers, at work and outside work.

Manuela Barreto

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

Safi Darden

Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

Elena Dimitriou

Doctoral Student. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

Mark Atkinson

Associate Research Fellow. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

221/8903 Effect of stigma and concealment on avoidant friendship orientation and intimate relational behavior

In this research, we present two studies involving people coping with mental illness which provide support for a conceptual model that outlines pathways by which stigma limits intimate relational behavior through the activation of an avoidant regulatory orientation.

Laura Richman

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. Duke University. Durham. United States.

Micah R. Lattanner

Doctoral Student. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. Duke University. Durham. United States.

221/8904 Understanding context in the link between perceived stigma and social health: Moderation by structural stigma

Three studies examined the moderating role of structural stigma in the association between perceived stigma and social health. Across a meta-analysis, online and community study, perceived stigma was more deleterious for sexual minorities who were exposed to greater structural stigma.

David Matthew Doyle

Lecturer in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

Lisa Molix

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Tulane University. New Orleans. United States.

221/130 - Worldviews. What are they? What do we know about them? Why do they matter?

Room: Seminar

This symposium introduces the concept and latest empirical research on worldviews, and applies them to pressing social issues. It features philosophical insights and empirical studies, new worldview models and critical extensions of existing models, and proposes an integrated theoretical framework.

Chair:

Paul Bain

School of Psychology and Counselling. Queensland University of Technology (QUT). Brisbane. Australia.

221/13001 Beliefs about the world and social change: An overview and extension of worldview models

Recent advances in empirical approaches to worldviews are described, and a new type of worldview about how the world changes is proposed. Major worldview measures are shown to map out distinct conceptual space, and relationships with sustainability support are examined.

Paul Bain

School of Psychology, , Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia

221/13002 The predictive power of the sub-dimensions of social dominance orientation in explaining environmental apathy

Results of three studies show anti-egalitarianism to be the main sub-dimension of social dominance orientation (SDO) related to anti-environmentalism. Environmental apathy is motivated more by a desire to maintain inequality than to establish hierarchy.

Taciano L. Milfont

School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Samantha K. Stanley

School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Marc S. Wilson

School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Chris G. Sibley

School of Psychology, University of Auckland, New Zealand

221/13003 “The therapeutic worldview” and its discontents: Only a new worldview can save us now?

I address an overlooked aspect of the critique by Rieff and Lasch of the wider consequences of psychology’s breakthrough (“the triumph of the therapeutic”): a failure to feel injustice for future generations and thus respond appropriately to the climate crisis.

Ole Jacob Madsen

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

221/13004 Working with worldviews: Using the science of worldviews for improving communication, collaboration, and creative innovation.

Using the empirically validated Integrative Worldview Framework, I describe how these insights may stimulate reflexivity and understanding, thereby serving the communication, collaboration, and creative innovation that is urgently needed for addressing complex, social, global issues like climate change.

Annick de Witt

Psychologist, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands

221/129 - Trauma and religious belief

Room: Andalucía I

"This symposium presents three studies—a cross-cultural survey, a longitudinal study, and an experiment—that provide some evidence for the hypothesis that religion is motivated by traumatic experiences. "

Chair:

Jamin Halberstadt

Department of Psychology. University of Otago. Dunedin. New Zealand.

221/12905 Can we compare religiosity across cultures in traumatic life-event studies at all?

Participants in 12 countries who reported on religious supernatural beliefs did so in a cross-culturally comparable way. For the first time ever, an identical factor structure of religiosity sensu SBS-6 can be assessed across cultures.

Matthias Bluemke

GESIS Leibniz Institute of the Social Sciences, Mannheim. Germany

Jonathan Jong

Research Fellow, Coventry University, UK

Jamin Halberstadt

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

221/12901 Traumatic life events and religiosity in eight countries

Across Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, and nonreligious samples, traumatic life events predicted religiosity. This effect was moderated by religious upbringing and socioeconomic status. We also found some evidence that effect of trauma on emotional well-being is mediated by religiosity.

Jonathan Jong

Research Fellow, Coventry University, UK

Robert Ross

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Royal Holloway University of London

Ryan McKay

Reader, Royal Holloway University of London

Jamin Halberstadt

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

221/12902 Death salience moderates the effect of trauma on religiosity

Participants were more likely report “private” religious behaviour (e.g., prayer), but not “public” religious behaviour, if they had experienced a death-related trauma in the previous six years. Equally traumatic experiences that did not involve death did not predict religiosity.

Jamin Halberstadt

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Zoe Morris Trainor

Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Jonathan Jong

Research Fellow, Coventry University, UK

221/12903 The relationship between life events and religiosity: A priming study

We experimentally manipulated recall of negative life events then measured implicit religiosity. Consistent with a “Religious Comfort Hypothesis”, participants who recalled negative life events showed greater levels of implicit religiosity than those who recalled positive or neutral events.

Robert Ross

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Royal Holloway University of London

Ryan McKay

Reader, Royal Holloway University of London

Jonathan Jong

Research Fellow, Coventry University, UK

Jamin Halberstadt

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

11.10 - 12.50 h. Blitz: Presentations VI

Session 11: Intergroup contact and prejudice reduction

Room: Albéniz

221/8101 ‘Cross-ethnic friendship self-efficacy’: A new predictor of cross-ethnic friendship and attitudes among diverse adolescents

Ethnically diverse adolescents (N = 101; 11-13 years) completed measures of cross-ethnic friendship self-efficacy (CEFSE), and cross-ethnic friendship. CEFSE was significantly positively related to motivation for new CE friendships, CE friendship persistence, outgroup attitudes, and CE friendships quality and quantity.

Rhiannon Turner

Professor, School of Behavioural Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

Lindsey Cameron

Senior Lecturer, School of Psycholgy, University of Kent, UK

Sabahat Cigdem Bagci

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Isik University, Turkey

Afiya Carby

School of Psycholgy, University of Kent, UK

221/8102 Do they want contact?: Perceived outgroup -and ingroup- desire for contact and positive interactions

Three studies tested perceived ingroup and outgroup desire for intergroup contact as predictors of actual contact. Results showed that the perception regarding the outgroup’s (and not the ingroup’s) willingness to interact predicts positive contact, which then relates to improved attitudes.

Sofia Stathi

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology and Counselling, University of Greenwich, UK

Samantha Pendleton

Department of Psychology and Counselling, University of Greenwich, UK

Loris Vezzali

Associate Professor, Department of Education and Human Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

221/8103 Expectancies as direct predictors of intergroup contact and indirect predictors of cultural distance and attitudes

We integrate the concept of cultural distance with Berry’s acculturation model (1997) in a sample of 397 Italians and 142 immigrants. Results revealed that expectancies predict contact, which in turn impacts on acculturation strategies via reduced cultural distance.

Dino Giovannini

Professor, Department of Education and Human Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

Loris Vezzali

Associate Professor, Department of Education and Human Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

Gian Antonio Di Bernardo

Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Education and Human Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

Sofia Stathi

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology and Counselling, University of Greenwich, UK

221/8104 How injunctive and descriptive norms predict ethnic minority and majority students’ contact intentions over time

This longitudinal research demonstrates how injunctive and descriptive norms predict changes in ethnic minority and majority youth’s contact intentions over time, enhancing those intentions among majority students. For minority students, however, school norms are the primary enhancers of contact intentions.

Roberto Gonzalez

Professor, Escuela de Psicolgía, P. Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

Eduardo Mora

Escuela de Psicolgía, P. Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

Linda Tropp

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, USA,

Daniel Valdenegro

Escuela de Psicolgía, P. Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

Belen Alvarez

Escuela de Psicolgía, P. Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

Bernadette Paula Luengo

Psychology Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, Escuela de Psicolgía, P. Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

Gloria Jimenez-Moya

PhD in Social Psychology, Assistant Professor, School of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

221/1196 Who needs intergroup contact? Intercultural traits moderate contact effects in sojourners

For foreigners, contact with locals may be more or less stressful depending on their adaptive intercultural traits. We found that international students only needed contact with locals for their adaptation if they were low on open-mindedness and on social initiative.

Kinga Bierwiaczonek

PhD Candidate, Center for Social Research and Intervention (CIS-IUL), University Institute of Lisbon (ISCTE-IUL), Lisbon, Portugal

Sven Waldzus

Associate Professor, Center for Social Research and Intervention (CIS-IUL), University Institute of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

Karen van der Zee

Full Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, Free University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

221/1102 Imagined contact in high-conflict settings: The role of group identification and the perspective of miinority group members

Two experiments investigated imagined contact within a high-conflict setting. Imagined contact improved outgroup attitudes among Turkish participants (majority) who highly identified with their ethnic ingroup. Among Kurdish participants, imagined contact decreasef conflict perception and negative expectations from the majority group.

Sabahat Cigdem Bagci

Assistant Professor. Psychology Department. Isik University. Istanbul. Turkey

Zeynep Ecem Piyale

Research assistant. Psychology Department. Isik University. Istanbul. Turkey

Efsane Ebcim

Undergraduate student. Psychology Department. Isik University. Istanbul. Turkey

221/1887 The justice components of intergroup contact

Restorative justice is a response to crime that includes meetings between victims and offenders. Parallels between minority group members’ experiences of intergroup contact and victims’ experiences of restorative justice teach us that analysis of intergroup contact is incomplete without the adoption of a justice framework.

Diana Batchelor

PhD Researcher, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford.

221/1607 Positive imagined contact is actively chosen: Exploring determinants and consequences of volitional intergroup imagery in a conflict-ridden setting

We investigated actively ‘chosen’ imagined contact in a setting defined by intergroup conflict- Cyprus. Over 2 studies Turkish Cypriots disproportionately leaned towards visualizing positive intergroup interactions which reflected both positive mood regulation and valenced confirmation biases.

Shenel Husnu

Psychologist. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts & Science, Eastern Mediterranean University

Stefania Paolini

Psychologist. The University of Newcastle, Australia

221/1841 Intergroup Contact and Reconciliation among Liberian Refugees: A Multilevel Analysis in a Multiple Groups Setting

Direct and extended contact predicted intra-individual attitudes, as well as overall trust, empathy, and forgiveness. The relation between contact and attitudes was stronger for those more traumatized by the war, suggesting that contact may be particularly relevant for them.

Pablo De Tezanos Pinto

Psychologist. Assistant professor. Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile

Agostino Mazziotta

Psychologist. University of Hagen. Germany.

Friederike Feuchte

Psychologist. Independent. Liberia.

221/1355 The Secondary Transfer Effect via Attitude, Empathy, and Anxiety Generalisation: Longitudinal and Cross-Sectional Evidence

This presentation describes three studies of intergroup contact’s secondary transfer effect (STE). Study 1 offers longitudinal experimental support for the STE of direct and extended contact. Studies 2 and 3 cross-sectionally demonstrate the STE via attitude, empathy, and anxiety generalisation.

Hermann Swart

Social Psychologist, Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Hannari De Beer

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Lizelle Openshaw

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Anri Nell

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Cara Daiber

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Miles Hewstone

Social Psychologist, Professor, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, England

221/1295 Spatial aspects of prejudices: Can visual experiences of chaos and disorder be related to environmental distance?

In 3 studies it was found that: (1) urban disorder sensitivity (UDS) was a predictor of prejudice toward immigrants, (2) out group visual contamination (OVC) mediate relation between UDS and environmental distance towards Muslims; (3) OVC may be triggered by visual pollution

Michał Jaśkiewicz

University of Gdańsk

221/1546 The In-between Identity: the Case of the Druze in the Context of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

In-between groups are those immersed in a conflict but do not belong exclusively to the rival groups. The Druze in Israel are an in-between case. Findings suggest that construing the conflict depends on negotiating one's sets of different social identities.

Slieman Halabi

Psychologist. International Max Planck Research School on Adapting Behavior in a Fundamentally Uncertain World, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena. Germany.

Yechiel Klar

Psychologist. Professor. School of Psychological Sciences. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel.

Katja Hanke

Psychologist. Senior Researcher. Survey Design and Methodology. GESIS-Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences. Mannheim. Germany

221/1199 Becoming one of them: High levels of cross-cultural adaptation promote ingroup projection

In a Reverse Correlation study we found that representations of locals held by highly adapted sojourners were rated most positive and similar to themselves by non-locals, but not by locals, suggesting ingroup projection to locals as outcome of intercultural adaptation.

Sven Waldzus

Associate Professor, Center for Social Research and Intervention (CIS-IUL), University Institute of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

Kinga Bierwiaczonek

PhD Candidate, Center for Social Research and Intervention (CIS-IUL), University Institute of Lisbon (ISCTE-IUL), Lisbon, Portugal

Karen van der Zee

Full Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, Free University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

221/1490 A new era in the study of intergroup nonverbal behaviour: Studying intergroup dyadic interactions “online”

We examined predictors and consequences of intergroup nonverbal behaviour by relying on new technologies and new objective indices. In three studies, both in the laboratory and in the field with children, behaviour was a function of implicit prejudice.

Gian Antonio Di Bernardo

Social Psychologist, Post-Doc Fellow. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy

Loris Vezzali

Social Psychologist. Associate Professor. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy

Andrea Palazzi

PhD Student in Computer Engineering. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

Simone Calderara

Computer Engineer. Assistant Professor. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

Nicola Bicocchi

Computer Engineer. Assistant Professor. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

Franco Zambonelli

Computer Engineer. Full Professor. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

Session 12 (Part I): Hierarchies and inequality

Room: Machado

221/1177 Envy, Pride, and the American Dream. How Work Ethics Beliefs Are Linked to Status-Related Emotions.

The status-related emotions envy and pride should hinge on personal beliefs about status attainment. We show that whereas the belief in Protestant work ethic predicts benign envy and authentic pride, fatalistic beliefs predict malicious envy and hubristic pride.

Lisa Blatz

Social Cognition Center Cologne

Jens Lange

Social Cognition Center

Jan Crusius

Assistant Professor of Social Psychology, Social Cognition Center Cologne, University of Cologne. Germany.

221/1503 Making sense of subjective and objective hierarchy: Agency reflects status and competence reflects respect

Whereas Agency judgments reflect the objective position in social hierarchy (i.e. Status), Competence judgments are more related to subjective social regard (i.e. Respect) and allow taking into account perceived under- or overestimation of the target’s Status.

Antonin Carrier

Postdoc, Faculty of psychology and educational sciences, Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-neuve, Belgium.

221/1604 Comfortably numb: The palliative effects of system justification on the health and happiness of members of the LGBTQ+ community

Members of stigmatized groups are buffered from being socially undervalued if they deny that their group is discriminated against. After accounting for personal discrimination respondents have faced, denial of LGBTQ+ group discrimination is associated with greater subjective well-being and health. 

Alexandra Suppes

Research Associate. New York University, Abu Dhabi. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Jaime Napier

Professor. New York University, Abu Dhabi. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Jojanneke Van der Toorn

Professor. Department of Social, Health, and Organizational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

221/1606 Poor is Pious": Distinctiveness Threat Increases Glorification of Poverty among the Poor

The current study examines whether a threat to group distinctiveness motivates the poor to glorify poverty as an identity management strategy. Research on social identity theory has shown that threat to ingroup distinctiveness can motivate people to positively differentiate their group from similar outgroups on relevant dimensions of comparison

Nechumi Yaffe

Social psychologist School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC),Herzliya.

Nevin Solak

Psychologist, School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya

Eran Halperin

Psychologist, School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC),Herzliya

221/1635 Accounting for unequal access to higher education: The role of social identity factors.

In this field study in secondary schools, we examine how perceptions of identity compatibility, social fit and individual ability influence social mobility among low status group members.

Marlon Nieuwenhuis

Social Psychologist. Dr. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. United Kingdom.

Antony Manstead

Social Psychologist. Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. Wales. UK.

Matthew Easterbrook

Social Psychologist. Dr. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. UK.

221/1020 Subjective low SES makes students less likely to delay gratification.

In two studies, we investigated whether subjective socioeconomic status contributes to the income-achievement gap by increasing individuals’ impulsivity. We found that subjective feelings of poverty led students to prioritize immediate rewards over long-term academic rewards, resulting in worse academic outcomes.

Heidi Vuletich

Psychologist. Doctoral student. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Chapel Hill. United States.

Hannah Monshontz

Psychologist. Doctoral student. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. Duke University. Durham. United States.

Elizabeth Marsh

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. Duke University. Durham. United States.

Keith Payne

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Chapel Hill. United States

221/1609 ¿Will you class-ify? Economic inequality and social class salience.

Economic inequality perception was manipulated by exposing participantes to a fake article. According with our hypthotesis social class criteria were used more in the high inequality condition in order to classify the pictures of people.

Davide Melita

Psychologist. Phd student. Social Psychology department. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón

Psychologist. Professor. Social Psychology Department. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

Guillermo B. Willis

Psychologist. Professor. Social Psychology Department. University of Granada. Granada. Spain

221/1128 When uncertainty tears groups apart: hierarchy promotes performance-detracting power struggles when groups face uncertainty

Opposing prevailing wisdom that hierarchy helps groups that face uncertainty, we show with a field-study of 161 organizational work groups that hierarchy hurts groups when there is uncertainty, as in these situations hierarchy ignites performance-detracting power struggles between members.

Lisanne van Bunderen

PhD student, Organisation and Personnel Management, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands

221/1135 Dominance, Prestige, Leadership: Empirical differentiation between three components of power/hierarchy strivings with the DoPL scales

Using factor analyses we developed the DoPL scales measuring three distinct desires to attain power/higher ranking in a hierarchy: dominance, prestige and leadership. These desires relate differently to self-reported dispositions, rank in organisations and behaviour in the dictator game.

Felix Suessenbach

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. United Kindgom.

Adam Moore

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. United Kingdom.

Steve Loughnan

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. United Kingdom.

Felix Schönbrodt

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Munich. Munich. Germany

221/1892 Justice for all? – Effects of intergroup similarity on standards of injustice, judgments of harm and collective guilt.

Three experiments show that perceived similarity of an outgroup leads to shifting standards regarding in-group injustices. Effects of perceived similarity on collective guilt were sequentially mediated by standards of injustice and judgments of harm.

Alison Benbow

Psychologist. PhD. Institute of Psychology. FernUniversität in Hagen. Hagen. Germany.

Markus Barth

Psychologist. PhD. Institute of Psychology. University of Leipzig. Germany.

221/1455 The Irony of Harmony: The case of gender

Two studies examined whether heterosexual romantic relationships can lead women to view gender inequality as acceptable. The occurrence of optimal contact within the relationship was associated with women’s optimistic perceptions regarding gender equality, moderated by their level of sexism.

Danit Sobol

School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel

Noa Schori Eyal

School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel

Tamar Saguy

School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel

Session 12 (Part II): New methodologies and methodological considerations

Room: Machado

221/1654 Five things to make social cognition (more) social

The question of human cognition is still haunts us. The current social cognition is only limited to the metaphor of a lonely thinker and and a cognitive miser. We need to take into account the symbolic, narrative and representational aspects of our cogntion. Also we need new and imporved research methods that incorporate all of our knowledge.

Péter Restás

Social Psychologist, Assistant lecturer, Psychology Department, University of Pécs, Hungary

221/1844 On the necessity and usefulness of measures of independent variables to social psychology

Following Sigall and Mills (1998), we question the necessity of manipulation checks in view of recent methodological concerns. We argue that manipulation checks are neither necessary, nor useful and go further by claiming that their use can impede scientific progress.

Theodore Alexopoulos

Assistant Professor, Psychological Institute, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France

Marie-Pierre Fayant

Assistant Professor, Psychological Institute, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France

Aurore Lemonnier

PhD student, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France

Emilie Retsin

PhD student, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France

Harold Sigall

Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland, College Park, USA

12.50 - 14.30 h. Lunch (Buffet)

13.20 - 14.20 h. Round Table Discussion: ERC and its funding possibilities for Social Psychology

Room: Manuel Falla

14.30 - 16.10 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions VII

221/76 - Men and stereotypes

Room: Manuel Falla

This symposium brings together research on the relatively unexplored area of effects of stereotypes on men, and discusses the effect of (status) threat and (implicit) associations between men and communality on men and the larger society.

Chair:

Sanne Van Grootel

PhD Student. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/7601 Changing stereotypes/changing values: Men identify with communion when communion ≠ female

Two studies investigated the relationship between implicit gender stereotypes and men’s relatively lower communal self-concept. Findings suggest that associating communal values with women constrains men’s self-association with these values, but that retraining communal = male can boost men’s communal self-associations.

Katharina Block

PhD Student. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada.

Toni Schmader

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada.

221/7602 Affirming communal manhood to buffer masculinity threat and increase male engagement in communal roles

This research examines the effect of reaffirming masculinity after threat on male engagement in communal roles. Findings suggest that broadening the definition of masculinity to include more communal aspects increases interest and intent to engage in these nontraditional gender roles.

Sanne Van Grootel

PhD Student. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

Colette van Laar

Professor. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

Loes Meeussen

Post Doctoral researcher. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

Jenny Veldman

PhD Student. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/7603 Zero sum beliefs and resistance to gender fair workplace policies

Endorsement of zero sum beliefs (ZSBs) negatively predicted men’s and women’s support for gender fair workplace policies, and exposure to a status threat decreased men’s (but not women’s) support for gender fair workplace policies, mediated by increases in their ZSBs.

Jennifer Bosson

Associate Professor. Department of psychology. University of South Florida. Tampa. USA.

Joseph Vandello

Professor. Department of psychology. University of South Florida. Tampa. USA.

Sophie Kuchynka

PhD Student. Department of psychology. University of South Florida. Tampa. USA.

Curtis Puryear

PhD Student. Department of psychology. University of South Florida. Tampa. USA.

221/7604 Structural predictors of the domestic division of labor: A dyadic approach

This study draws on work-family and gender research to examine how structural variables (e.g., salary and employment) influence the domestic division of labor. Data were collected from 118 couples with young children and analyzed using APIM dyadic analyses.

Leire Gartzia

Assistant professor. Department of People Management in Organizations. Deusto Business school, University of Deusto. Bilbao. Spain.

Colette van Laar

Professor. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

Toni Schmader

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada.

221/7605 One woman’s success being her man’s loss: The impact of partner dynamics on relational outcomes

We investigate partner dynamics of less-traditional, heterosexual couples (woman has higher status than her partner) and find that women risk a dominance penalty, whereas men risk a weakness penalty. This is further associated with lower reported relationship quality.

Melissa Vink

PhD Student. Social, Health and Organizational psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Belle Derks

Professor. Social, Health and Organizational psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Naomi Ellemers

Professor. Social, Health and Organizational psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Tanja van der Lippe

Professor. Department of Sociology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/196 - Explicit effects on implicit attitudes: New perspectives on mechanisms of attitude formation and change

Room: Machuca

Once considered impervious to explicit influences, mounting evidence suggests that implicit attitudes are strongly influenced by explicit factors. This symposium features new research on how explicit processes can influence implicit attitudes and highlights novel theoretical accounts to understand this interplay.

Chair:

David Amodio

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/19601 What factors contribute to the effect of choice behavior on attitude formation?

The effect of co-occurrence with positive stimuli on liking a stimulus is smaller than the effect of actions (choosing versus avoiding the stimulus), which is smaller than the effect of semantic information (whether the stimulus should be protected or eliminated).

Yoav Bar-Anan

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Beer-Sheva. Israel

221/19602 Instrumental learning of attitudes and traits: Neural substrates and implications for choice

Three studies demonstrate the instrumental learning of reward and trait associations with novel individuals. Behavioral, fMRI, and computational modeling data reveal that while reward learning functions like an implicit attitude, explicit trait knowledge dominates in neural processing and choice behavior.

David Amodio

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Leor Hackel

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Stanford University. Stanford, CA. USA.

221/19603 Change We Must Believe In: The role of believability in updating implicit first impressions

In three studies, we show that the believability of counter-attitudinal information influences the extent to which implicit impressions are revised in response to that information. Implications for theories of implicit attitude formation and change are discussed.

Jeremy Cone

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Williams College. Williamstown, MA. USA.

Melissa Ferguson

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Cornell University. Ithaca, MA. USA.

221/19604 Implicit attitudes can shift propositionally

Evaluative statements (ES) produce stronger implicit attitude shifts than repeated evaluative pairings (REP). REP do not add value to ES and learning via REP asymptotes within a few trials, suggesting that both learning modalities create propositions about the attitude object.

Benedek Kurdi

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Harvard University. Cambridge, MA. USA.

Mahzarin Banaji

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Harvard University. Cambridge, MA. USA.

221/19605 The impact of ambivalence on attitude acquisition and change via evaluative conditioning

Neutral and ambivalent stimuli may differ in their potential for attitude acquisition and change as well as the mechanisms underlying these effects. The present research investigates the effects of ambivalent conditioned stimuli in an evaluative conditioning paradigm.

Katharina Theresa Berger

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Tübingen. Germany

Mandy Hütter

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Tübingen. Germany

221/201 - Predictors of and Responses to Violent Radicalisation

Room: Picasso

"This symposium examines the dynamics of violent radicalisation and co-radicalisation. Five talks discuss 1) why individuals support radical groups and 2) responses to violent acts that may undermine harmonious intergroup relations and enforce outgroup members’ violent radicalisation. "

Chairs:

Sandy Schumann

Social Psychologist. Post-doctoral Research Associate. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. United Kingdom.

Stephen Reicher

Psychologist. School of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of St. Andrews. St. Andrews. United Kingdom.

221/20101 Do radical groups attract people with specific psychological needs? An empirical exploration

Two studies examined whether we can distinguish between people with different needs (sensation seekers, identity seekers, justice seekers and significance seekers), and how these needs, in combination with other determinants, are related to attraction to radical groups.

Bertjan Doosje

Professor. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Jaap van der Veen

Master student. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Alex Macdougall

University of Manchester. Manchester. United Kingdom.

Allard Feddes

Post-doctoral researcher. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Lars Nickolson

University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/20102 The Process of Reactive Co-Radicalisation: How Perceived Threat Facilitates Support for Radical Groups

We examined the process of reactive co-radicalisation in a longitudinal survey study in Germany (N = 1053). Results showed that perceived threat by fundamentalist Islam encouraged citizens to endorse radical leaders, which promoted support for the anti-Muslim movement Pegida.

Sandy Schumann

University of Oxford

Katja Hanke

Senior Researcher. GESIS - Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences. Mannheim. Germany.

Diana Boer

Professor, University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany

James Liu

Professor, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

221/20103 Je suis… affected? How Islamophobia and emotional reactions to terrorist attacks shape sociopolitical attitudes

We examined the interplay of islamophobia, emotional reactions to terrorist attacks and support for restrictive governmental policies based on data collected in the wake of recent attacks (Charlie Hebdo, Paris, Nice) in different populations (Belgium, France, Germany).

Felicitas Flade

Doctoral student. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Djouaria Ghilani

Doctoral student. Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium.

Pia Lamberty

Doctoral student. University of Mainz. Mainz. Germany.

221/20104 Mobilisation? What mobilisation? How did the French society respond to the terrorist attacks in January 2015: a mobilisation nexus studied online

We highlight and discuss the difference in the French civil society’s collective response to the CharlieHebdo and to the anti-Semitic HyperCacher terrorist attacks in Paris (January 2015) based on data collected online in their immediate aftermath (Facebook N=840000; N=1.38M tweets).

Andreea Ernst-Vintila

Associate Professor. Laboratoire Parisien de Psychologie Sociale. Université Paris Ouest. Paris. France.

Pierre Ratinaud

Laboratoire d'Études et de Recherches Appliquées en Sciences Sociales. Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3. Toulouse. France.

Nikos Smyrnaios

Laboratoire d'Études et de Recherches Appliquées en Sciences Sociales. Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3. Toulouse. France.

Laurent Licata

Professor. Centre de Recherche en Psychologie Sociale et Interculturelle. Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels. Belgium.

Irina Macovei

University of Iasi. Iasi. Romania.

221/20105 Intergroup Kali Morality in a violent intergroup conflict: Explicit and implicit double moral standards

"Kali's Morality," a double standard moral judgment where outgroup's misdeeds are perceived as reprehensible whereas the same ingroup's acts are viewed as acceptable, perpetuate violent intergroup conflicts. Jewish and Palestinian participants explicitly endorsed moral symmetry but implicitly practiced moral asymmetry.

Yechiel Klar

Professor. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel.

Itai Sevitt

Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel.

Noa Schori-Eyal

Post-doctoral researcher. Interdisciplinary Center Herzeliya. Herzliya. Israel.

221/180 - The body politic: Visceral reactions to mistreatment

Room: Dinner 1

A variety of methods are used to examine how mistreatment produces various visceral reactions in body (neuroendocrine, EEG/ERP, cardiovascular), mind (attention, affect, emotion, action tendencies), and action (aggression, persistence, help, confrontation, protest).

Chair:

Daan Scheepers

Associate Professor of Social Psychology. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands.

221/18001 The hormonal impact of differing degrees of social exclusion

People can be social excluded due to a mild social slight or due to extreme violence and human atrocities. We explore the hormonal underpinnings of each as they relate to subsequent pro and anti-social behaviour.

Lasana Harris

University College London, London, UK

Korrina Duffy

Duke University

Steve Stanton

Oakland University

Tanya Chartrand

Duke University

Mike Niconchuk

University College London

Ana Guinote

University College London

221/18002 Police Violence and Black Protest: Attention, Relevance, Visceral Reactions

Four experiments used a multi-system view of appraisal to examine visceral reactions to known and novel images of police violence and Black protest against it (e.g., Black Lives Matter). Black and White participants evidenced differential attention, emotion, and motivation.

Colin W. Leach

University of Connecticut

Mora Reinka

University of Connecticut

221/18003 Physiological responses to social identity threat

We addressed social identity threat using physiological indicators of challenge and threat. Negative group feedback (social identity threat) was as threatening as negative personal feedback. However, group identification buffered against social identity threat, and even turned it into challenge.

Daan Scheepers

Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands

221/18004 Managing Emotions in the Face of Discrimination: Implications for Individual and Group Outcomes

Individuals benefit affectively when they reflect on past negative experiences from a distanced, rather than immersed, perspective. This presentation considers the implications of these emotion-regulation strategies in the face of past discrimination experiences for individuals’ affective outcomes and collective-action tendencies.

Jennifer Richeson

Yale University

Dorainne Levy

Indiana University

Galen Bodenhausen

Northwestern University

Maureen Craig

New York University

221/164 - The psychology of living abroad and coming home: Identity, interpersonal relations, and socio-cultural adaptation

Room: Dinner 2

This symposium illuminates the psychological experience of living abroad and then returning home. The talks demonstrate how living abroad can alter the self-concept and change the dynamics of our interpersonal relationships, which often make returning home a stressful experience.

Chair:

Matthew Easterbrook

Lecturer in Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. United Kingdom.

221/16401 Is self stability related to the experience of living abroad? A 10-year longitudinal study

In this longitudinal study, we found that the experience of living abroad was related to a curvilinear pattern, with an initial decrease followed by an increase, of identity profile stability and rank-order stability of self-concept clarity.

Elisabetta Crocetti

Senior Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

Monica Rubini

Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

Wim Meeus

Utrecht University, The Netherlands; Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Susan Branje

Utrecht University, The Netherlands;

221/16402 Host nation identification as the foundation for nourishing host-national relationships among international students

Two studies show that international students who identified with the host nation formed more and stronger relationships with host nationals, and thus had lower stress. This suggests that contextually relevant identities are the foundation for forming relationships whilst abroad.

Matthew Easterbrook

Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

Nicolas Geeraert

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Essex, Colecester, UK

221/16403 A dyad approach on immigrant mothers’ and adolescents’ socio-cultural adaptation

This mother-adolescent-dyad study tested adolescents’ and mothers’ mutual effects on their socio-cultural adaptation difficulties. Results indicated that immigrant adolescents have an effect on their mothers, particularly when they reported many family obligations. No effect from mothers to adolescents was found.

Peter Titzmann

Professor of Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, Leibniz University Hanover, Germany

Burkhard Gniewosz

University of Salzburg, Austria

221/16404 Culture shock and reverse culture shock: A longitudinal analysis of stress trajectories during and post

How do sojourners deal with returning home after a year abroad? We present sojourners’ (N = 1484) levels of acculturative stress at 3, 12, and 31 weeks post-arrival, analyse antecedents of stress, and examine stress trajectories during and post sojourn.

Nicolas Geeraert

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Essex, Colecester, UK

Kali Demes

University of Essex, Colecester, UK

221/16405 Coming back, coming home? Cross-cultural re-entry problems indicate a shift in cultural identity

This research shows that re-entry problems upon a sojourn abroad indicate reconsideration of home cultural commitment (Study 1; N = 510) as well as disengagement from the home culture and identification with the host culture (Study 2; N = 484).

Dirk Kranz

Departmental Psychology; Universitaet Trier; Germany

Alexandra Schlack

Departmental Psychology; Universitaet Trier; Germany

Arne Smaczny

Departmental Psychology; Universitaet Trier; Germany

221/183 - Generalization of learning: Exploring its manifestation and the factors that affect it.

Room: Andalucía III

This symposium examines how learning by experience (evaluative-conditioning, self-referencing, predictive learning) is generalized to novel stimuli. We elaborate on different types of generalization (e.g. perceptual, cue-based, symbolic/intersecting regularities) and examine different moderators and mediators of generalization (e.g. psychological distance).

Chair:

Hadar Ram

Psychologist. PhD Student. School of Psychological Science. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel.

221/18301 On the Symbolic Generalization of Likes and Dislikes

We distinguish between perceptual and symbolic evaluative generalization. Across five experiments, we demonstrate how evaluative responses towards a focal stimulus can propagate to other stimuli when they are related on the basis of symbolic similarity, opposition, or comparison.

Sean Hughes

Psychologist. Dr. Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology. Ghent University. Ghent. Belgium.

Dermot Barnes-Holmes

Psychologist. Prof. Psychologist. Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology. Ghent University. Ghent. Belgium

João Henrique De Almeida

Psychologist. Dr. Department of Psychology. Universidade Federal De Sao Carlos. Sao Carlos. Brazil.

Ian Stewart

Psychologist. Dr. School of Psychology. National University of Ireland Galway. Galway. Ireland.

Jan de Houwer

Psychologist. Prof. Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology. Ghent University. Ghent. Belgium.

221/18302 Rule - and Similarity-Based Generalization of Evaluations Acquired Through Evaluative Conditioning

We investigate the distinction of rule-based and similarity-based generalizations in Evaluative Conditioning. Across four experiments we observe both types of generalization for categorization of novel stimuli, but only similarity-based generalizations for evaluation of novel stimuli.

Fabia Högden

Psychologist. PhD student. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Christian Unkelbach

Psychologist. Prof. Social Cognition Center Cologne. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Christoph Stahl

Psychologist. Prof. Department of Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/18303 Acquisition and Application of Generalized Attitudes in Evaluative Conditioning

The present research differentiates two types of generalization functions in evaluative conditioning: similarity and the application of valent cues. We investigate the conditioning of cues, its moderation by stimulus and context factors, and the conditioned cue’s application to novel stimuli.

Mandy Hütter

Psychologist. Prof. Department of Psychology. University of Tübingen. Tübingen. Germany.

Katharina Berger

Psychologist. PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Tübingen. Tübingen. Germany.

Florian Kutzner

Psychologist. Prof. Institute of Psychology. University of Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

Klaus Fiedler

Psychologist. Prof. Institute of Psychology. University of Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

221/18304 Transferring the Self Referencing Effect Across Stimuli via Intersecting Regularities

We exploited the intersecting regularities principle to test a self-referencing effect towards different classes of target objects, either directly or indirectly related to the self. Across four studies, direct and indirect self-referencing effect showed reliably on both implicit and explicit

Simone Mattavelli

PhD Student. Department of Psychology. University of Milan-Bicocca. Milan. Italy.

Juliette Richetin

Psychologist. Dr. Department of Psychology. University of Milan-Bicocca. Milan. Italy.

Marco Perugini

Psychologis. Prof. Department of Psychology. University of Milan-Bicocca. Milan. Italy.

221/18305 Generalization Gradient as a Function of Psychological Distance

We used a predictive learning paradigm to examine how psychological distance, manipulated as the probability of the outcome appearance following a cue, influence generalization gradient. Results from both experiments showed that although learning was not affected by distance, generalization was.

Hadar Ram

Psychologist. PhD Student. School of Psychological Science. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel

Nira Liberman

Psychologist. Prof. School of P Psychological Science. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel

Dieter Struyf

Psychologist. Dr. Centre for Psychology of Learning and Experimental Psychopathology. Leuven University. Leuven. Belgium.

Bram Vervliet

Psychologist. Prof. Centre for Psychology of Learning and Experimental Psychopathology. Leuven University. Leuven. Belgium.

221/146 - Forgiving a close other in high risky situations

Room: Andalucía II

This symposium examines the positive and negative consequences of forgiveness, depending on the risky situations in which it occurs. Forgiveness has a protective role in divorce, workplace offences, and infidelity. However, in a domestic violence context, forgiveness has negative consequences.

Chair:

Inmaculada Valor-Segura

Associate Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Spain.

221/14601 The role of partner forgiveness in Intimate Partner violence

The aim of the current longitudinal study is to explore the role of partner forgiveness on re-victimisation and women well-being. We expect that: 1) forgiveness mediated by the intention to return with the partner, predict woman re-victimisation at time two; 2) unforgiveness is negatively associated to women well-being over time

Camillo Regalia

Full Professor. Department of Psychology. Catholic University of Sacred Heart. Milan. Italy

Eleonora Crapolicchio

PhD student. Department of Psychology. Catholic University of Sacred Heart. Milan. Italy

Anna Costanza Baldry

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology Second University of Naples- Federico II. Italy

Vincenza Cinquegrana

PhD. student. Department of Psychology Second University of Naples- Federico II. Italy

221/14602 The protective effect of forgiveness following parental divorce

Many children have to cope with the divorce of their parents. In this study, we found that forgiveness may be a protective factor that can help to prevent the negative consequences of divorce on children’s psychological well-being.

Reine van der Wal

Assistant Professor. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands

Catrin Finkenauer

Professor. Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands

221/14603 Pathways from forgiveness to well-being at the workplace: Does gender and hierarchical status matter?

The present study provided evidence that: a) forgiveness for workplace offences is related to personal well-being through the mediation of victim-offender relationship quality and job satisfaction ; b) these meditational paths are moderated by victim gender and relative hierarchical status.

Giorgia Paleari

Assistant Professor.Department of Human and Social Sciences. University of Bergamo. Italy

Maria Brambilla

Assistant Professor. Catholic University of Milan. Milan. Italy

Frank Fincham

Professor.Family Institute, Tallahassee, Florida State University. United States

221/14604 (Un) Forgiveness in romantic relationships experiencing infidelity: Dependency and Negative affect as predictors

Infidelity is one of the principal causes of conjugal conflict and divorce. Two studies provided evidence that sexual infidelity is especially difficult to forgive. Also, results showed that dependency increases negative affect, which in turn decreases forgiveness.

Inmaculada Valor-Segura

Associate Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Spain

Ana Beltrán Morillas

PhD student.Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Spain

Francisca Expósito

Professor.Department of Social Psychology. University of Granada. Spain

221/14605 Forgiving a close other in high risky situations.

This symposium examines the positive and negative consequences of forgiveness, depending on the risky situations in which it occurs. Forgiveness has a protective role in divorce, workplace offences, and infidelity. However, in a domestic violence context, forgiveness has negative consequences

Ximena Arriaga

Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences.Purdue University. West Lafayette, IN, USA

221/188 - New sampling approaches to social cognition

Room: Seminar

The symposium highlights how environmental sampling processes offer novel explanations for social-cognitive phenomena. These phenomena include the in-group heterogeneity effect, illusory correlations, the false consensus effect and the “lure” of small samples.

Chair:

Florian Kutzner

Assistant Professor. Psychologisches Institut. Universität Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany.

221/18801 Selective information sampling and the ingroup heterogeneity effect

Adaptive sampling is defined as a tendency to re-sample what is pleasant and to avoid what is unpleasant. By means of computer simulations we show that this tendency can account for the ingroup heterogeneity effect under realistic assumptions.

Elizaveta Konovalova

Psychologist. Department of Economics and Business. Universitat Pompeu Fabra. Barcelona. Spain

Gael Le Mens

Professor. Department of Economics and Business. Universitat Pompeu Fabra. Barcelona. Spain

221/18802 Illusory correlations caused by adaptive sampling – An empirical test

We empirically test the idea by Denrell and Le Mens (2011) whether a hedonically driven sampling strategy produces illusory correlation. Two unrelated variables will be correlated in the sample if positive outcomes are conditional on the combination of both variables.

Sascha Kuhn

Psychologist. Psychologisches Institut. Universität Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

Florian Kutzner

Assistant Professor. Psychologisches Institut. Universität Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

221/18803 Do small information samples increase likeability? Boundaries of the “less is more”-effect

In the current study we presented samples of attributes of virtual persons to participants and asked them to rate likeability. Our findings help to disentangle the boundary conditions of the divergent results obtained in previous research.

Johannes Prager

Psychologist. Psychologisches Institut. Universität Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

Klaus Fiedler

Professor. Psychologisches Institut. Universität Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

221/18804 Choosing the devil you don’t know: Evidence for limited sensitivity to sample size-based uncertainty

When performance targets must be met, option uncertainty must also be considered to optimize choices. In three experiments we found people to be sensitive to sample size-based uncertainty only when differences in observed performance were negligible.

Florian Kutzner

Assistant Professor. Psychologisches Institut. Universität Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Germany

221/18805 Origins of false consensus effect in win expectations for the U.S. Presidential Election 2016

False consensus in win expectations can be partially explained by people’s reliance on information sampled from their own social circles.

Wändi Bruine de Bruin

Professor. Centre for Decision Research, Leeds University Business School. UK

Mirta Galesic

Professor. Santa Fe Institute. Santa Fe. USA

221/136 - Modern Times: Antecedents and Consequences of Economic Objectification

Room: Andalucía I

Why are factory workers and lower class people often objectified? When does money lead to interpersonal neglect or approach? This symposium provides a comprehensive account of the antecedents and consequences of economic objectification, with research from social and economic psychology.

Chair:

Luca Andrighetto

Associate Professor of Social Psychology. Department of Education Sciences. University of Genova. Italy.

221/13601 Work and Freedom? Working Self-Objectification and Belief in Personal Free Will

Three experiments (N=254) consistently showed that performing a manual (Study 1 and 2) or a computer (Study 3) objectifying task (vs. non-objectifying and vs. baseline condition) increases participants’ self-objectification, and, in turn, decreases their belief in having personal free will.

Cristina Baldissarri

PhD candidate in Social Psychology, Dept of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy

Luca Andrighetto

Associate Professor of Social Psychology, Dept of Education Sciences, University of Genova, Italy

Alessandro Gabbiadini

Post-doctoral Fellowship in Social Psychology, Dept of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy

Chiara Volpato

Full professor in Social Psychology, Dept of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy

221/13602 Motivational effects of money on mind and emotion perception

Whilst the negative impact of money on interpersonal harmony has been well documented, the social cognitive processes that underlie them are relatively unknown. I will show that the motivation for money leads to mind deprivation and further undesirable behaviors.

Xijing Wang

PhD student, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, Faculty of Brain Sciences, University of College London, London, UK

Eva Krumhuber

Lecturer in Exp Psychology, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, Faculty of Brain Sciences, University of College London, London

221/13603 Money and Relationships: When and Why Thinking about Money Leads People to Approach Other

Monetary reminders have been shown to discourage people from affiliating with others. We proposed such an effect can be reversed when others are instrumental to people’s goals. Results from four experiments converged to support our proposition.

Chen  Zhansheng

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, the University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Teng Fei

PhD, School of Psychology,  South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China

Poon Kai-TaK

Department of Psychological Studies and Centre for Psychosocial Health, The Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Zhang Denghao

Department of Psychology, Renmin University of China, Beijing, China.

Jiang Yuwei

Department of Management and Marketing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.

221/13604 Money Cues Increase Agency and Decrease Prosociality Among Children: Early Signs of Market Mode Behaviors

In a series of six studies, money—the market-mode cue—was presented to children ages 3-6. Handling money (compared with other objects) increased laborious effort, behavior consistent with market mode, and reduced helpfulness and generosity, behaviors consistent with communal mode.

Agata Gasiorowska

PhD in Social Psychology, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Faculty of Psychology in Wroclaw, Poland

Lan Nguyen Chaplin

Department of Managerial Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago, US

Tomasz Zaleskiewicz

SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Faculty of Psychology in Wroclaw, Poland

Sandra Wygrab

Sandra Wygrab, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Faculty of Psychology in Wroclaw , Poland

Kathleen D. Vohs

Marketing Department, University of Minnesota, US

221/13605 Supporting Inequality? Dehumanization of Low Socioeconomic Status Groups Contributes to Justify Income Inequality

Differences in humanity between low and middle socioeconomic-status groups explained differences in the perception in the economic administration of both groups. Low socioeconomic-status groups were perceived as animals unable to administrate their economy. Therefore, participants rejected helping them through welfare

Mario Sainz

PhD student, Department of Social Psychology and Methodology of Behavioural Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Rocio Martinez

Department of Social Psychology and Methodology of Behavioural Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Miguel Moya

Full Professor, Dept of Social Psychology and Methodology of Behavioural Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón

Dept of Social Psychology and Methodology of Behavioural Sciences, University of Granada, Granada,

Steve Loughnan

Lecturer, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

14.30 - 16.10 h. Blitz: Presentations VII

Session 13: Consumer behaviour

Room: Albéniz

221/14201 Benchmarking oral approach-avoidance: how little is necessary to evoke in-out effects?

Approach and avoidance tendencies can be induced via the oral system through inward versus outward wandering kinematics during articulation. This effect occurs even when only two single letters are being presented or when stimulus words were presented auditory.

Ira Theresa Maschmann

Department of Psychology, University of Cologne

Lea Boecker

Department of Psychology, University of Cologne

Sascha Topolinski

Department of Psychology, University of Cologne

221/14203 Word articulation effects in person perception: Gains in trustworthiness for sellers with inward directed usernames

Four experiments extend word articulation effects to the person perception and consumer attitudes fields, showing that in the context of online markets the mere use of an inward-directed (vs. outward-directed) username increases perceptions of seller trustworthiness.

Rita Rocha da Silva

Department of Psychology, University of Cologne

221/14204 In and out of economic interactions

We investigate whether pro-social decisions in Trust and Ultimatum Games tend to be more intuitive than self-interested decisions by subtly activating behavioral tendencies as precursors of intuitive responses via the “in-out” effect.

Michael Zürn

Department of Psychology, University of Cologne

221/1514 Regulatory Focus and Endowment Effects: When Promotion Shift Spreads Price Variance.

We zoomed into the relation of regulatory focus and endowment effects. While we used a dynamic manipulation compared to a mere state manipulation, we obtained not only price over-estimations by prevention focus, but also a reinforced willingness to negotiate by promotion shift.

Peter-Samuel Arslan

Psychologist, MSc, Institute of Psychology, Social Cognition Departement, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany

221/1746 €14,875 for your car?! Why Precise Anchors Distinctly Affect Anchor Recipients and Senders

Precise anchors (€14,875)—those featuring fewer trailing zeros—are more potent than round anchors (€15,000). The present studies extend the precision literature by establishing opposing effects for anchor recipients and anchor senders and by contrasting theoretically competing mechanisms.

David Loschelder

Professor. Insitute of Psychology. Leuphana University. Lüneburg. Germany

Malte Friese

Professor. Department of Social Psychology. Saarland University. Saarbrücken. Germany

Roman Trötschel

Professor. Insitute of Psychology. Leuphana University. Lüneburg. Germany

221/1360 What or whom do you see? : Dehumanization and anthropomorphism in advertisement

Building on the anthropomorphism and dehumanization literature, we empirically tested if they can co-occur when a non-human (product/brand) and a human entity (model) are presented together (in an advertisement). Results suggest that objectification of the model obstructs the occurrence of anthropomorphism.

Iskra Herak

PhD Student, Louvain School of Management Research Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain la Neuve, Belgium

221/1103 Oversatiation negatively affects evaluation of goal-relevant (but not goal-irrelevant) advertised brands

This research provides one of the first attempts to explore whether and how over-satiation may affect consumer responses to advertising. We showed that a state of over-satiation negatively affected evaluations and buying intentions of advertised brands of the over-consumed product.

Christophe Vermeulen

PhD Student. Psychological Sciences Research Institute. Center for the Study of Social Behavior. Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (UCL). Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium

Johan Karremans

Associate Professor. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

Mathieu Kacha

Associate Professor. CEREFIGE. University of Lorraine.Metz. France

Jean-Luc Herrmann

Professor. CEREFIGE. University of Lorraine.Metz. France

Olivier Corneille

Professor. Psychological Sciences Research Institute. Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (UCL). Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium

221/1192 The Carnism Inventory - Measuring the Ideology of Eating Animals

The ideology of eating animals have been described as carnism. The present research showed that carnistic beliefs are positively associated with the eating and killing of animals, SDO, RWA and negatively related with attributed mind and moral status of animals.

Tamara Pfeiler

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Department of Personality Psychology and Psychological Assessment. University of Mainz. Germany.

Christopher Monteiro

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Cornell University. Ithaca. US.

221/1210 The influence of cognitive load on taste perception and consumption preferences. Behavioral and neuroimaging findings

With two neuroimaging studies, we demonstrate the concept of hedonic compensation. Under high compared to low cognitive load, participants display reduced responsivity in neural networks processing taste and reward, leading them to taste less but prefer sweeter drinks.

Inga Rösler

PhD Candidate, Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht. Netherlands.

Henk van Steenbergen

Assistant Professor, Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University. Leiden. Netherlands

lotte van dillen

Assistant Professor, Social and Organisational Psychology/ Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University. Leiden. Netherlands

221/1127 Mind your Meat: The Effect of Religious Beliefs on Perceptions of Animals and Meat Eaters

We explored people’s evaluations of sacred animals, and social others who consumed such animals. Whilst sacred animals were granted human minds, religious transgressors were likened to animals, demonstrating the key role of mind perception in explaining religious beliefs regarding animals.

Kunalan Manokara

PhD Candidate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Australia

Eva Krumhuber

Lecturer, Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, United Kindom

Albert Lee

Assistant Professor, Division of Psychology, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

221/1347 If you are a mother with children, you should not incorporate variety in your consumer choices

The results showed that the consumer who incorporate variety - seeking was evaluated as more interesting. However, the female consumer who preferred variety and has family was evaluated as less responsible that single female consumer who preferred variety.

Paulina Śliwińska

Psychologist. PhD Student. Institute of Psychology. Maria Curie-Sklodowska University. Lublin. Poland.

Katarzyna Bochyńska

Psychologist. PhD Student. Institute of Psychology. Maria Curie-Sklodowska University. Lublin. Poland.

Katazaryna Stasiuk

Psychologist. PhD. Institute of Psychology. Maria Curie-Sklodowska University. Lublin. Poland.

Session 14: Social identity

Room: Machado

221/13801 Subgroup Identification, threat and prejudice in complex ethnic relations: Beyond the binary ingroup-outgroup paradigm.

Through a study of Turkish Cypriots and a representative sample survey from both the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot community it is shown that Ingroup Identification predicts more prejudice towards ‘mainland’ outgroups through increased threat from the primary outgroup.

Charis Psaltis

Associate Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Cyprus. Cyprus

Huseyin Cakal

Lecturer in psychology. School of Psychology. Keele University. United Kingdom.

221/13802 Youth social identification and participation in sectarian and civic behaviour in Northern Ireland

In this study we examine social identity amongst youth in Northern Ireland and demonstrate that strong identification is associated with increased civic participation for Catholics (relative to Protestants), and increased sectarian behaviours for Protestants (relative to Catholics).

Shelley McKeown Jones

Lecturer in psychology. Graduate School of Education. University of Bristol. Bristol. United Kingdom.

Laura K. Taylor

Lecturer in psychology. School of Psychology. Queen's University Belfast. Belfast. United Kingdom.

221/13803 Bridging majority and minority perspectives of society – The role of social identity complexity/inclusiveness

On a sample of 767 youth in four Balkan countries, we discovered social identity complexity and inclusiveness predict lower social dominance, more support for affirmative action and lower trust in institutions; they were more predictive for minority’s than majority’s attitudes.

Marija Brankovic

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Singidunum University. Serbia.

Iris Zezelj

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Belgrade. Serbia

Edona Maloku Bërdyna,

Lecturer in psychology. American University. Kosovo

221/13804 Building identity in post-war Kosovo: Superordinate categorization versus identity complexity among Albanians and Serbs

Studies with segregated ethnic groups in Kosovo (NAlbanians=221, NSerbs=110) reveal that superordinate categorization at national level predicts negative intergroup effects for Albanian majority. For Serb minority, it predicts positive ones but is currently low. More complex identities benefit Albanians.

Edona Maloku Bërdyna

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. Netherlands

Belle Derks

Professor of Psychology. Department of social and organisational psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands.

Colette van Laar

Professor of Psychology. Centre for social and cultural psychology. University of Leuven, Belgium

Naomi Ellemers

Professor of Psychology. Department of social and organisational psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands.

221/1241 Rejection Identification Model: The Case of Middle Eastern Refugees in Germany

We conducted a series of 5 studies cross populations (Palestinians, Mexicans, and Syrian refugees). In contrast to RIM Propositions, in contexts of long-standing prejudice against minority groups, social identification didn’t counteract the negative effects of pervasive prejudice on psychological well-being.

Wala' Maaitah

Department of Social Psychology- Friedrich Schiller University- Germany

Nicole Harth

Thomas Kessler

221/14701 Recognition, identity, and attitudes towards participation of minorities in Chilean students

The paper analyzed the relationship among recognition, common identity, and attitudes toward social participation of three minorities in a sample of Chilean pupils. Results showed differences in the forms of recognition, and the presence of moderation for some minorities.

David Sirlopú

Investigador Docente, Facultad de Psycologia, Universidad del Desarrollo, Concepción, Chile

Claudia Paz Pérez-Salas

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Unviersity of Concepción, Concepción. Chile

Verónica Villarroel

Directora del Centro de Investigación y Mejoramiento de la Educación (CIME), Facultad de Psycologia, Universidad del Desarrollo, Concepción, Chile

Catalina García

Doncente, Facultad de Psycologia, Universidad del Desarrollo, Concepción, Chile

José Luis Saiz

Psychologist, Departamento de Psychologia, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile

221/14702 The importance of selecting the best prejudice-reduction strategy: Direct and indirect intergroup contact interventions

We conducted interventions in educational contexts showing that (a) during direct contact, categorization should precede categorization, and (b) outcomes of a direct contact intervention can be spread to a larger number of individuals though vicarious contact techniques.

Loris Vezzali

Department of Education and Human Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

Gian Antonio Di Bernardo

Post-Doc, Department of Psychology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

Miles Hewstone

Professor, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Sofia Stathi

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling, University of Greenwich, Greenwich, UK

Dora Capozza

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy

Elena Trifiletti

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychooogy, University of Verona, Verona, Italy

Dino Giovannini

Professor, Department of Education and Human Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

221/14703 Who is my identity keeper? Negotiating complex identities of youth in ethnically mixed settings

Twenty-five focus groups with majority and minority youth (N=160) in Croatia revealed how youth understood and defined their ethnic identity and in-group belonging in multiethnic context and how they navigate family and school influences in building and maintaining their ethnicity.

Dinka Čorkalo Biruški

Professor, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia

Lana Pehar

PhD student, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia

Margareta Jelić

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia

Tea Pavin Ivanec

Professor, Faculty of Teacher Education, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia

Jasmina Tomašić Humer

Assistant Profressor, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia

221/14704 Does violence beget violence? Family ethnic socialization and youth intergroup bias in Northern Ireland

Analyses found that the link between exposure to sectarian violence and youth participating in such acts in Northern Ireland is mediated by family ethnic socialization and intergroup bias, highlighting the importance of understanding how family processes affect intergroup relations.

Laura K. Taylor

Assistant Professor, School of Psychology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK

Shelley McKeown Jones

Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

221/1339 When identity slows you down: High group identification when you are no longer a member of the group

High group identity has negative and long lasting effects on the individual after the person stops being a member of the group

Roberto Gutierrez

Psychologist. University of Hertfordshire. Hatfield, United Kingdom

Alison Waddie

Pychologist. University of Hertfordshire. Hatfield. United Kingdom

Paul Hutchison

Psychologist. London Metropolitan University. London. United Kingdom

221/1538 When religious orientation moderates the consequences of integration policies on threat and identity processes

Our studies investigate the role of religious orientations facing integration policies (in terms of emotions and identity processes). Furthermore they examine the moderating role of religious orientations on the consequences of integration policies (assimilationism, multiculturalism) on emotions and identity processes.

Nada Negraoui

PhD, PErSEUs, EA 7312, Lorraine University, Metz, France

David Bourguignon

Lecturer, PErSEUs, EA 7312, Lorraine University, Metz, France

Valérie Fointiait

Professor, PErSEUs, EA 7312, Lorraine University, Metz, France

16.10 - 16.40 h. Coffee Break

16.40 - 18.20 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions VIII

221/100 - Recent developments in top-down influences on social categorization processes

Room: Manuel Falla

The four presentations in this symposium demonstrate the role of a range of top-down effects such as expectancies, motivations, prejudice, and prior knowledge in determining early visual processing of cross-race faces and representations of social categories.

Chair:

Kerry Kawakami

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. York University. Toronto. Canada.

221/10001 A dynamic approach to social categorization: Behavioral and neural evidence

A dynamic approach to social categorization will be discussed, which predicts that stereotypes and conceptual knowledge may shape the visual perception of social categories. Evidence for such ‘visual bias’ from behavioral techniques (mouse-tracking), brain-imaging, and computational modeling will be presented.

Jonathan Freeman

Psychologist, New York University, New York, USA

Ryan M. Stolier

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, USA

Kristin Pauker

Psychologist, University of Manoa, Honolulu, USA

Diana T. Sanchez

Psychologist, Rutgers University, Piscataway, USA

221/10002 Same-same but different: The impact of similarity and race on face perception

Three experiments demonstrated a linear trend of interpersonal similarity between the participant and target on face perception, not qualified by target race. We found that as similarity increased, attention to the eyes and recognition of Black and White targets increased.

Kerry Kawakami

Psychologist, York University, Toronto, Canada

Amanda Williams

Psychologist, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom

Justin Friesen

Psychologist, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada

Larissa Vingilis-Jaremko

Psychologist, York University, Toronto, Canada

David Sidhu

Graduate Student, Psychology Department, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada

Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón

Psychologist, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Elena Cañadas

Psychologist, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

221/10003 Economic scarcity alters social perception to promote racial discrimination: Evidence from the brain and behavior

When the economy declines, racial discrimination increases. We found that scarcity alters social perception of Black faces at multiple levels (categorization, representation, and neural encoding) to increase anti-Black discrimination, suggesting new mechanisms through which racial disparities proliferate during economic duress.

Amy Krosch

Psychologist, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA

David M. Amodio

Psychologist, New York University, New York, USA

221/10004 Visualizing the development of social categories

I use a reverse correlation procedure to visualize the development of racial categorization in White American children and adults. Results suggest that children’s perceptions of racial outgroups are infused with negative affect and are highly divergent from those of adults.

Yarrow Dunham

Psychologist, Yale University, New Haven, USA

221/60 - The social psychology of (dis-)belief in science

Room: Machuca

Attitudes towards science appear to be increasingly polarized. This symposium brings together recent research endeavors aimed at understanding how people evaluate science and scientific evidence. Together, the contributions show that science is often misconstrued due to ideological and motivational factors.

Chair:

Bastiaan Rutjens

Assistant professor in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/6001 Exploring the ideological antecedents of science skepticism: Conservatism, morality, and religiosity

Two studies explore the ideological antecedents of science acceptance. Political ideology best predicts skepticism about anthropogenic climate change, while religious belief and moral purity concerns best predict skepticism about vaccines as well as a general disbelief in science.

Bastiaan Rutjens

Assistant professor. Psychology Department. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands

Robbie Sutton

Professor of Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

221/6002 Attitude roots: Understanding and overcoming the motivated rejection of science

We introduce the notion of attitude roots: underlying fears, ideologies, and identity needs that sustain and motivate specific surface attitudes like climate skepticism and creationism. Evidence is drawn from meta-analyses of the predictors of climate skepticism and a 25-nation survey.

Matthew J. Hornsey

Professor. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

Kelly S Fielding

Associate professor. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/6003 Explaining moralized opposition to genetically modified food in the U.S. and Europe

In representative surveys, opposition to GM food is more moralized in Europe than in the U.S. Religiosity is a stronger predictor of opposition in the US. Connectedness to nature predicts opposition equally across countries, and connectedness is higher in Europe.

Sydney E. Scott

Doctoral student. Psychology department. University of Pennsylvania. Philadelpha. USA.

Yoel Inbar

Associate professor. Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Toronto. Canada

Paul Rozin

Professor. Psychology department. University of Pennsylvania. Philadelpha. USA.

221/6004 Is DNA Destiny? How Essences Distort how we Think about the Genes

Genetic essentialism is the tendency for people to think of genes as similar to essences. This bias distorts how people understand the science of genes, and has broad implications that extend to how they think about sex, race, and crime.

Steven Heine

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver, Canada

221/6005 Belief in scientific-technological progress and life satisfaction: the role of personal control

Belief in scientific-technological progress is a stronger predictor of life satisfaction than religious beliefs across 69 out of 72 countries. The effect is mediated by personal control and is stronger when it is widely held within a specific culture.

Olga Stavrova

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Tilburg University. Tilburg. The Netherlands

Daniel Ehlebracht

Junior professor. Institut für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie (ISS). University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Detlef Fetchenhauer

Professor. Institut für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie (ISS). University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/221 - The Danger of Glorifying the Ingroup: Implications for Intragroup Behavior and Intergroup Relations

Room: Picasso

This symposium explores the effects of glorification (versus attachment) on a variety of group-based attitudes and behaviors in both intra- and intergroup contexts. We demonstrate that glorification discourages constructive, ingroup-critical behavior and exacerbates conflicts with outgroups.

Chair:

Mengyao Li

PhD candidate. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. University of Massachusetts Amherst. Amherst. USA.

221/22101 The Differential Effect of Identification Modes on Voice Behavior in Organization

In a longitudinal research we studied the differential effects of glorification and attachment to the university on voice behavior of university professors. We hypothesized and found that attachment positively predicts whereas glorification negatively predicts engagement in voice behavior.

Sonia Roccas

Professor. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel.

Andrey Elster

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Jerusalem. Israel.

Lilach Sagiv

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Jerusalem. Israel.

221/22102 The relationship between ingroup glorification and victim beliefs in predicting intergroup attitudes and conflict opinions

Across three studies in the context of the conflicts in Cyprus, Northern Ireland, and Israel-Palestine, we examine the role of ingroup glorification and different victim beliefs in predicting conflict attitudes, as well as the relationship between these two constructs.

Johanna Vollhardt

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Clark University. Worcester. USA.

Michelle Twali

Department of Psychology. Clark University. Worcester. USA.

Christopher Cohrs

Professor of Psychology. Jacobs University Bremen. Bremen. Germany.

Andrew McNeill

Northumbria University. Newcastle upon Tyne. UK.

Eliana Hadjiandreou

Department of Psychology. Clark University. Worcester. USA.

221/22103 “A Very Moral Group”, towards Whom? Group Glorification and Responses to Aggression Against Civilians

Group glorification was associated with moral asymmetry – judging and punishing ingroup transgressions against the outgroup less severely than identical transgressions by outgroup members against ingroup members. This effect was mediated by biased interpretation and recollection of the information provided.

Noa Schori Eyal

Post-doctoral Researcher. The IDC School of Psychology. Interdisciplinary Center (IDC). Herzliya. Israel.

Yechiel Klar

Professor. The School of Psychological Sciences. Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv. Israel.

221/22104 Stepping Into Perpetrators’ Shoes: Glorification Motivates Perspective-taking with Ingroup Perpetrators and the Implications for Justice

In the context of intergroup conflict, three experiments showed that when faced with the ingroup’s moral transgressions, ingroup glorification motivated perspective-taking with the perpetrators. Importantly, such perspective-taking can serve a morally disengaging function, leading to reduced support for justice.

Mengyao Li

PPsychologist. University of Massachusetts Amherst/ Max-Planck-Institute for Research on Collective Goods. USA.

Bernhard Leidner

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. University of Massachusetts Amherst. Amherst. USA.

Silvia Fernandez-Campos

The New School for Social Research. New York City. USA.

221/47 - How subtle social psychological mechanisms reinforce traditional gender roles and inequality

Room: Dinner 1

Using various methodologies and examining diverse populations and outcomes (e.g., endorsement of prescriptive beauty norms, help seeking/offering behavior, cognitive performance, and self-objectification/self-sexualization), this symposium presents empirical research that demonstrates how subtle social psychological mechanisms reinforce the traditional gender roles.

Chair:

Nurit Shnabel

The School of Psychological Sciences. Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv. Israel.

221/4701 The beauty myth: Prescriptive norms that women should strive for beauty reflect oppressive motivations

This research, consisted of four studies, demonstrates how appearance demands for women increase when traditional gender roles and male dominance are threatened. These findings support feminist theorizing that oppressive motives generate social pressure on women to invest heavily in appearance.

Nurit Shnabel

The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Leeat Ramati-Tzibar

The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Peter Glick

Department of Psychology, Lawrence University. Appleton, Wisconsin, USA.

221/4705 The effects of appearance compliments on women's and men's affect and cognitive performance

Two experiments examined the influence of receiving appearance compliments. While the effects on mood were mostly positive, such compliments consistently impaired cognitive performance. These findings suggest that even seemingly positive forms of objectification can have detrimental consequences, especially for women.

Rotem Kahalon

School of Psychological Sciences. Tel-Aviv University, Israel.

Nurit Shnabel

School of Psychological Sciences. Tel-Aviv University, Israel

221/4702 Benevolent sexism encourages dependency-oriented cross-gender helping relations

Four experiments demonstrated that benevolent sexism encourages men to offer women dependency-oriented help (i.e., direct assistance, rather than autonomy-oriented help), and women—to seek dependency-oriented help from men. As such, benevolent sexism promotes behaviors that perpetuate the traditional gender roles.

Orly Bareket

The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Nurit Shnabel

The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Yoav Bar-Anan

Psychology Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Anna Kende

Department of Social Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest, Hungary.

Yael Lazar

Department of Social Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest, Hungary.

221/4703 Do sexism and sensitivity to inequality explain cultural differences in self-objectification?

South-East Asian (Thai) women experience more body shame, but less body surveillance and self-sexualization, than Western and Russian women. This is explained by differences in benevolent sexism (higher in Thailand) and vertical individualism (lower in Thailand) respectively.

Robin Wollast

Unité de Psychologie Sociale, Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels, Belgium.

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

Philippe Bernard

Unité de Psychologie Sociale, Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels, Belgium.

221/4704 Subtle social psychological mechanisms that reinforce traditional gender roles: Theoretical implications and practical applications

Discussant

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

221/106 - The social psychology of punishing “innocent” targets: Recent research on collective/vicarious/displaced punishment

Room: Dinner 2

Five talks will address the question when and why observers, victims or their fellow group members (i.e., vicarious punishment) lash out against entire groups (i.e., collective punishment) or individuals who were personally uninvolved in an original offense (i.e., displaced punishment).

Chair:

Mario Gollwitzer

Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

221/10601 Morals, black sheep, and their victims: What triggers harsh punishment of unfair behavior?

Does punishment aim at protecting ingroup norms or victims? Four studies orthogonally crossed fairness, perpetrator, and victim group membership. Unfair behavior consistently triggered punishment. The influence of perpetrator and victim group membership differed according to study setting and intergroup relation.

Stefanie Hechler

PhD student in Psychology. Department of Psychology. Friedrich Schiller University of Jena. Jena. Germany.

Thomas Kessler

Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. Friedrich Schiller University of Jena. Jena. Germany.

221/10602 Characters of the ingroup that cause the members to retaliate vicariously

In two studies, I examined the effects of fairness on vicarious retaliation in intergroup conflict. Results indicated that group membership is not enough for vicarious retaliation; it might depend on the psychological reward offered to ingroup members by social fairness.

Tomohiro Kumagai

Professor of Psychology. Department of Communication and Culture. Otsuma Women’s University. Tokyo. Japan.

221/10603 Displaced revenge aims at sending a message to the original perpetrator

In three studies, we examined the effect of entitativity on displaced revenge tendencies. Our findings suggest that sending a message to the original perpetrator is an important aspect of the psychological dynamics underlying displaced revenge.

Mario Gollwitzer

Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

Arne Sjöström

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

Zoe Magraw-Mickelson

PhD student in Psychology. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

221/10604 Collective punishment as a function of entitativity and punishment goals

Group entitativity increases support for third-party collective punishment because members of highly entitative groups are perceived as more similar and interchangeable. These perceptions in turn increase the perceived likelihood of the effectiveness of collective punishments at deterring future wrongdoings.

Andrea Pereira

Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA.

Jan-Willem van Prooijen

Professor of Psychology. Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology. VU University. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/10605 When justice needs to be done, collective apologies only reduce collective punishment of valued groups

We investigated collective apologies effects on one's support for collective punishment. Two studies suggest collective apologies help a group of innocent people dissociate from the offenders (and avoid punishment) when justice must be done and the group is morally valued.

Jacques Berent

Research Assistant. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.

Juan M Falomir Pichastor

Professor of Psychology. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.

221/162 - The moral lives of others: Person perception in moral judgment

Room: Andalucía III

Moral judgments center around judgments of persons: people oftentimes ask not “is this action wrong?”, but rather “is this person good or bad?” In this symposium we demonstrate how a person-centered approach has yielded new insight into the moral mind.

Chair:

Paul Conway

Florida State University. USA.

221/16201 Person Centered Morality

We are fundamentally motivated to understand the character of others. Features of an act that signal virtues or vices can carry more weight in moral judgment than the consequences of the act, or whether a moral rule has been broken.

Eric Luis Uhlmann

INSEAD Business School

Luke (Lei) Zhu

University of Manitoba

David Tannenbaum

University of Utah

221/16202 Inference of Trust from Intuitive Moral Judgments

We provide empirical support for a partner choice account of moral intuitions whereby typically deontological judgments confer an adaptive function by increasing a person’s likelihood of being chosen as a cooperation partner.

Jim A.C. Everett

University of Oxford

David Pizarro

Cornell University

Molly Crockett

University of Oxford

221/16203 Asymmetrical Conformity effects in moral cognition

People conform more with deontological than consequentialist others. We argue this asymmetrical conformity suggests that people intuitively refrain from making utilitarian judgments as these might arouse moral suspicion in others.

Dries H. Bostyn

Ghent University

Arne Roets

Ghent University

221/16204 The Social Implications of Dilemma Judgments

Rather than examining the processes driving judgments when causing harm maximizes outcomes, this work examines the social implications of such judgments: People intuit the dual-process model, strategically alter judgments to impress others, and asymmetrically express outrage regarding others’ judgments

Paul Conway

Florida State University

221/159 - Not just a numbers game: How offer presentation and supplemental rationales influence negotiations

Room: Andalucía II

In addition to what you offer, how you make the offer plays a decisive role for negotiation success. In five talks, this symposium showcases the latest research on how offer presentation affects both interpersonal relations and settlement terms in negotiations.

Chair:

Alice Lee

Columbia Business School. USA.

221/15901 Limits versus Critiques: Divergent effects of constraint and disparagement rationales in negotiations

Across four studies, constraint rationales (referring to limits) fared better than disparagement rationales (offering critiques) and control conditions in terms of settlements and impressions. Results also highlight a mediator (assumed reservation price) and a boundary (seller’s attachment to the object).

Alice Lee

Columbia Business School

Daniel Ames

Columbia Business School

221/15902 The Motivated-Adjustment Model of Anchoring: How the Framing of Anchors Matter in Negotiations

The current research tested a Motivated-Adjustment Model of Anchoring (MAMA) that combines framing and anchoring to elucidate how concession aversion moderates anchoring in negotiations. The results highlight the key role that motivational processes play in mixed-motive decision-making.

Johann Majer

Leuphana University

David Loschelder

Leuphana University

Adam Galinsky

Columbia Business School

Roman Trötschel

Leuphana University

221/15903 Concession Request Frames in Negotiations

Three studies examined the effects of framing concession requests that emphasize requestor-benefit versus conceder-cost. Findings show that requests around conceder-cost elicit more compliance and achieve better economic outcomes for requestors but leave negotiation counterparts less satisfied than requests emphasizing requestor-benefit.

Nazli Bhatia

CATÓLICA-LISBON School of Business & Economics

Rosalind Chow

Carnegie Mellon University

221/15905 Discussion: How you present an offer is equally as important as what you offer.

The final discussion will integrate the findings from the four talks and highlight how each introduces and empirically tests key social psychological processes that shape negotiation outcomes and interpersonal perceptions at the bargaining table.

David Loschelder

Leuphana University Lüneburg

221/140 - When the online and offline worlds collide: Exploring how digital technology affects collective action

Room: Seminar

In this digital age, people have opportunities to engage with the social world in new and different ways. This symposium presents a timely opportunity to unpack the relationships between technology and psychology, engagement and slacktivism, online and offline mobilization.

Chair:

Laura Smith

Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Bath. Bath. United Kingdom.

221/14001 After Aylan Kurdi: Online discussions about threat and harm increase solidarity with refugees over time

We investigate the enduring psychological impact of images of Aylan Kurdi, a Syrian child refugee, on solidarity with refugees. We find that an increase in solidarity can occur to the extent that online discussions were about mortality, harm, and threat.

Laura Smith

Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Bath. Bath. UK.

Emma Thomas

School of Psychology. Flinders University. Adelaide. Australia.

Craig McGarty

Professor of Social and Political Psychology. School of Social Sciences and Psychology. University of Western Sydney. Sydney. Australia.

221/14002 Reconsidering slacktivism: online collective action, perceived efficacy and activism experience combine to affect further participation

In response to the slacktivism debate, an experiment examined whether online collective action facilitates or inhibits future engagement, measured at two time points. Results demonstrate both a facilitation and inhibition effect, dependent on time, participants’ efficacy perceptions and prior activism.

Denise Wilkins

PhD Candidate in Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK.

Andrew Livingstone

Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK.

Mark Levine

Professor of Social Psychology, University of Exeter. UK

221/14003 Activists’ Radicalization in the Context of Ingroup and Outgroup Visibility in Social Media and Offline

We conducted two experiments to test whether offline and online, ingroup and outgroup identifiability influence activists’ radical intentions. Our findings suggest that radicalization is affected by the site of discussion only in the presence of high perceived outgroup punishability.

Anna Kende

Social Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

Sandy Schumann

Wiener-Anspach Post-doctoral Fellow. Centre for the Study of Intergroup Conflict. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK.

Russell Spears

Professor of Social Psychology. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands.

221/14004 Discussant

Russell Spears

Professor of Social Psychology. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands.

221/62 - Peer Influences on the Development of Aggressive Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence: Longitudinal Analyses

Room: Andalucía I

"The present symposium presents longitudinal and multi-level analyses examining the role of peer problems and peer socialization on the development of aggression in childhood and adolescence. All presentations are based on large data sets each including more than 1,000 participants. "

Chair:

Janis Jung

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Universitiy of Potsdam. Potsdam. Germany.

221/6201 The Socializing Effect of Classroom Aggression on the Development of Aggression and Social Rejection

The present study examined the moderating effect of classroom aggression on the development of individual aggression over time and on the path from individual aggression to social rejection in a sample of 1,284 elementary school children.

Helena Rohlf

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Barbara Krahé

Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Robert Busching

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

221/6202 Physical attractiveness, peer problems, and aggressive behavior in middle childhood: A 3-year longitudinal study

The link between low physical attractiveness and aggressive behavior, mediated by higher peer problems, is examined in a 3-year longitudinal study of 1,043 children. Results revealed a small but significant indirect effect.

Fabian Kirsch

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Barbara Krahé

Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Robert Busching

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

221/6203 External control beliefs as mediator in the link between peers’ acceptance of aggression and aggression

This longitudinal study examined external control beliefs as mediator in the link between peers’ acceptance of aggression and the development of aggressive behavior in a sample of N = 1,466 male and female participants aged between 10 and 18 years.

Janis Jung

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Barbara Krahé

Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Robert Busching

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

221/6204 The Contagious Effect of Deviant Behavior in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Multi-Level Study

This study investigated the influence of the consistency of deviant behavior in the peer group on the development of individual deviant behavior in a sample of 16,891 adolescents assessed at two data waves one year separated.

Robert Busching

Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Barbara Krahé

Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

16.40 - 18.20 h. Blitz: Presentations VIII

Session 15: Ideologies, values, societal attitudes and political responses

Room: Albéniz

221/1697 Right-wing authoritarianism, societal threat to safety, and strategies of exposure to information

In a quasi-experimental vignette study, authoritarians were less inclined to read general information and more inclined to read threatening information than non-authoritarians were, independently from the presence of societal threat. Exposure to threatening information, combined with societal threat, reinforced RWA.

Silvia Russo

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Örebro University. Örebro. Sweden.

Michele Roccato

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Torino. Torino. Italy

221/1191 Right-Wing Authoritarianism is negatively associated with counter-conditioning

Little empirical evidence exists regarding the link between Right Wing Authoritarianism and attitude change - as a result of the exposition of counter attitudinal information. We conducted three studies using an evaluative counter-conditioning procedure in order to address this question.

Amélie Bret

PhD Student. LPNC, University Grenoble Alpes and IPSY, Université Catholique de Louvain

Adrien Mierop

PhD Student, IPSY, Université Catholique de Louvain

Martial Mermillod

Prof. LPNC, University Grenoble Alpes

Olivier Corneille

Prof. IPSY, Université Catholique de Louvain

221/1579 Are Liberals and Conservatives Equally Motivated to Feel Empathy toward Others?

Across three cultural contexts, liberals and conservatives wanted to feel less empathy toward members of the opposing political group, compared to their own or a neutral group. Nonetheless, on average, liberals were more motivated than conservatives to experience empathy toward others.

Yossi Hasson

Psychology. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and The Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya. Israel

Maya Tamir

Psychology. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Israel.

Kea Brahms

Psychology. Jacobs University, Bremen. Germany

Christopher Cohrs

Psychology. Jacobs University, Bremen. Germany

Eran Halperin

Psychology. The Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya. Israel.

221/1463 Victims, Vignettes and Video Tapes: A Meta-Analysis of Experimental Research on Victim Derogation from Lerner & Simmons (1966) to Present

Contemporary research on victim derogation has borne mixed results. A meta-analysis (K = 55) of experimental research from Lerner and Simmons onwards revealed a small derogation effect, and studies using more emotionally impactful stimuli (e.g., Lerner & Simmons paradigm) produced larger effects than those using less impactful stimuli (e.g., vignettes).

Rael Dawtry

Post-doctoral Researcher. Department of Psychology. University of Essex. Colchester. UK.

Mitchell Callan

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Essex. Colchester. UK.

Annelie J. Harvey

Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Anglia Ruskin University. Cambridge. UK.

James M. Olson

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Western Ontario. London. Canada.

221/1725 The moderating role of ideologies on the perceptions of economic inequality: A multilevel approach

We examined the moderating role of ideologies on the relationship between the degree of perceived and desired economic inequality, using a multilevel analysis with 41 countries. Results showed such relationship was positive/stronger among people who endorse more meritocracy beliefs.

Efraín Garcia-Sanchez

Psychologist, PhD Candidate, Mind, Brain and Behaviour Research Center at the University of Granada, Spain

Jojanneke Van der Toorn

Psychologist, Assistant Professor, Social and Behavioural Sciences, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón

Psychologist, Associate Professor, Department of Social Psychology at the Mind, Brain and Behaviour Research Center, University of Granada, Spain.

Guillermo B. Willis

Psychloist. Assistant Professor, Department of Social Psychology at the Mind, Brain and Behaviour Research Center, University of Granada, Spain

221/1827 Social justice, legitimacy and social change: on the interaction between distributive and procedural justice

When does perceived social injustice promote egalitarian preferences and dispositions towards social change? We show that perceiving distributive injustice is particularly relevant in predicting egalitarian preferences and dispositions to social change when procedural injustice is also perceived to be high.

Cristobal Moya

Sociologist, Lecturer, School of Sociology, Universidad Diego Portales

Monica Gerber

PhD in Social Research Methods, Associate Professor, School of Sociology, Universidad Diego Portales

221/1373 Failing promises of the social order and the rise of fascist beliefs

In crisis, two survey studies in Greece show that failing promises of the social order correlated positively with conservative beliefs and tolerance of violence. F-beliefs relate positively with system justification and violence towards weaker groups and negatively with activist violence.

Xenia Chryssochoou

PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY, DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY, PANTEION UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCES, ATHENS, GREECE

221/1880 Perceived social norms and the transition from minority to mainstream of far-right movements

This study investigates the processes enabling political minorities to develop into the mainstream by examining the role of perceived social norms (PSN) in context of presidential election. The results support the view that the shaping of PSN in times of collective uncertainty is critical to weaken public opposition to far-right movements.

Isabelle Portelinha

Department of Social Science, Raritan Valley CC, Somerville, NJ, USA

Guy Elcheroth

University of Lausanne, Institut des Sciences Sociales, Lausanne, Switzerland

221/1550 Meaning-Making in the Shadow of Terrorism: The Case of the Charlie Hebdo Attack in Paris

This research investigates French citizens’ symbolic responses to January 7, 2015 Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack in Paris. Searching for and finding meaning were examined using the social stage model of collective coping with disasters. Results showed participants’ responses temporal evolution.

Petra Pelletier

Paris Descartes University

221/1488 Reducing dehumanisation towards extremely negative outgroups: The role of human meaning and multiple categorisation.

Two studies tested whether multiple categorisation and salience of human identity reduce dehumanisation towards extremely negative outgroups. Results showed the relevant role of salience of a specific image of humanity and the accesibility of multiple versus simple categorisation.

Naira Delgado

Assistant Professor. University of La Laguna. Spain.

Paula Hernández-Reyes

PhD Student. University of La Laguna. Spain.

Laura Rodríguez-Gómez

PhD Student. University of La Laguna. Spain.

Ramón Rodríguez-Torres

Full Professor. University of La Laguna. Spain.

221/1893 Are income inequality and climate change competing or complementary issues?: Evidence from national-level surveys

Two national-level U.S. surveys (N=2256) find that salient economic inequality enhances rather than impedes climate change concerns, suggesting equity concerns underpinning these issues may be complementary rather than competitive in the sphere of public opinion.

Adam Pearson

Psychologist. Department of Psychology, Pomona College, and Division of Behavioral and Organizational Science, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA, USA.

Jonathon Schuldt

Social Psychologist. Department of Communication. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Julie Davydova

Research scientist. Department of Communication. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Rainer Romero-Canyas

Senior Behavioral Scientist and Social Psychologist. Environmental Defense Fund. New York, NY. Adjunct Research Scientist, Columbia University. New York, NY.

Dylan Larson-Konar

Research Scientist. Environmental Defense Fund, New York, NY.

221/1531 A worldwide Zeitgeist of decline? The psychometrics of collective societal discontent across 28 countries

At present, many countries suffer from collective societal discontent. We developed an international Zeitgeist-measure to study this. Measurement invariance analyses showed our scale was reliable in 28 countries. We also examined relationships between Zeitgeist, inequality and (economic) quality of life.

Anne Marthe van der Bles

Psychologist. University of Groningen. Groningen. the Netherlands.

Tom Postmes

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. the Netherlands.

Rob R. Meijer

Psychometrician. Department of Psychometrics and Statistics. University of Groningen. Groningen. the Netherlands.

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

221/1707 Community Collectivism: How Fundamental Cultural Values Explain Societal Attitudes

In this talk we present a new conceptualization of culture, the Community Collectivism Scale, and discuss its ability to predict a wide range of outcomes, from individual attitudes (e.g., towards healthcare) to intergroup perceptions (sexism, authoritarianism) and behavior (e.g.,voting behavior).

Birol Akkus

HENGELO OV

Katherine Stroebe

Social Psychologist. Associate Professor. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands

Tom Postmes

Social Psychologist. Full Professor. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands

Session 16 (Part I): Evaluative conditioning and attitude formation

Room: Machado

221/1005 Are Neutral or Ambiguous Targets More Vulnerable to Misattribution Than Valenced Targets?

What targets of judgment are the most susceptible to priming? Contrary to the predominant assumption, two experiments (Total N: 1,565) found that, in the Affect Misattribution Procedure, valenced targets are as susceptible to priming as ambiguous and neutral targets.

Yael Ecker

Graduate student in Psychology. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Beer-Sheva. Israel.

Tal Moran

PhD candidate in Psychology. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Beer-Sheva. Israel.

Yoav Bar-Anan

Psychologist. Doctor. Ben-Gurion University in the Negev. Beer-Sheva. Israel.

221/1745 The Influence of Misinformation Manipulations on Evaluative Conditioning

Previous studies suggest that evaluative conditioning (EC) is mediated by explicit memory. It might therefore be susceptible to manipulations known to influence memory. We tested and show that EC is susceptible to a misinformation manipulation regarding the previous stimulus pairings.

Taylor Benedict

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Department of Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Anne Gast

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Department of Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/1387 Distributed practice can boost evaluative conditioning by increasing memory for the stimulus pairs

Evaluative conditioning describes a change in liking of a stimulus by repeatedly pairing this stimulus with a positive or negative stimulus. We show that this effect can be increased by distributed compared to contiguous repetitions of the pairings.

Jasmin Richter

Psychologist. PhD Student. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Department of Psychology. Faculty of Human Sciences. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

Anne Gast

Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Department of Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/1847 The effect of brightness on person perception

With two studies we test the effect of picture brightness on the perception of others. Our data show that the associations between the relative differences between brightness and darkness and the conceptual differences between calmness and aggression, spill over to perception of others.

Anne Schietecat

PhD candidate. Eindhoven University of Technology, Human Technology Interaction department

Daniel Lakens

Assistant Professor. Eindhoven University of Technology. Human Technology Interaction Department.

Yvonne de Kort

Professor. Eindhoven University of Technology. Human Technology Interaction Department

221/1239 Facing One's Implicit Bias: Prediction of IAT Scores, but not IAT Completion, Leads to Acknowledgment of Intergroup Bias

Implicit bias testing has become widely publicly available and popular. Three studies show that predicting IAT scores, but not IAT completion alone, can lead to acknowledgement of more bias against minorities through adaptation of explicit evaluations to implicit evaluations.

Adam Hahn

Assistant Professor, Social and Economic Cognition I, Social Cognition Center Cologne, Department of Psychology, University of Cologne, Germany

221/1877 Self-construct and affects moderate congruity effect: the influence of higher order variables on evaluative priming

Much research challenge the automaticity of evaluative priming (EP). We suggest higher order variables moderate EP effects. In Experiment 1, an interdependent-self produced a congruity effect, whereas an independent-self eliminated it. In Experiment 2, we replicated and extended these findings.

Aurore Lemonnier

PhD Student. Social Psychology Laboratory. Institute of Psychology. University Paris Descartes. Boulogne-Billancourt. France.

Theodore Alexopoulos

Assistant Professor. Social Psychology Laboratory. Institute of Psychology. University Paris Descartes. Boulogne-Billancourt. France.

Rasyid Bo SANITIOSO

Professor. Social Psychology Laboratory. Institute of Psychology. University Paris Descartes. Boulogne-Billancourt. France.

Session 16 (Part II): Face processing

Room: Machado

221/1230 Manipulated valence moderates the happy face advantage

After manipulating the valence of male Caucasian faces, a happy face advantage emerged in emotion categorization for positively, but not for negatively valenced faces. This supports the evaluative congruence account of the effects of social category cues on emotion categorization.

Sofie Lindeberg

PhD student. School of Psychology and Speech Pathology. Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin University. Perth. Australia.

Ottmar Lipp

Professor. School of Psychology and Speech Pathology. Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin University. Perth. Australia.

221/19001 The impact of high versus low-level processing on facial emotion categorisation in infants and adults

Adults categorise facial expressions of anger and disgust with high-level processing such as language, but rely on low-level processing such as visual differences when high-level processing is unavailable. Infants can also discriminate anger and disgust, using low-level visual discrimination.

Lasana Harris

Senior Lecturer. Department of Experimental Psychology. University College London. London. United Kingdom.

Makeba Wilbourn

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. Duke University. Durham, NC. United States of America.

Ashley Ruba

Graduate student. Department of Psychology. University of Washington. Seattle, WA. United States of America.

Kristin Johnson

Graduate student. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. Duke University. Durham, NC. United States of America.

221/19002 Configural face processing shapes the extent to which emotions influence mind attribution

The present research examined whether configural processes modulate the extent to which facial emotions shape perceived agency and moral ability. Furthermore, we investigated whether facial motion provides configural information that can overcome classic face inversion effects.

Eva Krumhuber

Lecturer. Department of Experimental Psychology. University College London. London. United Kingdom.

Matilda Uusitalo Hultgren

Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University College London. London. United Kingdom.

Yukun Lai

Senior Lecturer. School of Computer Science and Informatics. Cardiff University. Cardiff. United Kingdom.

Paul Rosin

Professor. School of Computer Science and Informatics. Cardiff University. Cardiff. United Kingdom.

221/19003 Social categorisation as a function of feature-specific attention allocation.

Feature-specific attention allocation impacts (a) automatic attitude activation, (b) the generalisation of newly acquired attitudes, and (c) amplitude variations of the P3a (an ERP marker of attention orienting) evoked by (unexpected) emotional and age-related facial features.

Adriaan Spruyt

Ghent University, Belgium

221/19004 How moral integrity shapes processing of facial expressions of emotion

The present research demonstrates how moral integrity threats and affirmations shape the social perception of emotion, and how this varies with individual differences in social anxiety, pointing to the importance of the social context when considering affective processing biases.

lotte van dillen

Associate Professor. Department of Social and Organisational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands.

Wilco van Dijk

Professor. Department of Social and Organisational Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. The Netherlands.

Mark van Rotteveel

Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Dorien Enter

Psychologist. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

18.20 - 19.30 h. Round Table Discussion: Social Psychologists at risk

Room: Manuel Falla

18.20 - 19.30 h. Poster: Session 2

Room: Hall

Social Cognition

221/1051 the mediating role of depression and anxiety on relation between seasonality and subjective well - being

In this study, differences in seasonality, subjective well-being, depression and anxiety of university students as a gender, relation between of seasonality and subjective well-being and and mediator role of depression in this relation we examined.

Elvan Kiremitci

Psychologist. Research Assistant. Abant Izzet Baysal University.Bolu. Turkey

Hamit COSKUN

Psychologist. Professor. Abant Izzet baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

221/1288 What makes a face appear (un)trustworthy? Creating an untrustworthiness-trustworthiness dimension using reverse correlation.

This study replicates earlier findings on facial trustworthiness, extends these findings to gender-neutral faces, a larger variety in judges, and an adjusted reverse correlation methodology, and provides researchers with a useful criterion trustworthiness dimension to compare their own data to.

Lin Jansen

PhD Student. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

Ron Dotsch

Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Daniël Wigboldus

Professor. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

221/1313 Retraining associations: An intervention to protect relatively corpulent women’s body satisfaction from thin ideal exposure

Retraining associations between thinness and beauty was examined as a way to protect body satisfaction from thin ideal exposure. Reinforcing large-beautiful associations was found to suppress the decrease in body satisfaction following thin ideal exposure observed among high-BMI women.

Leila Selimbegovic

Associate professor, Department of Psychology, School of Arts and Humanities, Université de Poitiers, France

Julie Collange

Associate professor, Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Université Paris Descartes, France

Yvana Bocage-Barthelemy

Phd candidate, Department of Psychology, School of Arts and Humanities, Université de Poitiers, France

Armand Chatard

Professor, Department of Psychology, School of Arts and Humanities, Université de Poitiers, France

221/1322 It’s not just a game! The effect of sexually objectifying video games on Player’s objectification

In two studies, we investigated whether identifying with a videogame character who objectifies women increases associations between women and objects and whether this association lead to women’s objectification. Results partially supported our prediction.

Elisa Sarda

Psychologist.Ph.D.Université Grenoble Alpes. Grenoble. France

Laurent Bègue

University Grenoble Alpes

Clémentine Bry

University Savoie Mont Blanc, France

Philippe Bernard

Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium

Olivier Klein

Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

221/1329 Social stereotyping: contrasting facilitation versus inhibition hypothesis.

In this paper, we approach the effects of presence of others in stereotyping. Our experiment contrasts Castelli and Tomelleri (2008) and Lambert et al. (2003) opposite results. Our procedure turned the experimental setting of these two experiments more similar by manipulating the presence of others as co-action vs isolation. Results did not fully replicate the two original experiments and performance on the two tasks were shown to be one of the sources of differences between the two studies

Pedro Figueira

Phd Student. William James Research Center. ISPA-IU. Lisbon. Portugal.

Teresa Garcia-Marques

Psychologist Professor, Social and Organization Psychology Department, ISPA- Instituto Universitário, Lisboa, Portugal

221/1349 Width or Weight? Facial Adiposity Accounts for Width-to-Height Ratio’s Association with Trustworthiness but not Aggression

Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) has been associated both with trustworthiness and aggressiveness judgments. However, we found that when its close correlate facial adiposity (perceived weight) was controlled, fWHR no longer predicted trustworthiness, but still predicted aggressiveness.

Erdem Ozan Meral

MA Student. Department of Psychology. Bogazici University. Istanbul. Turkey

Ceren Su Abacioglu

PhD Candidate. Child Development and Education. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Gul Gunaydin

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Bilkent University. Ankara. Turkey

Emre Selcuk

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Middle East Technical University. Ankara. Turkey

221/1361 The Use of Transitive Verbs Elicits the Perception of Blame and Social Power

A series of experiments revealed that interrogations using transitive rather than intransitive verbs led to enhanced perception of blame as well as stronger social power on the side of the interrogator. Implications for forensic and education contexts are discussed.

Minoru Karasawa

Professor, Dept. of Psychology, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

Sayaka Suga

Assistant Professor, Division of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Aichi Gakuin University, Nisshin, Japan

Ami Sato

Graduate Student, Dept. of Psychology, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

221/1394 The face value. Morality and competence perceived from faces produce gender discrimination in hiring decisions.

The study investigates whether competence and morality perceived from faces affect the evaluation of male and female candidates for a job position. Findings show that women are judged both for their competence and morality, whereas men for their competence only.

Sara Pireddu

PhD Student. Department of Psychology. Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna. Bologna. Italy.

Michela Menegatti

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Almater Mater Studiorum University of Bologna. Bologna. Italy.

Silvia Moscatelli

Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Almater Mater Studiorum University of Bologna. Bologna. Italy.

221/1400 Can smartphone use influence our decision- making process?

This research aims to explore whether different technological devices can impact on judgment and decision making processes. A series of studies indicates that use of smartphones enhances more intuitive and heuristic judgments as compared with using PCs or laptops.

Shir Etgar

Social psychologist. Doctor. The Research Center for Internet Psychology, Sammy Ofer School of Communication, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya DO

Yair Amichai-Hamburger

social psychologist. Professor. The Research Center for Internet Psychology, Sammy Ofer School of Communication, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya

221/1406 Dynamical representation of dominance relationships in the human rostromedial prefrontal cortex

BOLD activity in the rmPFC represents social dominance relationships as learnt from competitive interactions, while the vmPFC and the ventral striatum encode social victories and defeats, respectively. Electrical stimulation of the rmPFC modulates learning and updating of social dominance representations.

Jean-Claude Dreher

Research director, CNRS, Institut des Sciences Cognitives, Lyon, France

Romain Ligneul

Post-doc, Donders Institute

Ignacio Obeso

Centro Integral en Neurociencias A.C. (CINAC), HM Hospitales- Puerta del Sur and CEU-San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain

Chrisitan Ruff

Professor, Laboratory for Social and Neural Systems Research (SNS-Lab), Department of Economics, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

221/1432 Exploring the structure of morality with a new moral image database

We present a moral image database comprising 2,900 images normed by over 2,600 participants. A subset of these images was normed on Haidt’s moral foundations and Janoff-Bulman’s moral motives, providing an integrative summary of two descriptions of the moral domain.

Damien Crone

Psychologist. Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences. The University of Melbourne, Melbourne. Australia.

Stefan Bode

Psychologist. Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences. The University of Melbourne. Melbourne. Australia.

Carsten Murawski

Economist. Department of Finance. The University of Melbourne. Australia.

Simon Laham

Psychologist. Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences. The University of Melbourne. Melbourne. Australia.

221/1504 The Influence of Visual Context on the Categorization of Facial Trustworthiness

Two studies investigated the influence of visual context on the categorization of facial trustworthiness by using mouse-tracking techniques. Results showed that threatening visual contexts influence the categorization of facial trustworthiness and its time dynamics over and beyond the mere effect of valence.

Marco Biella

PhD Student. Department of Psychology. University of Milano - Bicocca. Milano. Italy

Marco Brambilla

Researcher. Department of Psychology. University of Milano - Bicocca. Milano. Italy

Jonathan Freeman

Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. United States

221/1515 Harmfulness/Impurity versus Violations of Relational Model Principles: What explains moral perception across Turkey & US?

This paper adopts Relational Model Theory, hypothesizes that relationship violation constitutes moral wrongness; two cultures US and Turkey were addressed. Relational component made the case moral and RMT principles emerged as better predictors to understand moral wrongness in both cultures.

Beyza Tepe

Istanbul

Arzu Aydınlı Karakulak

Phd. Psychology Department. Bahçeşehir University. Istanbul. Turkey

221/1530 E-Autobiography: Understanding One’s (Professional) Life through Automated Analysis of One’s E-Mail Inbox

E-mails can serve as a rich source of information for understanding oneself in social interaction. The author downloaded his email inbox and applied statistical techniques to describe clusters of inbox contributors, topics associated with each cluster, and sentiments for cluster.

Mark Dechesne

Leiden University - Faculty of Governance and Global Affairs. The Hague. The Netherlands

221/1536 What is the Implicit Gender-Science Stereotype? Exploring Correlations between the Gender-Science IAT and Self-Report Measures

Implicit measures of the gender-science stereotype usually predict relevant outcomes better than explicit measures. This finding could reflect discrepancies between implicit and explicit stereotypes, but maybe the implicit measure is sensitive to personal attraction whereas the explicit stereotype does not.

Hila Zitelny

Psychologist. PhD student. Department of Psychology. Ben-Gurion University in the Negev. Be’er Sheva. Israel.

Michal Shalom

Psychologist. MA student. Department of Psychology. Ben-Gurion University in the Negev. Be’er Sheva. Israel.

Yoav Bar-Anan

Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Ben-Gurion University in the Negev. Be’er Sheva. Israel.

221/1542 The anger superiority effect vs. the happy face advantage

In a dot-probe task, participants were slower to disengage attention from angry faces than from reward smiles, with dominant and affiliative smiles falling in between. Our findings shed light on the anger superiority effect and the processing of happy faces.

Job van der Schalk

School of Psychology, Cardiff University

Magdalena Rychlowska

School of Psychology, Cardiff University

Ross Vanderwert

School of Psychology, Cardiff University

Tsvetina Ivanova

School of Psychology, Cardiff University

221/1543 The role of SES in the development of social preferences among Polish four-year-olds

The aim of this study was to find out whether the Social-Economic Status might be a factor related to the development of social preferences of Polish four-year-olds toward the members of more and less wealthy groups.

Paulina Szydłowska

Psychologist. Phd student at the Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. Cracow. Poland.

Marta Białecka-Pikul

Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. Cracow. Poland.

221/1557 Verbal and auditory hindsight bias in childhood

The current research assesses the presence of verbal and auditory hindsight bias in schoolchildren. Results show the presence of auditory hindsight bias and a positive correlation between the two tasks but only in one condition.

Cristina Gordo Gordo

Psychologist. Phd. CIMCYC. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

Sergio Moreno-Ríos

Psychologist. Professor. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

221/1595 Does sex sell everything and to everyone? Effects of sexualization in advertising.

Men showed higher purchasing intentions after viewing female-sexualized than neutral advertising whereas women showed the opposite pattern. Moreover, sexualized ads increased male beliefs that women enjoy being sexualized. Finally sexist attitudes moderated preference for sexualized ads regardless of gender.

Sarah Gramazio

PhD Student. Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialization. University of Padova. Padova. Italy

Mara Cadinu

Professor. Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialisation, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

221/1625 Stereotype-Target Congruence Appraisals Contribute to the Intercultural Flexibility of Individuals High on Cultural Metacognition

We examined social judgements among individuals high versus low on cultural metacognition. Three studies using a minimal group procedure tested whether individuals high (vs. low) on cultural metacognition attend more to stereotype-target congruence.

Shira Mor

Israel

221/1626 Spontaneous inferences of domain expertise

Expertise awareness is an important facet of knowledge exchange. In the tradition of spontaneous inferences research, we showed that people spontaneously infer others’ expertise from short social media updates. Subsequent experiments will examine the scope and boundaries of the effect.

Ana Levordashka

PhD candidate. Lebniz-Institut fuer Wissensmedien. Tuebingen. Germany.

Sonja Utz

Full Professor. University of Tübingen / Lebniz-Institut fuer Wissensmedien. Tuebingen. Germany.

221/1683 The role of unsuccessful guessing on learning in elementary school children

Unsuccessful testing seems to improve learning compared to study but this has yet to be explored in children. We found unsuccessful guessing, followed by feedback, to be a better learning method than both incorrect and correct study tasks.

Ana Lapa

PhD student in Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Lisbon. Lisbon. Portugal.

Paula Carneiro

Researcher in Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Lisbon. Lisbon. Portugal

221/1687 Perception of expert’s agency and communion - active advice effect

The study focus on the people perception of expert’s agency and communion. It’s results confirmed active advice effect and showed that 1) active recommendation increases physician’s evaluation on both dimension; 2) is independent on the level of activity.

Renata Maksymiuk

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Education and Psychology, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland

Renata Maksymiuk

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Education and Psychology, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland

Katazaryna Stasiuk

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Education and Psychology, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland

221/1696 Effects of objectifying gaze on female cognitive performance: The role of flow experience

The present study (N = 107 female participants) contributes to the objectification framework by showing that under male (vs. female) gaze, higher internalization of beauty ideals predicted lower flow experience, which in turn was responsible for disrupted attentional performance.

Francesca Guizzo

Research fellow. University of Padova, Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialization (DPSS)

Mara Cadinu

Associate Professor. University of Padova, Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialization (DPSS)

221/1719 Do you see me the way I see myself? Are narcissists more egocentric than others?

Since narcissists are highly self-centered, they are expected to develop biased metaperception (e.g. illusion of transparency). Three studies showed the opposite: the more individuals were narcissistic, the less they felt transparent. Narcissists’ metaperception was neither more egocentric nor biased.

Laetitia Renier

Psychologist. PhD student. Centre Emile Bernheim – CEB. Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management. Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium.

Claudia Toma

Professor. Centre Emile Bernheim. Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management. Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium.

Olivier Corneille

Professor. Psychological Sciences Research Institute. Department of Psychology. Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium.

221/1738 What if the princess in a commoner person? The effect of psychological distance on lessons learned from stories

In two experiments we examined whether psychological distance affects what people learn from stories. Results from both experiments showed that people draw more abstract conclusions when the stories described as far than as proximal.

Hadar Ram

Psychologist. PhD Student. School of Psychological Science. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel

221/1750 Reverse Correlation 2.0 - Combining a face space approach with up-to-date computer graphics

We present an updated version of reverse correlation combining a face space approach with up-to-date computer graphics. This technique enables not only to visualize people’s internal representations of stereotypes but also to create realistic looking stimuli for future studies.

Matthias David Keller

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Basel.

Leonie Reutner

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Basel.

Mirella Walker

Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Faculty of Psychology. University of Basel.

221/1764 The effects of approach and avoidance states on lie-detection accuracy

Three experiments examined perceivers’ lie-detection performance under different self-regulatory states. Overall, participants in approach and avoidance states did not differ in their ability to discriminate between truthful and deceptive messages, but approach participants displayed impaired performance relative to controls.

Karl Ask

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Rainer Greifeneder

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Marc-André Reinhard

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany.

Simon Schindler

Research Associate, Department of Psychology, University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany.

221/9001 Self-relevant personality traits lead to attitudinal change regardless of their valence

Across four studies (total N=467) this contribution shows that, regardless of stimuli valence, stimuli self-relevance increases implicit and explicit attitudes as well as identification with targets related to the self by means of the Self-Referencing task.

Marco Perugini

Psychologist. University of Milan-Bicocca. Italy.

Juliette Richetin

Psychologist. University of Milan-Bicocca. Italy.

Simone Mattavelli

Psychologist. University of Milan-Bicocca. Italy.

221/9003 Do changes in prejudice correspond to changes in outgroup identification and vice versa?

Three studies investigated the causal and bidirectional relationship between prejudice and outgroup identification. Changes in outgroup identification had direct and indirect effects on prejudice whereas changes in prejudice had an indirect effect on outgroup identification.

Curtis Phills

Psychologist. University of North Florida. Jacksonville. Florida. USA

Kerry Kawakami

Psychologist. York University. Toronto. Ontario. Canada

Danielle Krusemark

Psychologist. Florida State University. Tallahassee. Florida. USA

221/9005 Biases in Person Perception: Activation of the Self Increases Perceived Positivity of Others

Five experiments investigated the effect of self-priming on person judgments. Results consistently showed that activating the self leads to increased liking of other people. This was true for in-group and out-group others.

Jenny Roth

Psychologist. University of Wuerzburg. Germany

Andrew Rivers

Psychologist. University of California Davis. Davis. CA. USA

Jeffrey W. Sherman

Psychologist. University of California Davis. Davis. CA. USA

221/16801 Moral judgment and moral choice: the effects of personality traits

Big Five personality traits were investigated in relation to judgment and choice in moral dilemmas. Rejecting harmful actions in dilemmas may rely on either conscientiousness or agreeableness, depending on type of decision making perspective (judgment; choice), but not other traits.

Raluca Diana Szekely-Copindean

Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

Andrei C. Miu

Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

221/16802 Mere Liking Effect: The Role of Attitude Formation on Attributions of Morality and Trust

In three studies, we proved that mere manipulation of attitude formation (attitude similarity, mimicry, mere exposure effect) influenced the morality perception of the stranger. All studies showed that the effect of attitude formation on morality attributions was fully mediated by

Konrad Bocian

Department of Psychology, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sopot Campus, Sopot, Poland

Wieslaw Baryla

Department of Psychology, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sopot Campus, Sopot, Poland

Wojciech Marek Kulesza

Department of Social Psychology, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland

Bogdan Wojciszke

Department of Psychology, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sopot Campus, Sopot, Poland

221/16804 Who would you sacrifice, doctor or a telemarketer? The role of status in moral judgment

This study aims to disentangle the concept of acceptability and legitimacy in moral judgments particularly relating to the role of social dominance orientation in examining status related effects on sacrificial dilemmas.

Sindhuja Sankaran

Department of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

Joseph Sweetman

Department of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom

Maciek Sekerdej

institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland

Intergroup Relations

221/1219 Community social identity as a health protective factor for immigrant people

757 immigrants were interviewed. The results show that the community social identity is a good predictor of satisfaction with life; this variable being a mediator in the negative relation that social identity has with physical and mental health problems.

Patricia García-Leiva

University of Malaga

Juan Manuel Domínguez-Fuentes

University of Malaga

María Isabel Hombrados Mendieta

University of Malaga

Luis Gómez Jacinto

University of Malaga

221/1224 Influence of Direct and Extended Contact on the Development of Acculturation Preferences Among Majority Members

This longitudinal research, combining the theoretical traditions of contact and acculturation, provides evidence that indirect contact leads to changes in perceived ingroup norms, which should positively affect acculturation preferences over time in the majority group.

Belén Álvarez-Werth

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago. Chile.

Daniel Valdenegro

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago. Chile.

Michelle Bernardino

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago. Chile.

Siugmin Lay

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Royal Holloway, University of London. United Kingdom.

Tabea Hässler

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Universität Zürich. Zürich. Switzerland.

Carolina Rocha Santa María

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago. Chile.

221/1268 Collective gatherings, processes and emotional role: the celebration of The European Capital of Culture

A study (n=1086) evaluated the effects of collective participation on subjective wellbeing mediated by collective self-transcendence emotions, perceived emotional synchrony and shared flow. Collective emotional processes’ and shared flow’ effects are exposed with an emphasis on positive rituals.

José Pizarro

Psychologist. PhD Student. Social Pscychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. University of The Basque Country. Donostia. Spain

Dario Páez

Psychologist. Professor. Social Psychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. Psychology School. University of The Basque Country. Donostia. Spain

Nekane Basabe

Psychologist. Professor. Social Psychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. Psychology School. University of The Basque Country. Donostia. Spain

Silvia Da Costa

Psychologist. PhD student. Social Psychology and Behavioral Science Methodology Department. Psychology School. University of The Basque Country. Donostia. Spain

221/1305 Institutional Norms Bridge Latino and (Most) White Americans’ Response to Immigrant Reception

A multi-state study (N=1903) show that institutional norms bridge divide between Latino and most White Americans’ response to immigrant reception. Both groups show more positive affect and greater belonging in immigrant welcoming (vs. hostile) condition. Conservative Whites show opposite pattern.

Yuen Huo

Professor. Department of Psychology, University of California-Los Angeles, USA

John Dovido

Professor, Psychology Department, Yale University, New Haven USA

Deborah Schildkraut

Professor, Political Science Department, Tufts University, Boston USA

Tomas Jimenez

Associate Professor, Sociology Department, Stanford University, Palo Alto CA

221/1318 What shall I play with “us” and the “others”? Social representations through the drawings of children in Cyprus.

The current study examined the social representations that primary school children hold in Cyprus, through the activities they chose to represent, once asked to imagine themselves within a room with a child from their own and the “other” community.

Eleni Kotziamani

PhD Candidate, Psychology Department, University of Cyprus, Cyprus

221/1328 Justice and forgiveness following symmetric and asymmetric communal violence

The relationship between forgiveness and support for criminal prosecutions after wide scale conflict depends on whether the violence in one’s local community was asymmetric (i.e., disproportionally affected only one group) or symmetric (i.e., similarly affected members of adversary groups).

Sandra Penic

Post-doctoral researcher. Faculty of Social and Political Sciences. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland.

221/1330 Collective victim beliefs in the Hungarian context

In three survey studies we examined collective victim beliefs in the Hungarian context. Exclusive victim beliefs predicted negative intergroup attitudes, while inclusive victim beliefs predicted prosocial intergroup attitudes. All effects in all studies were significant after controlling for relevant variables.

Zsolt Péter Szabó

Social Psychologist. Social Psychology Department, ELTE University, Budapest, Hungary.

Johanna Vollhardt

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology, Clark University, Worcester, USA

Noemi Zsuzsanna Meszaros

Assistant Lecturer. Department of Social Psychology. Pazmany Peter Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary.

221/1332 Contact with refugees and the perceptions of local vs. national conflict: A field study

We examined the perceptions of refugees in a field study. People living close to a refugee shelter evaluated the intergroup relation as harmonious in contrast to those living further away. However, all participants perceived conflict on a national level.

Katja Albada

Research Master student. Social Psychology, Heymans institute. University of Groningen

221/1334 Stay away or stay together? Social contagion, common identity and bystanders’ interventions in bullying episodes

This study revealed that social contagion concerns are associated with less assertive interventions in homophobic bullying episodes, via increased masculinity/femininity threat. Importantly common identity also reduced social contagion concerns, thereby increasing bystanders’ assertive interventions.

Raquel António

PhD Student, Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, ISCTE-IUL, Centro de Investigação e Intervenção Social CIS-IUL, Lisboa, Portugal

Ana Rita Guerra

Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), CIS-IUL, Portugal

Carla Moleiro

Assistant Professor, Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, ISCTE-IUL, Centro de Investigação e Intervenção Social CIS-IUL, Lisboa, Portugal

221/1344 Categorization of ambiguous faces: the role of gender in protecting the humanity of the ingroup

In two studies, we studied the overexclussion effect in the categorization of ambiguous human/ape faces depends on group membership and gender of participants. Result shows that the two categorical dimensions studied (nationality and gender) were processed.

Ramón Rodríguez Torres

Professor. University of La Laguna

Paula Hernández Reyes

Psychologist. University of La Laguna

Laura Rodríguez Gómez

Psychologist. University of La Laguna

Luis Miguel García Izquierdo

Psychologist. University of La Laguna

Elena Delgado Acosta

Psychologist. University of La Laguna

221/1350 Reducing intergroup anxiety and threat towards immigrants: the role of empathy and sense of power

Effects of sense of power and empathic induction about an individual immigrant, on reduction of intergroup anxiety and threat towards the immigrant group as a whole, were studied. Soft power was negatively related to intergroup anxiety and intergroup threat through empathic concern.

Daniel Buraschi

Immigration Observatory of Tenerife. University of La Laguna. Tenerife. Spain.

Antonio Bustillos

Psychologist. Professor. Social and Organizational Psychology Department. Faculty of Psychology. UNED. Spain

Carmen Huici Casal

Psychologist. Professor. Social and Organizational Psychology Department. Faculty of Psychology. UNED

221/1363 Factors preventing and promoting homophobic bullying: a research in Italian secondary schools

This study investigated the frequency and types of homophobic bullying, and the specific underlying factors. Results showed that the homophobic bullying was predicted by gender, sexual-prejudice, muscularity or thinness concern, and students’ perception of teachers’ reactions to homophobic bullying.

Davide Zotti

PhD Student. Department of Life Sciences. University of Trieste. Trieste. Italy.

Valentina Piccoli

Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Life Sciences. University of Trieste. Trieste. Italy

Mauro Bianchi

Senior Researcher. COPELABS-Lusófona University. Lisbona. Portugal.

Lisa Di Blas.

Associate Professor. Department of Life Sciences. University of Trieste. Trieste. Italy

Giovanna Pelamatti

Full Professor. Department of Life Sciences. University of Trieste. Trieste. Italy

Andrea Carnaghi

Associate Professor. Department of Life Sciences. University of Trieste. Trieste. Italy

221/1377 Can you trust your new leader? – Cues for trust development

There has been a significant lack of longitudinal research focusing on different phases of trust development. Our study (based on 3-wave longitudinal field study) shed light on the impact of the social context on employees’ trust following a merger.

Jukka Lipponen

Senior lecturer, University of Helsinki, Finland

Janne Kaltiainen

University of Helsinki

Niklas Steffens

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/1399 Economic decision-making and trait anxiety in ultimatum game

The present study tested how trait anxiety modulates choices in the Ultimatum Game task. High trait anxiety participants were more influenced by positive and negative personal descriptors presented before the offers than low anxiety trait participants.

Víctor Manuel Moreno Jiménez

Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center, University of Granada, Spain

Alberto Acosta

Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center, University of Granada, Spain

Sonia Alguacil

Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center, University of Granada, Spain

María Ruz

Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center, University of Granada, Spain

221/1405 The relevance of intergroup ideologies on public policies: A majority member research

This research showed the importance of majority group members´s intergroup ideology in the acceptance of immigrant integration policies. In addition, the mediating effect of prejudice is shown in this relationship.

Pérez-Alcaraz Beatriz

Psychologist. Department of Psychiatry and Social Psychology. University of Murcia. Murcia. Spain

Martínez-Martínez Mª Carmen

Assistant Profesor. Department of Psychiatry and Social Psychology. University of Murcia. Murcia. Spain

Ramírez de la Fé Mª Carmen

Assistant Profesor. Department of Psychiatry and Social Psychology. University of Murcia. Murcia. Spain

221/1413 Linking Ruminative Thinking and System Justification to Political Protest

Rumination about political issues was studied as a predictor of system justification and willingness to protest. Results show that people who tend to ruminate about politics justify less the system and are more willing to protest.

Alvaro Rodriguez

Canterbury

Eduardo Vasquez

Lecturer in Forensic Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom.

Aleksandra Cichocka

Lecturer in Political Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. United Kingdom.

221/1429 Does Social Dominance Orientation predict moral transgressions? A mediation model

Using vignettes in a general population survey, we found that SOD predicts the proclivity to commit moral transgressions. Moreover, this relationship was mediated by empathy. People high in SDO score low in empathy and are more likely to commit transgressions.

Héctor Carvacho

Assistant Professor, School of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

Jorge Manzi

Professor, School of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

221/1437 White and Asian Americans’ attitudes toward White/Asian interracial couples

Asian men (but not Asian women) perceived White male/Asian female couples more negatively than Asian male/White female couples. White men (but not White women) perceived Asian male/White female couples more negatively than White male/Asian female couples.

Yun Ju Chuang

Wesleyan University

Minxuan Tan

Postdoctoral fellow. Wesleyan University

Clara L. Wilkins

Professor. Wesleyan University

221/1439 Perceived scarcity reduces liking toward Asian/White interracial couples

We examined Realistic Group Conflict Theory by manipulating Asian men’s perceived scarcity of Asian women. When in the scarcity, but not abundance condition, Asian men reduced warmth towards White male/Asian female couples as perceived availability of Asian women decreased.

Mingxuan Tan

Post doc. Department of Psychology. Wesleyan University.

Yun Ju Chuang

Wesleyan University

Clara "L" Wilkins

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Wesleyan University

221/1459 Animals as Social Objects: Status, Cooperation, and Threat towards Human Beings

Two studies explored the perceived cooperation, social status, and threat regarding “animals” generically considered and 15 animal species. Relations between these variables and Warmth and Competence’s dimensions are presented. When non-human animals are considered extensively, results replicated SCM’s structural relations.

Verónica Sevillano

Psychologist.Social Psychology and Methodology Department. Facultad de Psicología. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid. España

Susan T. Fiske

Social psychologist. Department of Psychology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.

221/1473 Political blogs: an optimal sphere for nationalist political communication and persuasion

This study demonstrates that political blogs provide features that allow for the expression of radical and even racist views, whilst simultaneously protecting the speaker from charges of racism. Thus, blogs constitute an optimal sphere for nationalist political communication and persuasion.

Katarina Pettersson

Social Psychologist. Department of Social Research. University of Helsinki. Helsinki. Finland

Inari Sakki

Social Psychologist. PhD. Department of Social Research. University of Helsinki. Helsinki. Finland

Karmela Liebkind

Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Social Research. University of Helsinki. Helsinki. Finland

221/1474 The influence of perspective taking and perceived openness of a refugee on confidence in integration

The perceived distance to a desirable level of integration of refugees is influenced by perspective taking and perceived openness of a described refugee. Preferences for transformative integration (vs. assimilation) are influenced by political orientation, perspective taking and perceived openness.

Judith Knausenberger

Psychologist. University of Muenster. Muenster. Germany.

Melanie Chahrour

Student. University of Muenster. Muenster. Germany.

Gerald Echterhoff

Psychologist. Professor. University of Muenster. Muenster. Germany.

221/1489 When fear and Justification meet: Fear of system justification as a driving process among disadvantaged groups

The present research offers that some members of the disadvantaged group may be afraid to justify the system and to contribute to making it seem normal, a process that can have various implications.

Yafa Krayem

M.A. student, Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya (IDC)

Eran Halperin

Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology Dean

Tamar Saguy

Associate Professor at the Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology

221/1510 Mindfulness-based intervention in anxiety regulation for reducing intergroup bias in children.

An anxiety regulation intervention aimed at reducing intergroup bias towards immigrants is conducted with children. The results show significant correlation between the follow-up of the program and the intergroup bias when the initial level of emotion regulation was controlled.

Mª Carmen Ramírez de la Fe

Professor of Social Psychology. University of Murcia. Murcia. Spain.

Carmen Martínez Martínez

Professor of Group Psychology. University of Murcia. Murcia. Spain.

221/1517 Nationhood in the non-Western world: National identity and intergroup relations in Mauritius

The common ethnic-civic distinction does not generalize to the context of Mauritius. In Mauritius national identity is understood in terms of ideological beliefs (multicultural tolerance), civic nationhood and cultural practices. These three types of content relate differently to intergroup attitudes.

Femke Van der Werf

European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Maykel Verkuyten

European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Borja Martinovic

European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

Caroline Ng Tseung-Wong

Department of Social Studies - Psychology Unit. Faculty of Social Studies and Humanities. University of Mauritius. Réduit. Mauritius.

221/1521 Meritocracy and decisions towards low status groups in moral dilemmas

This research analyses the impact of meritocracy on socially critical decisions about low status groups. We present two experimental studies showing that when a meritocratic norm is made salient, participants see the sacrifice of low status victims as more acceptable.

Rui Costa-Lopes

Research Fellow, ICS - University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

Wilson Moreira

Psychologist, FP - University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

221/1528 Masculinity threats: Evaluations of male and female targets based on masculinity and sexuality

Masculinity threat among heterosexual men is associated with decreased positive evaluations and increased anticipated negative emotions towards feminine gay male targets. Self-affirmation eliminated the impact of masculinity threat and masculinity threat was not found to impact evaluations of female targets.

Eric Berru

Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, California State University - San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, USA

Sergio Iniquez

Associate Professor, University of Texas El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA

Cari Goetz

Assistant Professor, California State University - San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, USA

Kevin M. Silberman

Graduate Student, California State University - Fullerton,Fullerton, CA, USA

Ellen E. Newell

Assistant Professor, Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, PA, USA

Clara L. Wilkins

Assistant Professor, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, USA

221/1537 Why are children poor?: development of causal attributions of child poverty in childhood

We examined the development of causal attributions of child poverty in childhood (N=108, 6-12 years-old) and found that social explanations and the complexity of the understanding of poverty increase with age. Moreover, school social-economic status influences attributions of child poverty.

Leonor Pereira da Costa

PhD Candidate, Center for Social Research and Intervention (CIS-IUL), ISCTE – University Institute of Lisbon, Portugal

Ricardo Borges Rodrigues

Invited Assistant Professor, Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, ISCTE – University Institute of Lisbon, Portugal

Sven Waldzus

Associated Professor, Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, ISCTE – University Institute of Lisbon, Portugal

221/1547 Can Imagined Contact with Deviant Outgroup Members Reduce Prejudice?

Present study showed that, imagined contact with a counternormative outgroup, but not a counternormative ingroup, member reduces prejudice relative to a control condition. These findings inform both practical and theoretical approaches to prejudice reduction.

Orkun Yetkili

Lecturer in Psychology. Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London, W1W 6UW, United Kingdom

Dominic Abrams

Professor. School of Psychology, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP, United Kingdom

Giovanni Travaglino

Lecturer in Social and Organisational Psychology. School of Psychology, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP, United Kingdom

Roger Giner-Sorolla

Professor. School of Psychology, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP, United Kingdom

221/1573 Socially Critical Decisions Towards Low Status Groups

The impact of social status and the role of descriptive meritocracy in critical decision-making processes. 149 Participants made a decision about the allocation of organ transplant for a high status target and a low status target. Low status group are more likely to receive a lower level of priority.

Ana Filipa Albuquerque Madeira

Social Psychologist. Doctoral Candidate. Institute of Social Sciences. University of Lisbon. Lisbon. Portugal.

Ana Filipa Albuquerque Madeira

Social Psychologist. Doctoral Candidate. Institute of Social Sciences. University of Lisbon. Lisbon. Portugal.

221/1590 Ethnic Differences in the Role of Religion and Spirituality in Mediating the Effects of Racial Discrimination on Wellbeing of Black and White Americans and South Africans

Members of stigmatized groups often seek comfort in religion/spirituality. We proposed that religion/spirituality would mediate the adverse effects of racial discrimination on stigmatized groups’ (e.g., Black Americans/South Africans) wellbeing but not that of the dominant groups (e.g., White Americans/South Africans).

Kamiya Stewart

California State University, San Bernardino

Donna M. Garcia

California State University, San Bernardino

Kelly Campbell

California State University, San Bernardino

221/1591 Better Quiet than a Complainer: How Personal Concerns Reduce Women’s Willingness to Express Anger

Can emotion expression be seen as costly? We investigated the role of perceived individual costs and collective benefits on women’s willingness to express anger about sexism. As expected, women expressed less anger than they experienced due to individual costs.

Julia Sasse

Current: Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands / Future: Psychologist. Max-Planck-Institute for Collective Goods. Bonn. Germany.

Jolien van Breen

Current: Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

Russell Spears

Current: Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

Ernestine H. Gordijn

Current: Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands.

221/21702 Identity intersections in work life: Biases against prototypical applicants

In three experiments, participants rated applicants of different social identity categories. Findings indicate that belonging to non-prototypical identities may protect from negative stereotype ratings. Vice versa, prototypical male and female applicants were discriminated most.

Claudia Niedlich

Psychologist. Social, Environmental, and Economic Psychology. University of Koblenz-Landau. Landau. Germany.

Melanie C. Steffens

Professor. Social, Environmental, and Economic Psychology. University of Koblenz-Landau. Landau. Germany.

221/21703 Cross-categorisation in the courtroom: Gender, sexual orientation, and perceptions of defendant guilt

This research explored competing stereotypic crime-defendant attributions – and found an interaction between the gender-based stereotypicality of the crime, and the defendant’s gender and sexual orientation. Sexual orientation attributions appear to supersede gender attributions in mock juror’s perceptions of guilt.

Joel Anderson

Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Melbourne. Melbourne. Australia.

Michael Thai

Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. St Lucia. Australia.

Thekla Morgenroth

Psychologist. Social, Environmental and Organisational. University of Exeter. Exeter. England.

221/21704 Identity intersections: An attempt to integrate theoretical models of impression formation

Theoretical models of impression formation that may be applied to identity intersections will be integrated into one model based on the continuum model, the stereotype-content model, and the lack-of-fit model. Many hypothesized processes will be integrated into the model.

Melanie Steffens

Professor. Social, Environmental, and Economic Psychology. University of Koblenz-Landau. Landau. Germany.

Attitudes, emotion and motivation

221/1320 Development and Validation of the Barriers to Knowledge Sharing Scale

Our aim was to develop a questionnaire to measure barriers to knowledge sharing in virtual communities of practice. The sample was based on 330 participants. Results showed good psychometric properties and demonstrated a three-factor solution: personal, procedural and technological barriers.

Nuria Gamero Vázquez

Psychologist. Assistant professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Seville. Seville. Spain

Virginia Orengo

Psychologist. Professor. IDOCAL. University of Valencia. Valencia. Spain

Jesús Sánchez

Psychologist. Researcher. IDOCAL. University of Valencia. Valencia. Spain

Ana Zornoza

Psychologist. Professor. IDOCAL. University of Valencia. Valencia. Spain

Carolina Moliner

Psychologist. Professor. IDOCAL. University of Valencia. Valencia. Spain

221/1323 Liking, respect, and the social induction of affect

The research examines the role of liking and respect in the social induction of affect. We manipulated emotional expression and communal/agentic traits of the target. Our findings demonstrated that liking moderated, whereas respect did not influence the induction of affect.

Monika Wróbel

University of Lodz. Institute of Psychology. University of Lodz. Lodz. Poland.

221/1333 Marital problems and marital satisfaction: the moderating effects of suppression and tolerance

This study examines the moderating effects of suppression and tolerance on the relationship between marital problem and marital satisfaction. The research findings indicate that suppression exacerbates the negative effect of marital problem on marital satisfaction, while tolerance eases the harmful influence of marital problem on marital satisfaction.

Pin-Hsuan Ting

Department of Child and Family Studies, Fu Jen Catholic University

Tsui-Shan Li

Professor of Fu-Jen Catholic University

221/1336 The influence of self-conscious emotions compared to basic emotions on children's self-regulation

We find that distinct positive emotions differently influence children’s self-regulation efforts. Children were worse in delaying gratification following when they experienced pride than joy. However, they were better in delaying gratification when they merely imagined experiencing pride than joy.

Einav Shimoni

Psychologist. Ben-Gurion University. Israel

Tal Eyal

Psychologist. Ben gurion university. Israel

221/1353 The Model of Motivational Balance: Identifying Motivational Patterns at Individual, Dyadic, Group, and Inter-groups Level.

The Motivational Balance Model identifies interaction patterns among qualitative (intrinsic/extrinsic) and quantitative (valence, expectancy, agency) motivational forces at individual, dyadic, group and inter-groups levels. A formal motivational vector (strength and orientation) for qualitative (structural) and quantitative (infrastructural) forces is presented.

catalin mamali

Department of Social Sciences, Northeast Iowa Community College, Iowa, USA

221/1364 Why are young adults less politically involved? The role of political value and expectancy

We propose a motivational expectancy-value perspective to analyze the age-political participation relationship. Two studies with Israeli and U.S. samples showed that political value mediated the relationship between age and participation whereas political expectancy mediated this relationship only in the U.S.

Avner Caspi

Psychologist, Department of Psychology and Education, Open University of Israel, Israel

Ido Liviatan

Psychologist, Department of Psychology and Education, Open University of Israel, Israel

Eran Chajut

Psychologist, Department of Psychology and Education, Open University of Israel, Israel

Sonia Roccas

Psychologist, Department of Psychology and Education, Open University of Israel, Israel

221/1369 Predicting teachers’ intention to report cases of child abuse

Teachers’ intention to report child abuse was predicted using TRA and TPB in a 2 (abuse severity) x 4 (abuse type) design. TRA was better for intention prediction of less severe cases, whereas TPB did better for severe cases.

Georgios Abakoumkin

Social Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Laboratory of Psychology. Department of Early Childhood Education. University of Thessaly. Volos. Greece.

Athanasia-Dimitra Christodoulou

Teacher. Laboratory of Psychology. Department of Early Childhood Education. University of Thessaly. Volos. Greece.

Eleftheria Tseliou

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Laboratory of Psychology. Department of Early Childhood Education. University of Thessaly. Volos. Greece.

221/1384 Making Use of Regret Increases the Number of One’s Friends

We examined whether individual tendencies to experience, anticipate, and make use of regret influence social adaptation. A vignette study revealed that experiencing regret correlated negatively, and making use of regret correlated positively, with the number of friends reported.

Asuka Komiya

Psychologist. Associate Professor. School of Integrated Arts and Sciences. Hiroshima University. Hiroshima. Japan.

Ai Mizokawa

Psychologist. Lecturer. School of Human Sciences. Sugiyama Jogakuen University. Aichi. Japan.

Takayuki Goto

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Center for the Promotion of Excellence in Higher Education. Kyoto University.

221/1395 Dissonance and abstraction: Cognitive conflict leads to higher level of construal

This study investigated the effects of cognitive conflict on abstraction. Results revealed that an abstract mindset was in fact activated when participants experienced cognitive conflict. This suggest that cognitive conflicts are closely related to increased abstraction.

Sebastian Cancino-Montecinos

PhD-student. Deparment of Psychology. Stockholm university. Stockholm. Sweden.

Torun Lindholm

Professor. Deparment of Psychology. Stockholm university. Stockholm. Sweden

221/1397 Predictors of privacy concerns on Facebook

This study was intended to discover whether personality traits, self-esteem and trust has an association with or predict individuals’ concerns about the privacy of their personal information on Facebook and therefore extends the literature on information privacy concerns.

Zsuzsanna Dobrontei

Psychology PhD Student. Department of Psychology. Royal Holloway University of London. Egham. United Kingdom.

221/1407 The Mediating Effect of Honor System Justification on the Relationship between Regulatory Focus and Honor Related Violence

The purpose of the study was to examine the mediating effect of honor system justification on the relationship between promotion-prevention regulatory focus and attitudes toward honor related violence against women in Turkey which is accepted as honor culture.

Nuray Sakallı-Uğurlu

Professor. Psychology Department, Middle East Technical University

Gülçin Akbaş-Uslu

Social Psychologist, Ph.D.

221/1411 Observers’ myths and victim’s perceived power influence the attributions of blame to abused women

Myths about intimate partner violence against women and information on the victim’s status and power influences the attribution of blame to abused women.

Virginia Toro García

Phd Student. Centro Mente Cerebro y Comportamiento. University of Granada. Spain.

Jesús López Megías

Professor. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Granada. Spain.

Hugo Carretero Dios

Professor. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Granada. Spain.

221/1414 More being than having: Distinguishing between two existential orientations

Results of this study (N = 96) show that more to-be goals than to-have goals were listed. Number of to-have goals correlated with both materialism and egoistic orientation of voluntary work, whereas number of to-be goals correlated with altruistic orientation.

Elke Rohmann

Psychologist. Dr. Ruhr-University Bochum. Faculty of Psychology. Bochum. Germany.

Jens Förster

Psychologist. Professor. Ruhr-University Bochum. Faculty of Psychology. Bochum. Germany.

221/1417 The Role of Regulatory Focus in Expectations Concerning Consequences of Small Business Growth

This study investigated the role of regulatory focus in predicting differences in expected consequences of small business growth. It was found that promotion (prevention) focus can indeed positively (negatively) predict one’s positive expected consequences of small business growth.

Bramesada Prasastyoga

PhD student, Social and Organizational Psychology Unit, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

Esther van Leeuwen

Assistant Professor, Social and Organizational Psychology Unit, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Leiden, Leiden, The Netherlands

Fieke Harinck

Assistant Professor, Social and Organizational Psychology Unit, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Leiden, Leiden, The Netherlands

221/1428 Attitudes toward peace process in Colombia. Knowledge and emotions

The research aimed to know the attitudes of the population of a region in Colombia about peace process. The study examined five factors. It is concluded that the attitude towards the peace process was defined by emotions

Nelson Molina-Valencia

Psychologist, Professor Universidad del Valle, Psychology Institute.

Adolfo Alvarez

Social Worker, Universidad del Valle

Javier Cadavid

Political Scientist, Universidad del Valle. Political Studies Program

Johanna Ceballos

Psychologist, Universidad del Valle, Psychology Institute

221/1433 The paradoxical pursuit of happiness

Modern society's emphasis on happiness may lead to the experience of a happiness norm, and by some even to a felt pressure to be happy. We show that a happiness norm increases happiness, whereas happiness pressure decreases it.

Asteria Devy Kumalasari

PhD Student. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

Johan C. Karremans

Associate Professor. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

William M. van der Veld

Research Consultant. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

Ap Dijksterhuis

Professor. Behavioural Science Institute. Radboud University. Nijmegen. The Netherlands.

221/1435 Does culture moderate use of the hunchback heuristic in status-based anger attributions? A multi-nation test.

Perceivers often associate low status groups with anger more than high status groups. However, researchers contend that this hunchback stereotype is apparent only in individualist (not collectivist) cultures. We examined this cultural moderation hypothesis and found no evidence for it.

Maas Misha'ari Weerabangsa

PhD Candidate, School of Psychology, University of Nottingham (Malaysia Campus), Semenyih, Malaysia

Chuma Owuamalam

Assistant Professor, School of Psychology, University of Nottingham (Malaysia Campus), Semenyih, Malaysia

Matia Okubo

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Senshu, Tokyo, Japan

Shanu Shukla

Research Scholar, Department of Psychology, Indian Institute of Technology, Indore, India

221/1442 Differences between Nuclear-related Employees and Undergraduates in Acceptance of Nuclear Power after the Fukushima Disaster

We compared risk perception, benefit perception, trusts and acceptances of nuclear-power generation between Japanese nuclear facility employees and undergraduates majored in humanities and social sciences or natural sciences and technologies after the Fukushima disaster.

Yasunari Okabe

Psychologist, Specially Appointed Associate Professor,Schools of Agriculture and Animal Science,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Japan

Jinmin Wang

Psychologist, Professor, Faculty of Risk and Crisis Management, Chiba Institute of Science, Choshi, Japan

Masahide Saito

Psychologist, Associate Professor, Faculty of Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Setagaya, Japan

Yoshie Ito

Psychologist, Assistant Professor,College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Funabashi, Japan

221/1443 The effect of culture-specific religious priming on prosocial behavior in Japan

We examined the effect of culture-specific religious priming in a Japanese sample (n = 102) in a dictator game. The results showed the culture-specific religious priming did not increase the amount of money allocated compared to other conditions (control/secular justice).

Sanae Miyatake

PhD student, Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Human Sciences

Masataka Higuchi

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Faculty of Human Sciences.

221/1448 Perceptions of the Economy and Environmental Attitudes: An Empirical Study

This study tackles the lack of consensus in the literature regarding the relationship between the state of the economy and environmental attitudes. Key psychological processes are found to explain how beliefs are formed about the economy, ultimately affecting environmental attitudes.

Stephanie Rizio

PhD Candidate. School of Psychological Sciences. The University of Melbourne. Melbourne. Australia.

221/1451 The Effect of Organizational Ethical Climate on Attitude to Organization Wrongdoing among Japanese Salaried Employees

This study examined the effect of ethical climate on attitude towards wrongdoing. The results of a survey of 1500 Japanese employees confirmed effects of factors of organizational climate on employees’ negative emotion, unethical judgment, and perceived seriousness about wrongdoing.

Jinmin Wang

Psychologist. Professor. Chiba Institute of Science, Choshi, Japan.

221/1453 Effect of disability cognitive bias modification task on attitudes towards people with a disability

We developed a cognitive bias modification task targeting the interpretation bias about people with a disability. Our experiment was successful, we found that our participants had more positive interpretations. We found no effect on our implicit or explicit attitude measures.

Vanja Van Aarsen

PhD student KU Leuven, Belgium

221/1457 The Effect of Self-Objectification and Perceived Physical Attractiveness On Thought-Reliance.

Two studies revealed that perceived physical attractiveness can influence the extent to which people rely on their mental constructs in guiding behavior, especially to the extent to which people see themselves as physical objects (self-objectification).

Joana Mello

PhD Student, William James Center for Research, ISPA- Institututo Universitário. Lisbon, Portugal

Teresa Garcia-Marques

Psychologist Professor, Social and Organization Psychology Department, ISPA- Instituto Universitário, Lisboa, Portugal

Pablo Briñol

Full Professor. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, Spain

Ana Cancela

Assistant Professor. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, Spain

Richard E. Petty

Full Professor. Ohio State University. Ohio, USA

221/1461 Pride and prejudice? The influence of race on how people perceive a pride display

Due to negative stereotypes, we expected that Blacks displaying pride would be rated higher in hubristic and lower in authentic pride compared to Whites. Contrary to predictions, in three experiments Whites displaying pride were seen as more hubristic than Blacks.

Jason Martens

Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, United Kingdom

Toni Schmader

Professor, Psychology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Jason Lawrence

Associate Professor, Psychology Department, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, United States

221/1467 Societal fear and online hate after November 2015 Paris attacks

Societal fear might be shaped by social media discussions. This comparative study showed that the exposure to online hate was associated with perception of societal fear after November 2015 Paris attacks. Online hate may escalate societal fear and uncertainty.

Atte Oksanen

Professor. University of Tampere. Finland.

Markus Kaakinen

Researcher. University of Tampere. Finland

221/1499 Social Power and Dimensions of Self-Control: Does Power Benefit Initiatory Self-Control but Impair Inhibitory Self-Control?

In constrast to prior studies, the successful manipulation of social power had no effect on performance in established self-control tasks that require either start self-control (needed for initiating and maintaining goal-directed behavior) or stop self-control (needed for suppressing behavior).

Sonja Heller

Psychologist. Department of Psychology, Social Psychology. University of Zurich. Zurich, Switzerland.

221/1507 Dissociating Approach and Avoidance from Good and Bad

The present study shows that approach and avoidance change attitudes only when it is implicitly related to good versus bad. However, when good and bad are experimentally dissociated from approach and avoidance, the effect vanishes.

Asi Schupak

Phd student the Hebrew University of Israel and The Open University of Israel

Rona Grad

PhD student,Psychology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv,Israel

Daniel Algom

Psychologist. Professor. Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

Eran Chajut

Psychologist. Professor. The Open University of Israel, Tel Aviv, Israel

221/1519 The Effects of Moral Disengagement and Empathy on the AttitudesToward Male Violence

The roles of moral disengagement and empathy on attitudes toward male violence were investigated. Moral disengagement has a moderator effect between remorse and identification with women. Participants in cheating condition evaluated male violence more fair than participants in other conditions.

Ahmet Yasin Şenyurt

Psychologist. Lecturer. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey.

Meral Gezici Yalçın

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Abant İzzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

Bedirhan Gültepe

Psychologist. Research Assistant. Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Abant İzzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

Hamit COSKUN

Psychologist. Professor. Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Abant İzzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

221/1535 The role of culture related individual differences constructs on motivation and intentions

The role of independence and interdependence as moderators of the effect of autonomous motivation on physical activity intentions and behaviour was examined. Data analysis in a structured questionnaire study revealed that participants holding interdependent self-construals were more likely to form intentions and manifest behaviour on the basis of subjective norms than those holding an independent self who were more likely to form intentions based on perceived behavioural control.

Panagiotis Rentzelas

Birmingham

221/1548 Collectively angry? Emotional content in Wikipedia articles on negative man-made and nature-made events

Negative events such as terrorist attacks elicit strong emotions (i.e., anger). We investigated whether such angry reactions get into supposedly neutral Wikipedia articles. In three studies, articles on terrorist attacks contained more anger-related content than articles on other negative events.

Hannah Greving

Psychologist. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien. Tübingen. Germany.

Aileen Oeberst

Psychologist. Jun.-Professor. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien. Tübingen. Germany.

Joachim Kimmerle

Psychologist. Professor. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien. Tübingen. Germany.

Ulrike Cress

Psychologist. Professor. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien. Tübingen. Germany.

221/1553 Troubles with Bayesianism: An Introduction to the Psychological Immune System

Bayesianism is well-suited to explaining mental processes that exemplify our rationality, such as belief updating; however, people don’t update information in a Bayesian way. Instead of approximating a Bayesian processor, belief updating functions to maintain a Psychological Immune System.

Eric Mandelbaum

Philosophy Professor, Graduate Center, City University of New York

221/1555 Paradox of responsibility. The connection between sexism, rape myth acceptance, identity salience and perpetrator’s traits

We examined people’s responses to a rape case in Hungary at two time points, before and after it became certain. Our research revealed that rape myth acceptance, and salient identities of the perpetrator and observers affect judgements in ambiguous situations.

Boglárka Nyúl

Psychologist. PhD student. Doctoral School of Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

Dávid Ferenczy

Psychology student. Faculty of Education and Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

Anna Kende

Psychologyist. Associate Professor and Head of Department. Department of Social Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.

221/1561 The role of mortality salience and reason of conflict in victim blaming

The present study examined the role of mortality salience and reason of conflict in victim blaming. Participants who contemplated about their own death expressed more tolerance toward victim in the honor-based conflict condition than in the financial conflict condition.

Nuray Sakalli-Ugurlu

Middle East Technical University

Suzan Ceylan

Middle East Technical University

Canay Dogulu

Middle East Technical University

Gulcin Akbas

Middle East Technical University

221/1564 Does perception of intentionality changes with social closeness and the context of the moral violations?

This research aimed to connect attribution theory and Shweder’s three moral ethics and sought to find interaction between moral domains and social closeness within perception of intentionality. Results demonstrated attribution bias in Autonomy and Community but not in Divinity violations.

Zeynep Ecem Piyale

Isik University, Psychology Department

Sevim Cesur

Istanbul University, Psychology Department

221/1566 The Intergenerational Socialization of Emotional Processes in Intergroup Settings

Parents influence how their children experience the world in intergroup conflicts, where emotions shape attitudes towards the outgroup. In the current research, we examine emotional socialization from parent to child in the Israeli-Palestinian context.

Shira Ran

Ph.D student, the Department of Psychology, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the School of Psychology, IDC Herzliya, Israel

Eran Halperin

Dean, the New School of Psychology, IDC Herzliya, Israel

Maya Tamir

Professor, the Department of Psychology, The Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel

Michal Reifen Tagar

Professor, the New School of Psychology, IDC Herzliya, Israel

221/1570 What factors are correlated with desire for anthropomorphized romantic relationships?

Some romantic video game players fall in love with virtual characters. Anthropomorphized romantic relationships seem very similar to actual romantic relationships. This study revealed what aspects of romantic games cause plays to fall in love with virtual characters.

Mayu Koike

PhD Psychology Edinburgh

221/1577 Aristocratic versus democratic moral commitments in the socio-economic context. Legitimisation and possibilities of resistance

Our findings show how social positioning defines economic explanations, and this relationship is mediated by perception of threat and the moral commitments. Descriptive results show the lack of democratic commitment concerning authority and basic conditions of human development in Hungary.

Ildiko Bokretas

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Pécs Pécs. Hungary

Bálint Takács

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Pécs. Pécs. Hungary

Sara Bigazzi

Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. Institute of Psychology. University of Pécs. Pécs. Hungary

Sara Serdult

Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Pécs. Pécs. Hungary

221/1777 An emotional route to decreasing out-group dehumanization

We studied the effect of being moved on out-group dehumanization by showing participants a video clip depicting out-group members acting morally towards each other. Being moved predicted humanization of the protagonist which generalized to decreased dehumanization of the out-group.

Johanna Katarina Blomster

PhD Student. Department of Psychology. University of Oslo. Oslo. Norway.

Beate Seibt

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Oslo. Oslo. Norway.

221/1875 Health halo effect: new evidence for an explanation in term of affect diffusion

We investigated mechanisms behind the health halo effect. We provided tests of this effect in term of positive/negative affect diffusion on caloric evaluation. Results suggest that positive labels lead to positive caloric evaluation and negative label to negative caloric evaluation.

Nicolas Bochard

Université Grenoble Alpes

Dominique Muller

Université Grenoble Alpes

Norbert Schwarz

University of South California

221/1888 Perceptual and processing fluency in intuitive judgments.

According to results of two experimental studies we conclude that, to the extent affective responses moderate the accuracy of coherence judgments and participants’ confidence in them, intuitive responding depends on the fluency related to both perception and processing.

Joanna Sweklej

Psychologist. Faculty of Psychology. SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities. Warsaw. Poland.

221/18501 Interpersonal emotion regulation: The effect of support goals on emotion sharing

We share our emotions with others, but how do we obtain the type of support we seek? We present a study investigating the dynamics of interpersonal emotion regulation. Specifically, we show how support goals affect people’s emotional expressions towards others.

Lisanne Pauw

Doctoral Candidate. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Disa Sauter

Assistant Professor. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Gerben A. van Kleef

Professor. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Agenta Fischer

Professor. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

221/18502 Emotive Virtual Confederates in Negotiation.

Artificial agents with human-like qualities (“virtual confederates”) are useful in empirical studies. Are these virtual characters capable of eliciting emotional responses similar to those elicited by humans? We present a platform for their design and data to support their use.

Johnathan Mell

Doctoral Candidate. Institute for Creative Technologies. University of Southern California. Los Angeles. USA.

Jonathan Gratch

Professor. Institute for Creative Technologies. University of Southern California. Los Angeles. USA.

221/18503 Steal and smile: Emotion expressions and trust in intergroup resource dilemmas

People’s decisions in interpersonal resource dilemmas are influenced by others’ emotional displays. Our experiments show that emotions expressed by one outgroup member following unfair behaviors affect the trust individuals have in other members of the same outgroup.

Magdalena Rychlowska

Postdoctoral Research Associate. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Job van der Schalk

Lecturer. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Johnathan Gratch

Professor. Institute for Creative Technologies. University of Southern California. Los Angeles. USA.

Paula M Niedenthal

Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Wisconsin–Madison. Madison. USA

Antony Manstead

Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

221/18504 The effects of emotion on collective guilt and reparation in intergroup trust games.

Extant research documents the importance of guilt as a relationship-repairing emotion. Our two experiments focused on guilt in intergroup settings. We show that feelings of guilt after an ingroup member’s transgression reliably predict reparative behavior towards the outgroup.

Danielle Shore

Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK.

Brian Parkinson

Professor. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK.

221/18505 The paradox of intergroup apology.

We report two studies examining an as-yet untested model of intergroup reconciliation, the ‘Staircase Model’. Applying the model to two historical conflicts, we found that its steps enhanced forgiveness, improved evaluations of the outgroup, and reduced anger, fear, and disgust.

Sam Nunney

Doctoral Candidate. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Antony Manstead

Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK.

Group Processes

221/1326 The effects of group leaders’ flexibility on members’ emotional state and protest behaviour

In one study participants played the "Dictator Game”. We manipulated leader’s flexibility and presence of social support. Social support predicted individuals’ motivations to protest or not, whereas leader’s flexibility determined the type of protest/reaction towards the leader (legitimation vs repression).

Carina Sofia Dias

PhD Student. Faculty of Psychology and Education Science of the University of Porto. Porto. Portugal

Isabel Pinto

Social Psychologist. Faculty of Psychology and Education Science of the University of Porto and Instituto de Ciências Sociais, Universidade de Lisboa. Porto and Lisboa. Portugal

José M. Marques

Social Psychologist. Faculty of Psychology and Education Science of the University of Porto and Instituto de Ciências Sociais, Universidade de Lisboa. Porto and Lisboa. Portugal

Tiago O. Paiva

PhD Student. Faculty of Psychology and Education Science of the University of Porto. Porto. Portugal.

Fernando Barbosa

Psychologist. Faculty of Psychology and Education Science of the University of Porto. Porto. Portugal.

Sónia G. Cardoso

Postdoctoral Researcher. Instituto de Ciências Sociais, Universidade de Lisboa. Lisboa. Portugal.

221/1327 Commitment for collective action among unemployed and temporary workers in Italy: A matter of perceived injustice, collective efficacy or social identity?

Two studies investigate the role of meritocracy, perceived injustice, collective efficacy and identity concerns as predictors of collective action among unemployed people and temporary workers. Results extent prior literature, by integrating ideological explanations to an identity-based approach on collective action.

Emanuele Politi

Social Psychologist, Ph.D. Student. Social Psychology Lab, Department of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

Emanuele Politi

Social Psychologist, Ph.D Student. Social Psychology Lab, Department of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

221/1331 Narratives of Empowerment: Participation in Solidarity Movements

Participation in collective action includes a distinct course of action and an enactment of a specific social identity. The present research explores the implications for participants understanding of self and others through an analysis of their experience in solidarity initiatives.

Spyridon Logothetis

Psychologist,Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, The Open University

221/1342 Valuing group values: How group values can motivate pro-environmental attitudes and behaviours.

We investigate how individual and perceived group values interact and predict pro-environmental attitudes and behaviours. Participants generally perceived fellow group members to endorse biospheric values less than themselves. Strengthening biospheric group values can motivate individuals’ pro-environmental attitudes and behaviours.

Thijs Bouman

Social Scientist. Postdoc. Department of Social Psychology. University of Groningen. Groningen. The Netherlands

221/1378 How personal experiences with gender discrimination affect Queen Bee behaviour

Complementing past research showing that discriminatory environments can elicit Queen Bee behaviours, we present a study suggesting that recalling personal experiences with gender discrimination is associated with lower endorsement of Queen Bee behaviour.

Lúcia Ferreira

Ph.D. student. Centro de Investigação e Intervenção Social - Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (CIS/ ISCTE-IUL). Lisbon, Portugal

Manuela Barreto

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter, UK.

Andrew Livingstone

Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter, UK.

221/1379 Measurement of Subjective Political Openness: Validation and configuration as a bifactor model in two contexts.

A scale to assess the perceived levels of acceptance of protests in a political context (SPO) was developed and validated cross-culturally. SPO is a multidimensional construct which measures perceptions of government attitudes and police behaviour in relation to protests.

Patricio Saavedra Morales

Psychologist. PhD student. University of Sussex. Brighton. The United Kingdom

John Drury

Psychologist. Reader in Psychology. University of Sussex. Brighton. The United Kingdom

221/1404 Narcissus in the workplace: Is narcissism related to dysfunctional team behaviour and poor organisational outcomes?

Due to high levels of narcissistic rivalry, narcissists are likely to disrupt cohesion and increase conflict within teams. We examined how adaptive and maladaptive narcissists are likely to differ on team behaviours, and how these influence organisational outcomes.

Reece Bush

PhD Student. Centre for Research on Self and Identity. UNIVERSITY OF Southampton. England. United Kingdom.

Claire Hart

Lecturer. Centre for Research on Self and Identity. UNIVERSITY OF Southampton. England. United Kingdom.

Sylwia Cisek

Lecturer. Centre for Research on Self and Identity. UNIVERSITY OF Southampton. England. United Kingdom.

Constantine Sedikides

Professor. Centre for Research on Self and Identity. UNIVERSITY OF Southampton. England. United Kingdom.

221/1460 Do I Really Feel Your Pain? Comparing the Effects of Observed and Personal Ostracism

In two studies we showed that observed ostracism induces slightly less need threat than personal ostracism, but they do not differ regarding mood. Comparably, observed (vs. personal) inclusion induces less need satisfaction, but both have the same effect on mood.

Anna Giesen

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Münster, Germany

Gerald Echterhoff

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, University of Münster, Germany

221/1465 Leaders as attachment figures in groups and organizations

The aim of this research is to develop a scale to assess the strength of attachment bonds between subordinates and leaders. We found evidence of reliability and validity for the scale.

Fernando Molero

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. School of Psychology. UNED. Madrid. España

Juan Antonio Moriano

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. UNED. Madrid. España

Phillip R. Shaver

Psychologist. Professor. University of California-Davis. USA

Mario Mikulincer

Psychologist. Professor. IDC Herzliya. Israel

221/1470 Bad but unblameable? The effect of stigma controllability on evaluations of transgressive leaders

This study examined the effect of stigma controllability on the evaluations of transgressive leaders. Leaders with uncontrollable stigma received more positive evaluations. This effect was mediated by lower levels of perceived prototypically and higher levels of guilt.

Ioanna Kapantai

canterbury

Dominic Abrams

Prof. of Psychology at the University of Kent

221/1476 Understanding psychosocial factors improves efficiency and psychological outcomes during mass decontamination

The effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment was examined. Providing health-focused explanations about decontamination alongside practical information reduced non-compliance and confusion and resulted in the greatest decontamination efficiency.

Holly Carter

Public Health England. Porton Down, UK.

John Drury

University of Sussex, UK

Richard Amlot

Public Health England

G. James Rubin

Kings College London, UK

Richard Williams

University of South Wales, UK

221/1494 All that I am: Self categorisation as homeless and the consequences for aspirations, self-stereotyping, and well-being in homeless service users

The current study experimentally investigated the effects of having to self-categorise as homeless on future life aspirations, and self-stereotyping and the process through which category salience becomes consequential for well-being.

Zoe Walter

Psychologist. Institute for Social Science Research. University of Queensland

Jolanda Jetten

University of Queensland, Australia

Genevieve Dingle

Senior lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Queensland.

221/1495 The influence of groups and alcohol consumption on risky behaviour

The study examined the influence of group versus isolated contexts, and 0.5-6g/kg alcohol versus placebo on individual risky behaviour. Group contexts, but not alcohol, increased individual risky behaviour, suggesting that groups have a stronger influence than alcohol on risk-taking.

Marianne Erskine-Shaw

PhD Student. Department of Psychology. Edge Hill University. Ormskirk. UK

Derek Heim

Professor. Department of Psychology. Edge Hill University. Ormskirk. UK

Rebecca Monk

Senior Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Edge Hill University. Ormskirk. UK

Adam Qureshi

Senior Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Edge Hill University. Ormskirk. UK

221/1500 Social Class Measurements: SES, Self-categorization, and Identity

This paper will present two quantitative questionnaire-based studies that test the comparability and combinability of the different social class measurement methods, particularly of the importance of subjective and social class identity assessments.

Lukas M. Horstmeier

Psychologist. School of Psychology. Queen's University Belfast. Belfast. Northern Ireland. United Kingdom.

Laura K. Taylor

Psychologist. Lecturer. School of Psychology. Queen's University Belfast. Northern Ireland. United Kingdom.

Christopher Raymond

Political Scientist. School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics. Queen's University Belfast. Northern Ireland. United Kingdom.

221/1541 The role of close relationships in the development of women empowerment

Offering microfinance services to women aims to strengthen the position of women. However, its effectiveness is questioned. We present two studies combining qualitative and quantitative research suggesting that relational dynamics may hinder women empowerment and discuss theoretical and practical implications.

Marloes Huis

PhD student in Social Psychology, Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Nina Hansen

Associate Professor, Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Sabine Otten

Professor, Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Robert Lensink

Professor, Economics, Econometrics and Finance, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

221/1545 Perceived Humanness of Syrians by Host Society Groups in Turkey

In this research, perceived humanness of Syrians by the disadvantaged (Kurds) and advantaged (Turks) host society groups in Turkey was investigated. Turks compared to Kurds attributed less positive characteristics to Syrians on both human nature and human uniqueness dimensions.

Meral Gezici Yalçın

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Abant Izzet Baysal University. Bolu. Turkey

221/1554 Revisiting the Effects of Leaders’ Gender Identity in Organisations: A Surface Analysis Approach and Mediating Mechanisms.

The relationship between leader’s identification with agentic and communal traits and subordinates’ organisational citizenship behaviour is analysed revealing the mediating effect of servant leadership behaviours. Response surface methodology is used as an innovative approach for studying androgyny and its effects.

Alejandro Amillano

Galdakao

Leire Garztia

Assistant Professor. Department of People Management in Organizations. Deusto Business School. University of Deusto. Bilbao. Spain.

Josune Baniandrés

Associate Professor. Department of People Management in Organizations. Deusto Business School. University of Deusto. Bilbao. Spain.

Christian Tröster

Associate Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior. Kühne Logistics University – The KLU. Hamburg. Germany.

221/1584 Group Members' Evaluations of Cheaters Depend on Prior Prototypicality and Identification

Two studies investigated evaluations of group cheaters. In study 1 (N=99) group members evaluated cheaters less harshly when they when they had high group prototypicality. Study 2 (N=227) found similar results when comparing one vs. many time cheaters.

Jeffrey Ramdass

PhD Student, Department of Psychology, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California

221/1587 Terrorism is Skin Deep: How Crime Shapes Perceived Appearance of White and Arab Suspects

White participants read about a White or Arab suspect found with marijuana or explosives. The crime committed affected participants’ memory of the suspects’ appearance. White suspects were remembered as having a stereotypically Arab appearance when accused of terrorism.

Juliana Manrique

Student, Wesleyan University, Connecticut, USA

Clara Wilkins

Professor. Wesleyan University. Connecticut, USA

Joseph Wellman

Professor. California State San Bernardino. California, USA

221/1603 Beyond Reconciliation: The Nostalgia of Combatant Identity in the Reintegration Process in Colombia.

Psychosocial factors that hinder re-identification with the civilian community for demobilized combatants in Colombia are explored (N=201). Results highlight the loss of status and social rejection that increase nostalgia for the armed group and risk of recidivism.

Odile Cuénoud González

Social Psychologist. PhD candidate. Institute of Psychology. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland

Alain Clémence

Social Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland

221/1701 No drought about it? The influence of personal experience on views of climate change

Californians (n = 77) were interviewed regarding their experience of the drought in late 2015. Largely, participants interpreted the drought according to their existing beliefs about climate change and did not say that the drought changed their mind.

Sarah Becker

PhD student, Psychology, University of Sussex, UK

Paul Sparks

Senior Lecturer, Psychology, University of Sussex, UK

221/15702 Battlegrounds of identity: The case of Indigenous education in Australia

Education, and educational contexts, can serve as battlegrounds for contesting identities between groups that differ in power and status. Historical analyses of Indigenous education demonstrate how this was achieved through variations in the legitimacy, stability and permeability of intergroup boundaries.

Diana Grace

Faculty of Health, Universty of Canberra, Canberra, Australia

Michael Platow

Research School of Psychology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

221/15703 STEM faculty’s mindsets as a cue to social identity threat for women

Two experiments and a longitudinal, experience-sampling study examined how students’ perceptions of college instructors’ mindsets shape women’s STEM experiences. Results revealed that fixed faculty mindsets reduce performance and increase experiences of identity threat for women in their actual college classes.

Mary Murphy

Department of Psychology and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA

Julie Garcia

California Polytechnic State University, California, USA,

Sabrina Zirkel

Santa Clara University, California, USA

221/15704 Social identification and normative conflict: when student and educator learning norms collide

The current paper explores the influence of perceived norm conflict and social identification on behaviour in the applied context of education. Testing two samples of Australian undergraduate students, this paper explores how students resolve conflict between two intragroup norm sources.

Lillian Smyth

ANU Medical School, Australian National Univrsity, Canberra, Australia

Vritika Chandra

Research School of Psychology, Australian National Univeristy, Canberra, Australia

Brendan Dwyer

Research School of Psychology, Australian National Univeristy, Canberra, Australia

Kenneth Mavor

School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom

221/15705 Postgraduate led academic skills project: Evaluating a normative intervention for learning approach and discipline identity

We use a quasi-experimental evaluation of a postgraduate-led academic skills program to examine a peer-norm intervention to increase deep learning, and engagement with an academic discipline. The workshops significantly impacted on perceptions of peer norms, and reported deep learning.

Kenneth Mavor

School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom

Eilidh Harris

Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development, University of St Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom

Catriona Wilson

Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development, University of St Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom

Lillian Smyth

ANU Medical School, Australian National Univrsity, Canberra, Australia

Interpersonal Relations

221/1346 Relationship Satisfaction among Diverse Women: Importance of Communication and Equity

This study investigated relationship satisfaction among partnered/married women. Results suggested more satisfaction if partners listened or women perceived little conflict in balancing employment/family life. Relationship satisfaction predicted health. Implications include health consequences in relationships perceived as unfair or lacking communication.

Ekeoma Uzogara

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

221/1358 Do outgroup teachers enhance or diminish academic outcomes of stereotyped students relative to ingroup teachers?

A common assumption is that outgroup teachers would diminish academic outcomes of students from stereotyped backgrounds. Here we tested a novel way of subverting this negative trend by combining insights from the Stereotype Content Model and the Stereotype Inoculation Model.

Jaya Kumar Karunagharan

PhD in Psychology Candidate. School of Psychology. University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus. Semenyih. Malaysia.

Chuma Owuamalam

Assistant Professor. School of Psychology. University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus. Semenyih. Malaysia.

221/1383 How parents react to the grandparents-grandchild relationship: Support or resistance

We interviewed 14 mothers and grandmothers in this study. Gate keeping and inter-generational solidarity theories were used as the theoretical framework. Both grandmothers and mothers view the grandparents-grandchild relationship as natural-born kinship, which does not need to be manipulated.

Fu-Mei Chen

Chair/ Associate professor, Department of Child and Family Studies, Fu-Jen University, Taipei, Taiwan

221/1398 Interpersonal dynamics behind authentic and hubristic pride from the perspective of merited and unmerited success

The Two-facet Model of pride and the Merited success/Unmerited Display Model can be merged if we consider subjective social status. Results from 552 participants showed that being respected by others determines status maintenance strategies and related facets of pride.

Henrietta Bolló

Psychologist, Doctoral School of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

Beáta Bőthe

Psycholgist, Doctoral School of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

István Tóth-Király

Psycholgist, Doctoral School of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

Gábor Orosz

Psychologist, Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary; Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

221/1409 Inaccurate Estimates of Positive Outcomes in Principal-Agent Relationships

How do principals react to different outcome estimates by agents when probabilities are known or not known? We investigated this question in three vignette studies, which demonstrated that agents who were trusted most, did not automatically receive high choice ratings.

Hilmar Brohmer

PhD student, Institute of Psychology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria

Anthony M. Evans

Department of Social Psychology, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands

221/1419 Couple conflict is cultural: Emotional behaviors during conflict situations in romantic couples from Belgium and Japan

In an interaction study with 137 romantic couples from Belgium and Japan, we found that the patterns of emotional behaviors during conflict differed systematically across cultures as a function of the prevalent concerns in social relationships (autonomy vs relatedness).

Alexander Kirchner

Doctoral Student. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven, Belgium.

Michael Boiger

Post-Doctoral Researcher. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven, Belgium.

Yukiko Uchida

Associate Professor. Kokoro Research Center. Kyoto University. Kyoto, Japan.

Batja Mesquita

Professor. Center for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven, Belgium.

221/1423 On the Link Between Benevolent Sexism and Orgasm Frequency in Heterosexual Women

We hypothesized that women’s endorsement of a benevolently sexist worldview would be negatively associated with orgasm frequency. We found support for our model across two studies. We did not, however, find a direct effect of benevolent sexism on orgasm frequency.

Emily Harris

Psychologist. PhD Student. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Australia.

Fiona Kate Barlow

Psychologist. Dr. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Australia.

Matthew Hornsey

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/1427 Buffering against the aversive effects of exclusion with situational social acceptance : a one way avenue

We sought to verify whether excluded individuals could benefit from taking part in a experience of social inclusion before or after the exclusion happened, using the standard Cyberball paradigm and a Überball condition.

Vanessa Simard

Graduate student. University of Quebec in Montreal. Quebec. Canada

Stéphane Dandeneau

Researcher. Professor. University of Quebec in Montreal. Quebec. Canada

221/1440 Mate Choice Copying in Humans

Mate choice copying involves using another’s relationship status as basis for one’s own choices. This study found that ratings of men’s perceived attractiveness were influenced by their relationship status - detected through differences in facial features.

Maureen Erber

Professor of Psychology, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Ralph Erber

Professor of Psychology, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA

221/1449 Masculine norms, domestic violence attitudes, and the role of objectification

Previous research connects masculine norms to domestic violence attitudes. Objectification is proposed as a mediator. In two studies, we demonstrate the mediating effect of objectification between masculine norms and attitudes supporting domestic violence.

Michelle Stratemeyer

Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia

Nick Haslam

Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia

221/1478 Consensual sexual nonmonogamy, extradyadic sex, and relationship satisfaction

We examined whether consensual sexually non-monogamous relationships moderate the association between sociosexuality and relationship satisfaction in a sample of heterosexuals using a dating website. Results showed a negative association between sociosexuality and satisfaction, yet moderated by sexual agreement: while monogamous relationships showed this negative association, it was positive for non-monogamous relationships

Diniz Lopes

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. ISCTE-IUL. Lisbon. Portugal.

David Rodrigues

Psychologist. Reseacrher. CIS-IUL, ISCTE-IUL. Lisbon. Portugal.

Marco Pereira

Psychologist. Researcher. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra. Lisbon. Portugal

221/1481 Does hunger make people selfish and distrustful?

Two experiments were conducted, using experimental manipulations of hunger and tasks from behavioral economics. As a consistent pattern of results over both studies and over different tasks, hunger does not make people generally more selfish and distrustful.

Jan Häusser

Psychologist. Professor. Jutus-Liebig-University Giessen. Germany

Nadira Faber

University of Oxford. United Kingdom.

Andreas Mojzisch

University of Hildesheim. Germany.

Johannes Leder

University of Bamberg. Germany.

Paul Van Lange

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/1484 On being forgotten: the consequences of memory and forgetting depend on relationship closeness

Being forgotten by other people is common and has important interpersonal consequences. The present work shows that who does the forgetting matters. The outcomes of memory and forgetting are determined by relationship closeness.

Andrei Iulian Pintea

Psychology PhD student. School of Psychology. University of Aberdeen. Aberdeen. United Kingdom

Devin Ray

Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Aberdeen. Aberdeen. United Kingdom

Sarah Gomillion

Visiting scholar. Department of Psychology. The University of Texas at Austin. Austin, Texas. U.S.

221/1512 Manipulation of Obedience with Non-invasive Brain Stimulation

Employing non-invasive brain stimulation, we show that the right lateral prefrontal cortex is causally linked to adapting social behaviour, enabling to transcend ‘mindless’ rule obedience when necessary and, thus, unveil a neurobiological basis of civil disobedience.

Franziska Emmerling

Psychologist.Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. UK.

Jörg Gross

Psychologist. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Alexander T. Sack

Psychologist. Department of Cognitive Neuroscince. Maastricht University. The Netherlands.

221/1518 Promoting interpersonal trust among strangers through a feeling of protection enhanced by trustworthy institutions

Convergent across a survey (Study 1) and an experiment (Study 2), results supported the hypothesis that when institutions are perceived as trustworthy, they serve a self-protective motive, which in turn allows individuals to accept vulnerability and, thus, trust others.

Giuliana Spadaro

PhD student. University of Turin. Turin. Italy

Katharina Gangl

Mag. Dr. Zeppelin University. Friedrichshafen. Germany

Cristina Onesta Mosso

Psychologist. Professor. University of Turin. Turin. Italy.

221/1549 Magical bonds keep us close: The effect of loneliness on magical thinking about inanimate objects associated with one’s romantic partner

Sympathetic magic (SM) describes perception of inanimate objects associated with a partner as containing some of his/her qualities. However, prior studies showed that SM regulated perceived closeness to a partner, there is a noticeable lack of research on whether separation from a loved one increases SM. This research provides the evidence that forced separation from a partner that was either imagined (Study 1) or measured as a real-life situation (Study 2) increased SM in perception of inanimate objects associated with a partner.

Aleksandra Niemyjska

Psychologist, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities

221/1556 Seeing Beyond Political Affiliations: The Importance of Moral Foundations

Participants rated the favorability and moral foundations of a facebook profile that shared a political article ( conservative, democrat, pro-Trump, or pro-Clinton). Targets were rated more favorably when they were seen as sharing moral foundations with participants, not just political leanings.

Kathryn Bruchmann

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA

Birgit Koopmann-Holm

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA

Makeda Adisu

Undergraduate Student, Department of Psychology, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA

Kimberly Garcia

Undergraduate Student, Department of Psychology, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA

Aaron Scherer

Associate of Internal Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA

Self and Identity

221/1296 The real me in real-time: The structure and momentary correlates of state authenticity

Present research examined the structure and the key psychological correlates of state authenticity (mood, ideal self, self-esteem, self-consciousness, need satisfaction, the motivation to be “real,” and flow) using the day reconstruction method and a smartphone app that collected live data.

Letitia Slabu

Senior Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Middlesex University. London. UK

Alison Lenton

Visiting Research Fellow. Center for Research on Self and Identity. Department of Psychology. University of Southampton. Southampton. UK

Constantine Sedikides

Center for Research on Self and Identity. Department of Psychology. University of Southampton. Southampton. UK

221/1321 Do Narcissists use Social Support as a Coping Strategy in Times of Stress?

Due to their high agency and low communion, narcissists challenge the link between social support and coping with stress. We examined whether and why adaptive and maladaptive narcissists seek support and if source of stress is important.

Karlien Paas

PhD-Student, Centre for Research on Self and Identity, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom

Claire Hart

Lecturer, Centre for Research on Self and Identity, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom

Erica Hepper

Lecturer, School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom

Constantine Sedikides

Professor, Centre for Research on Self and Identity, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom

221/1325 Attachment style as an organizing construct of self-definition and closeness: the role of emotional affiliative cues.

Starting from the fact that avoidant individuals are more motivated to keep distance from partner, we test the hypothesis that Avoidant attachment has an indirect effect on closeness through self-construal which is moderated by levels of affiliative cues.

Silvia Mazzuca

Dept. Social Psyhcology, University of Rome, Sapienza.

Fabio Presaghi

Ph.D. Dept. Social Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.

Konstantinos Kafetsios

Associate Prof. Dept. of Psychology, University of Crete, Rethymno, Greece.

221/1345 Relationships Between Abstract Style of Thinking, Cross-Situational Consistency in Self-Concept and Self-Control Abstract

Two Studies (N=725 and N=244) supported the relationship between abstractness and cross-situational consistency and showed that both dimensions correlated with dispositional self-control: a higher abstractness, higher consistency and higher self-control.

ITZIAR FERNANDEZ

UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE EDUCACION A DISTANCIA , UNED

Amparo Caballero

UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE MADRID, ESPAÑA

Dolores Muñoz

UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE MADRID

Pilar Carrera

UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE MADRID

221/1371 Discussing and displaying NSSI online: Maintaining ‘authentic’ self-injuring identities online

This study examines how contributors to an online NSSI site maintain authentic self-injuring identities, while deviating from a core aspect of such identities by publically displaying their ‘secret’ behaviour. Findings indicate that online anonymity is key to this process.

Jeff Gavin

Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Bath, UK

Karen Rodham

Professor, School of Psychology, Sport and Exercise, Staffordshire University, UK

Stephen Lewis

Associate Professor, Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Peter Bandalli

PhD Graduate, Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, UK

Jill St Denis

Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

221/1401 Home is where you hang your hat: Current town identity, but not hometown identity, protects against stress-related mental health symptoms

We assess whether social identification mitigates against the effects of financial stress. The mediated effect of financial stress on mental health symptoms via self-esteem was attenuated by social identification. This was limited to identification with one’s current place of residence.

Anam Elahi

PhD student. Institute oh Psychology, Health and Society. University of Liverpool. Liverpool. England.

Jason McIntyre

Postdoctoral Researcher. Institute of Psychology, Health and Society. University of Liverpool. Liverpool. England.

Sitko Kasia

PhD student. Institute of Psychology, Health and Society. University of Liverpool. Liverpool. England.

Hannah Bodycote

Postgraduate masters Student. Institute of Psychology, Health and Society. University of Liverpool. Liverpool. England.

Charlotte Hampson

Postgraduate masters Student. Institute of Psychology, Health and Society. University of Liverpool. Liverpool. England.

Richard Bentall

Professor. Institute of Psychology, Health and Society. University of Liverpool. Liverpool. England.

221/1421 The moderating role self-compassion in associations between self-criticism and psychological well-being

This research examined the potential moderating role of self-compassion in associations between self-criticism and depression and self-esteem. It was found that greater self-criticism was associated with greater depression and lower self-esteem only for those individuals low in self-compassion.

Daniel Weidler

Senior Lecturer. Department of Psychological Sciences. Northern Arizona University. Flagstaff, Arizona, United States.

Alyssa Billington

Graduate Student. Department of Psychological Sciences. Northern Arizona University. Flagstaff, Arizona, United States.

221/1422 Leader Group Prototypicality and Leadership Effectiveness in the Context of Political Parties in Turkey: Examining The Moderating Roles of Right-Wing Authoritarianism and Social Dominance Orientation

This study which included 581 participants of university students indicates that RWA and SDO may have moderating effects on the relationship between political party leaders' group prototypicality and their perceived leadership effectiveness. Political party preferences, however, seem to have an important role for these effects.

Mediha Omur

Psychologist. Lecturer. Hasan Kalyoncu University. Gaziantep. Turkey.

221/1424 Multicultural identity configurations and wellbeing: Implications from normative cultural conflict resolution strategies and academic stage.

Two studies show that normative cultural conflict resolution strategies (active vs. agreeable) mediate the relationships between multicultural identity configurations (identity integration, compartmentalization) and wellbeing. Study 2 reveals that identity integration and wellbeing’s relationship is also moderated by academic development stage.

Melisa Arias-Valenzuela

Ph.D. student in Psychology (scientific-professional profile). Département de Psychologie. Université du Québec à Montréal. Montreal. Canada.

Catherine Amiot

Professor. Département de Psychologie. Université du Québec à Montréal. Montreal. Canada.

Andrew G. Ryder

Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Concordia University. Montreal. Canada.

221/1445 When do social identities enhance vitality and self-esteem?: Political and religious identity change and stability

Analyses of Americans’ sustained versus changing political affiliations (N=228) and religious faiths (N=225) revealed: 1) changes were relatively common; 2) converts had greater group-directed negative emotions and disidentification; but also 3) political converts had greater personal self-esteem and vitality.

Winnifred Louis

Associate Professor. School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Australia

Gi Chonu

PhD candidate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Australia

S. Alexander Haslam

School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/1458 Overeating May Influence Movie Choice: Restoring Gender Identity When Threatened by Food Consumption

The present study showed that an overeating experience is perceived by women as a negative and threatening experience, which leads them to restore their gender identity by engaging in a stereotypically feminine activity, such as watching a romance movie.

Anna Rita Graziani

Psychologist. Assistant professor. Department of Communication and Economics. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Reggio Emilia. Italy

Nicoletta Cavazza

Associate Professor. Department of Communication and Economics. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Reggio Emilia. Italy

Margherita Guidetti

Postdoctoral researcher. Department of Communication and Economics. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Reggio Emilia. Italy

221/1471 “Make your choice, I’ll tell your social class”: Social-class specific models of agency

By successfully replicating results from Stephens, Markus and Townsend (2007) in another western culture (France), this study provides additional support for the existence of social class-based models of self and agency that guide our everyday thoughts, feelings and actions.

Medhi Marot

Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage, Université de Poitiers

Jean-Claude Croizet

221/1477 Materialism as a means of narcissistic self-regulation

Materialistic tendencies and their effect on well-being in grandiose and vulnerable narcissists were studied. Both types of narcissism were positively associated with materialism. Low avoidance motivation partially mediated the positive correlation between grandiose narcissism and materialism, whereas high self-doubt partially mediated the positive correlation with vulnerable narcissism.

Stephanie Hanke

Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ruhr University Bochum. Bochum. Germany.

221/1558 Self-construals and their association with affective functioning and wellbeing

Correlational and regression analyses of frequencies and rank order of micro- and macro-categories coding participants' (N=531) “Who am I ?” responses showed that several Reflexive and Social self categories were significantly associated with, and predicted, affective functioning and wellbeing.

Vanda Zammuner

Professor, Department of development and socialization (DPSS), University of Padova

Chiara Verzelletti

Grant holder, DPSS, University of Padova

Silvia Vighi

Graduate Student, DPSS, University of Padova

221/1567 The Thin Line between Self and Others: Interpersonal Multisensory Stimulation may change self-identity and self-other perception

The present studies show that Interpersonal Multisensory Stimulation may induce self-other merging by changing the neural representation of the self (to include the synchronously stimulated other), depending on how participants define the self as interdependent from others (self construal).

Ilaria Bufalari

Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology of Developmental and Socialization Processes. Sapienza University of Rome. Rome. Italy

Giuseppina Porciello

Post Doc Researcher. Department of Psychology. Sapienza University of Rome. Rome. Italy.

Lucia Mannetti

Full Professor. Department of Developmental and Socialisation Processes. Sapienza University of Rome. Rome. Italy.

221/1574 Social identity salience and the narrative organization of group history

The aim of our research was to uncover the connection between the level of national identification and the narrative structure of group history. It has been found that the more identified the person is, the more complex narrative is provided.

Tibor Polya

Psychologist: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Budapets, Hungary.

19.30 - 20.30 h. Horizon Talk: Inequality: The Enemy Between Us?

Room: Manuel Falla

Speaker:

Richard Wilkinson

Professor Emeritus of Social Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham Medical School, Honorary Professor at University College London and Visiting Professor at the University of York.

Richard Wilkinson will start by summarising the evidence that most of the health and social problems which occur more frequently lower down the social ladder become more common in most income groups in countries with larger income differences between rich and poor. He will then discuss the causal processes which centre on our human sensitivity to social status differentiation and its effects on social relations. Particularly important here is the recent evidence on the higher prevalence of psychopathologies involving the dominance behavioural system in more unequal societies.

20.30 - 21.30 h. Football Match

21.30 - 23.30 h. Guided night visit to the oldest part of the city including the Muslim quarter

Friday 7 July

9.00 - 10.40 h. Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions IX

221/40 - Social Psychology and Refugees

Room: Manuel Falla

Issues arising from current mass migrations of refugees demand our attention as social psychologists. This symposium offers a snap-shot of European social-psychological research on refugees, featuring work in four different contexts with a variety of methods.

Chair:

Rupert Brown

Social Psychologist. School of Psychology. Sussex University. Brighton. United Kingdom.

221/4001 European research on immigration

A survey of existing psychological work related to understanding and delivering support in the current migration of refugees outlines substantial contributions. However, it also points to open theoretical and practical problems which urgently need to be solved.

Uli Wagner

Social Psychologist; Psychology; Marburg University; Marburg; Germany

Simon Greipl

Psychologist; Marburg University; Marburg; Germany

221/4002 Psychosocial support among Syrian refugees in Jordan: An ethnographic exploration of the role of social identity