Symposia: Presentations XIII

Saturday 8 July
14.30 - 16.10 h.
 

 

221/204 - The powerful influence of social norms in intergroup relations

Room: Manuel Falla

Prejudice reduction interventions are largely ineffective. The speakers demonstrate one reason why: Intergroup behavior is guided by descriptive norms – people's beliefs about what their peers think. The reported findings provide groundwork for developing effective interventions to improve intergroup relations.

Chair
Markus Brauer
Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Madison WI. USA.

221/20401 Can large-scale interventions foster social integration and encourage social change?

(1) Reimer, Nils Karl; (2) Benz, Angelika; (3) Schmid, Katharina; (4) Hewstone, Miles

(1) Psychologist. Deptartment of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK.; (2) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK.; (3) Psychologist. ESADE Business School. Ramon Llull University. Barcelona. Spain.; (4) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK.

221/20402 Third party prejudice as a driver of hiring discrimination

(1) Vial, Andrea; (2) Brescoll, Victoria L.; (3) Dovidio, John F.

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Yale University. New Haven CT. USA.; (2) Psychologist, School of Management. Yale University. New Haven. CT. USA.; (3) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Yale University. New Haven CT. USA.

221/20403 Creating inclusive climates with descriptive norms messaging

(1) Brauer, Markus; (2) Murrar, Sohad

(1) Psychologist. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Madison WI. USA.; (2) Psychologist. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Madison WI. USA.

221/20404 Context matters (especially when you are older): Group norms and the development of resource allocation.

(1) McGuire, Luke; (2) Rizzo, Michael T.; (3) Killen, Melanie; (4) Manstead, Anthony; (5) Rutland, Adam

(1) Psychologist. Goldsmiths. University of London. UK.; (2) Psychologist. College of Education. University of Maryland. College Park MD. USA; (3) Psychologist. College of Education. University of Maryland. College Park MD. USA; (4) Psychologist. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK; (5) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of London. UK

221/20405 Ingroup entitativity licenses outgroup prejudice: The role of collective responsibility judgments

(1) Effron, Daniel; (2) Knowles, Eric D.

(1) Psychologist. London Business School. London. UK.; (2) Psychologist. New York University. New York NY. USA

221/108 - A New Look at Attitude Change: Thought Validation, Depletion, Individual Differences and training as Antecedents

Room: Machuca

This symposium introduces novel approaches to attitude change and their implications. Five talks will present research showing how attitude change is facilitated by processes of (a) thought validation, (b) self-control, (c) affective and cognitive individual differences and (d) behavioral responses.

Chair
Guy Itzchakov
Graduate student. University Of Haifa. Haifa. Israel.

221/10801 Matching Violent Videogames and Trait Aggressiveness: A Self-Validation Perspective

(1) Santos, David; (2) Cárdaba, Miguel A.M; (3) Briñol, Pablo; (4) Petty, Richard E

(1) Graduate student. Department of Psychology. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid. Spain; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. Centro Universitario Villanueva. Madrid. Spain; (3) Professor. Department of Psychology. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid. Spain; (4) Professor. Department of Psychology. Ohio State University. Columbus. Ohio

221/10802 Attitude Change as a Function of the Number of Words in which Thoughts Are Expressed

(1) Gandarillas, Beatriz; (2) Briñol, Pablo; (3) Petty, Richard E; (4) Dario, Díaz

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology. Universidad Francisco de Vitoria. Madrid. Spain; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid. Spain; (3) Professor. Department of Psychology. Ohio State University. Columbus. Ohio; (4) Professor. Department of Psychology.Universidad de Castilla La Mancha. Albacete.Spain

221/10803 Ego depletion breaks attitude-behavior association

(1) Itzchakov, Guy; (2) Uziel, Liad

(1) Graduate student. University of Haifa.Haifa. Israel; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. Bar-Ilan University. Ramat-Gan.Israel

221/10804 Affective and Cognitive Orientations in Intergroup Perception

(1) Wolf, Lukas J; (2) Maio, Gregory R; (3) von Hecker, Ulrich

(1) Postdoctoral Researcher. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. Wales; (2) Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. Wales; (3) Professor.School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. Wales

221/10805 Training Your Unhealthy Preferences Away? Changing Evaluations Towards Food by Employing Training Procedures

(1) Holland, Rob; (2) Cehn, Zhang; (3) Becker, Daniela; (4) Jostmann, Niels; (5) Wiers, Reinout; (6) Dijksterhuis, Ap; (7) Veling, Harm

(1) Professor.Department of Social Psychology Radboud University, University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (2) Graduate Student. Department of Social Psychology Radboud University. The Netherlands; (3) Graduate student.Department of Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (4) Professor.Department of Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (5) Professor.Department of Developmental Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (6) Professor. Behavioral Science Institute. Radboud University. The Netherlands.; (7) Professor. Behavioral Science Institute. Radboud University. The Netherlands.

221/222 - Fiction and Social Cognition

Room: Machado

We learn about others and how to learn about others through everyday encounters. These skills are also developed and refined through engagement with fictional worlds. From the capacity to read others, to the development of attitudes, fiction impacts social cognition.

Chair
Emanuele Castano
Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. New School for Social Research. New York (NY). United States.

221/22201 Patterns of mindreading unique to fiction

(1) Zunshine, Lisa

(1) Bush-Holbrook Professor of English. University of Kentucky. Lexington, KY. United States.

221/22202 Reading literary fiction improves theory of mind: A replication and extension to the moral domain

(1) Kidd, David Comer; (2) Castano, Emanuele

(1) Postdoctoral Fellow. Department of Psychology. New School for Social Research. New York (NY). United States & Associate Director of Research in Action. Humanities and Liberal Arts Assessment lab. Harvard University. Cambridge (MA). United States.; (2) Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. New School for Social Research. New York (NY). United States.

221/22203 Linguistic markers associated with complex representations of others’ mental states: Reflective function in literary fiction

(1) Ongis, Martino; (2) Kidd, David Comer; (3) Castano, Emanuele

(1) PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. New School for Social Research. New York (NY). United States.; (2) Postdoctoral Fellow. Department of Psychology. New School for Social Research. New York (NY). United States & Associate Director of Research in Action. Humanities and Liberal Arts Assessment lab. Harvard University. Cambridge (MA). United States.; (3) Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. New School for Social Research. New York (NY). United States.

221/22204 Emotions and the persuasion through fictional stories

(1) Appel, Markus; (2) Schreiner, Constanze

(1) Professor. Psychology Department. University of Koblenz-Landau. Germany.; (2) Research Assosicate and Doctoral Student at IKM. University Koblenz-Landau. Germany

221/22205 Exercising social cognition through fiction

(1) Fiske, Susan T.

(1) Social psychologist. Department of Psychology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.

221/135 - How to make diversity work? Majority and minority perspectives on intergroup contact, equality, and trust

Room: Picasso

This symposium investigates how diversity and intergroup contact relate to ingroup and intergroup outcomes. We examine majority and minority perspectives on equality, diversity norms and trust. We highlight the role of norms and policies at the macro and meso level.

Chair
Judit Kende
Psychologist. Centre for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/13501 When institutional support shapes the prejudice-reducing effect of intergroup contact: a 20-country multilevel study

(1) G.T. Green, Eva; (2) Visintin, Emilio Paolo; (3) Sarrasin, Oriane; (4) Hewstone, Miles

(1) Psychologist. Faculty of Social and Political Sciences. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland; (2) Psychologist. Faculty of Social and Political Sciences. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland; (3) Psychologist. Faculty of Social and Political Sciences. University of Lausanne. Lausanne. Switzerland; (4) Psychologist. Oxford Centre for the Study of Intergroup Conflict. University of Oxford. Oxford. United Kingdom

221/13502 Extending Trust to Immigrants: Generalized trust, Cross-Group Friendship and Anti-Immigrant Sentiments in 21 European Societies

(1) van der Linden, Meta; (2) Hooghe, Marc; (3) de Vroome, Thomas; (4) van Laar, Colette

(1) Psychologist.Centre for Political Science Research. Faculty of Social Sciences. University of Leuven. Leuven, Belgium; (2) Political Scientist. Centre for Political Science Research. Faculty of Social Sciences. University of Leuven. Leuven, Belgium; (3) Social Scientist. European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands; (4) Psychologist. Centre for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/13503 Consequences of three interethnic school mergers on intergroup attitudes, psychological wellbeing and educational aspirations

(1) Schmid, Katharina; (2) Hewstone, Miles

(1) Psychologist. ESADE Business School, Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain; (2) Psychologist. Oxford Centre for the Study of Intergroup Conflict. University of Oxford. Oxford. United Kingdom

221/13504 Building social cohesion in ethnically diverse communities

(1) J. Reynolds, Katherine; (2) M. Jones, Benjamin; (3) Klik, Kathleen; (4) Batalha, Luisa; (5) Subasic, Emina

(1) Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia.; (2) Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia.; (3) Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia.; (4) Psychologist. School of Psychology NSW. Australian Catholic University. Strathfield. Australia; (5) Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Newcastle. Callaghan. Australia

221/13505 Majority group belonging without minority group distancing? The interplay of majority friendship and perceived inequality

(1) Judit, Kende; (2) Baysu, Gülseli; (3) Phalet, Karen; (4) Colette, van Laar

(1) Psychologist. Centre for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium; (2) Psychologist. Kadir Has University. Istanbul. Turkey; (3) Psychologist. Centre for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium; (4) Psychologist. Centre for Social and Cultural Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/86 - Social status and power alter sensitivity to others and the self

Room: Dinner 1

Individuals’ social status and power influence how much they attend to others and themselves and whether other people pay attention to them. This symposium includes four talks that present boundary conditions to these effects and consequences for decision-making and judgment.

Chair
Petra Schmid
Psychologist. Department of Management, Technology, and Economics. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). Zurich. Switzerland.

221/8601 How social rank shapes visual processing

(1) Gobel, Matthias S; (2) Bullock, Tom; (3) Richardson, Daniel C; (4) Kim, Heejung; (5) Giesbrecht, Barry

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Sage Center for the Study of the Mind. University of California at Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara. USA; (2) Psychologist. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. University of California at Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara. USA; (3) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University College London. London. UK; (4) Psychologist. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. University of California at Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara. USA; (5) Psychologist. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. University of California at Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara. USA

221/8602 Social class and the motivational relevance of other human beings: Evidence from visual attention

(1) Dietze, Pia; (2) Knowles, Eric

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA.; (2) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA.

221/8603 Powerlessness impedes the processing and recognition of faces

(1) Schmid, Petra; (2) Amodio, David M

(1) Psychologist. Department of Management, Technology, and Economics. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). Zurich. Switzerland; (2) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA.

221/8604 Social power increases reliance on experiential information: the case of motor fluency

(1) Woltin, Karl-Andrew; (2) Guinote, Ana

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Roehampton. London. UK.; (2) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University College London. London. UK

221/64 - What is inaction? Challenging existing interpretations of the meaning of (collective) action and inaction.

Room: Dinner 2

Many fields in psychology focus on action versus inaction (e.g., stress-coping, collective action, motivation literatures). The present symposium brings together different theoretical perspectives on action versus inaction and (re)considers the meaning of inaction.

Chair
Katherine Stroebe
Associate Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Groningen. Netherlands.

221/6401 Communication and Thought about Inaction

(1) Albarracin, Dolores

(1) Prof. Dolores Albarracin, Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, United States

221/6402 A disaster unfolding: The meaning of ‘inaction’ in response to collective injustice

(1) Stroebe, Katherine; (2) Postmes, Tom; (3) Roos, Carla

(1) Associate Professor, Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; (2) Professor, social psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, NL; (3) Research master student, Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, NL

221/6403 Predictors and correlates of political inaction

(1) Becker, Julia

(1) Professor, Social Psychology, University of Osnabrueck, Osnabrueck, Germany

221/6404 Position and manoeuvre: Understanding ‘inaction’ by disadvantaged groups as psychological resistance

(1) Livingstone, Andrew; (2) Leach, Colin W.

(1) Senior Lecturer, Social Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK; (2) PhD Department of Psychology University of Connecticut, USA

221/6405 The meaning of inaction: Taking a look at the bigger picture

(1) Leach, Colin W.

(1) Professor, Social Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, US

221/69 - The role of the self-concept in empathy and intergroup relations

Room: Andalucía III

In this symposium, we seek to shed new light on the social dimension of empathy; to zoom in on the conditions that facilitate empathy and determine which features of intergroup relations promote cooperation between groups, rather than conflict.

Chairs
Matt Richins
PhD student in Social Neuroscience. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

Chairs
Federica Meconi
Marie-Curie Research Fellow. School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

221/6901 What divides us brings us together: Establishing the role of synchronous stimulation in social cognition

(1) Paladino, Maria Paola; (2) Mazzurega, Mara; (3) Pavani, Francesco; (4) Lombardi, Luigi

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences. University of Trento. Italy; (2) Post Doc. Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences. University of Trento. Italy; (3) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences. University of Trento. Italy; (4) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences. University of Trento. Italy

221/6902 Humans matter. Neural empathic responses revealed by attribution of humanness.

(1) Meconi, Federica; (2) Vaes, Jeroen; (3) Sessa, Paola

(1) Post Doc Fellow. Department of Developmental and Social Psychology. University of Padova. Italy; (2) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences. University of Trento; (3) Assistant Professor. Department of Developmental and Social Psychology. University of Padova

221/6903 No Pain, to gain: Empathic pain responses are reduced to competitive but not non-competitive outgroups

(1) Richins, Matt; (2) Lawrence, Natalia; (3) Karl, Anke; (4) Barreto, Manuela

(1) PhD student. School of Psychology. University of Exeter. United Kingdom.; (2) Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Exeter. United Kingdom; (3) Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Exeter. United Kingdom; (4) Professor. School of Psychology. University of Exeter. United Kingdom

221/6904 Empathy as a motivator of dyadic cross-group helping: The dis-inhibiting effect of the recipient’s benevolence

(1) Siem, Birte; (2) Lotz-Schmitt, Katharina; (3) Stürmer, Stefan

(1) Lecturer. Department of Social Psychology. University of Hagen. Germany; (2) Lecturer. Department of Social Psychology. University of Hagen. Germany; (3) Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Hagen. Germany

221/6905 The benefits of sharing pain with others

(1) Bastian, Brock

(1) Academic. School of Psychological Sciences. University of Melbourne. Australia

221/160 - Seeing Women as Sex Objects: Innovations and Novel Discoveries in Objectification Research

Room: Andalucía II

This symposium highlights contemporary research on female sexual objectification. It examines perspectives of men as perpetrators and women as targets using novel theories and innovative methodologies within the varied contexts in which objectification occurs.

Chair
Gemma Saez
Psychologist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Psychology. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

221/16001 When does a harassing situation (piropo) increase women’s self-objectification? The role of happiness and empowerment

(1) Moya-Garofano, Alba; (2) L. Megías, Jesús; (3) Rodríguez-Bailón, Rosa; (4) Moya, Miguel

(1) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada. Spain; (2) Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada. Spain; (3) Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada. Spain; (4) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada. Spain

221/16002 Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder: Alcohol myopia and objectification

(1) Riemer, Abigail; (2) Haikalis, Michelle; (3) Franz, Molly; (4) Dodd, Michael; (5) DiLillo, David; (6) Gervais, Sarah

(1) Psychologist. PhD Student. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States; (2) Psychologist. PhD Student. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States; (3) Psychologist. PhD Student. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States; (4) Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States; (5) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States; (6) Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States

221/16003 Objectification in Romantic Relationships: Perpetrator and Target’s Perspectives

(1) Saez, Gemma; (2) Gervais, Sarah; (3) Brock, Rebecca

(1) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Social Psychology, University of Granada. Granada. Spain; (2) Psychologist. Associate Professor. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States; (3) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln. United States

221/16004 Visual objectification: The role of perceiver and target characteristics

(1) Eyssel, Friederike; (2) Szeliga, Agnieszka

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC). University of Bielelefeld. Bielefeld. Germany; (2) Psychologist. University of Bielelefeld. Bielefeld. Germany

221/16005 Discussant

(1) Holland, Elise

(1) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Psychology, University Melbourne. Melbourne. Australia

221/208 - Processes and Consequences of Threat-Related Stereotypes

Room: Seminar

The symposium focuses on the prevalence, underlying processes, and consequences of threat-related stereotyping. Drawing from both real-world and experimental data, it addresses how threat stereotypes affect people, groups and places.

Chair
Iniobong Essien
Psychologist. Department of Psychology. FernUniversität in Hagen. Hagen. Germany.

221/20801 Racialized Physical Space Cues Threat

(1) Bonam, Courtney; (2) James, Drexler

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Illinois Chicago. Chicago. United States.; (2) University of Illinois at Chicago

221/20802 Racial Bias in Police Officer Use of Force: An Analysis of Department of Justice Data

(1) Ma, Debbie; (2) Scott, Kendra; (3) Correll, Joshua; (4) Sadler, Melody

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. California State University Northridge. Northridge. United States.; (2) University of Chicago; (3) University of Colorado at Boulder; (4) San Diego State University

221/20803 Stereotypic Vision: The Role of Perceptual Construal in Shooter Bias

(1) Wittenbrink, Bernd; (2) Correll, Joshua; (3) Crawford, Matthew T.; (4) Sadler, Melody S.

(1) Psychologist. Booth School of Business. University of Chicago. Chicago. United States.; (2) University of Colorado at Boulder; (3) Victoria University of Wellington; (4) San Diego State University

221/20804 The Shooter Bias: Replicating the Classic Effect and Introducing a Novel Paradigm

(1) Essien, Iniobong; (2) Stelter, Marleen; (3) Kalbe, Felix; (4) Köhler, Andreas; (5) Mangels, Jana; (6) Meliß, Stefanie

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. FernUniversität in Hagen. Hagen. Germany.; (2) University of Hamburg; (3) University of Hamburg; (4) University of Hamburg; (5) University of Hamburg; (6) University of Hamburg

221/20805 Approach/avoidance tendencies toward French and North-African first names by participants from French and North-African backgrounds

(1) Muller, Dominique; (2) Rougier, Marine; (3) Courset, Rémi; (4) Smeding, Annique

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Univ. Grenoble Alpes. Grenoble. France.; (2) Univ. Grenoble Alpes; (3) Univ. Grenoble Alpes; (4) Université Savoie Mont Blanc

221/224 - Why context matters: The role of context in implicit cognitions related to substance use

Room: Andalucía I

In this symposium, innovative insight is given into the role of contexts (i.e. substance using social context, task goals and parenting context) in the formation of implicit cognitions and substance use among youth by using experimental and longitudinal studies.

Chair
Helle Larsen
Psychologist. PhD. Institute of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/22401 Context affects attention: Effects of current task goals on attention for alcohol cues

(1) Van Bockstaele, Bram; (2) Godara, Malvika; (3) W. Wiers, Reinout

(1) Psychologist, PhD. Department of Developmental Psychology and Department of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; (2) Psychologist. Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; (3) Psychologist, Professor. Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

221/22402 Automatic parenting and adolescents´ alcohol use

(1) M. Koning, Ina; (2) M. Doornwaard, Suzan; (3) van der Rijst, Vincent; (4) de Houwer, Jan

(1) PhD. Child and Adolescent Studies, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; (2) PhD. Child and Adolescent Studies, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; (3) Behavioural scientist. Child and Adolescent Studies, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; (4) Psychologist, Professor. Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Ghent, Belgium

221/22403 Attention in context: Top-down regulation of “automatic” processes

(1) Spruyt, Adriaan

(1) Ghent University, Belgium

221/22404 Implicit and explicit smoking attitudes related to a contextualized assessment of decision-making

(1) Larsen, Helle; (2) Salemink, Elske; (3) W. Wiers, Reinout; (4) Anderson, Kris

(1) Psychologist, PhD. Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; (2) Psychologist, PhD. Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; (3) Psychologist, Professor. Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; (4) Psychologist, PhD. Department of Psychology, Reed College, United States

221/22405 Discussion

(1) Spruyt, Adriaan

(1) Ghent University, Belgium