Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions X

Friday 7 July
11.10 - 12.50 h.
 

 

221/134 - Identity multiplicity and its outcomes in context: A European comparative perspective

Room: Manuel Falla

This symposium contextualizes identity multiplicity among ethnic minorities in Europe, asking in which intergroup contexts multiple identities are more compatible (paper 1 & 2) and dual identifiers more likely to be high performers (study 3) and politically engaged (study 3).

Chair
Fenella Fleischmann
Associate Professor. Ercomer. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/13401 Identity multiplicity among minority youth: examining conflict vs. compatibility between ethnic, religious and national identity

(1) Fleischmann, Fenella; (2) Leszcsensky, Lars; (3) Pink, Sebastian

(1) Associate Professor, Ercomer, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; (2) Postdoctoral researcher, MZES, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany; (3) PhD researcher, MZES, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany

221/13402 Being a Muslim and a Citizen: Dual Identities of Minority Youth in five European countries

(1) Phalet, Karen; (2) Fleischmann, Fenella

(1) Professor, CSCP, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; (2) Associate Professor, Ercomer, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

221/13403 Dual identity threat vs. affirmation for minority school performance

(1) Baysu, Gülseli; (2) Celeste, Laura

(1) Associate Professor, Kadir Has University, Istanbul, Turkey; (2) PhD researcher, CSCP, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

221/13404 Dual identity and the support for minority rights: The moderating role of identity acceptance

(1) Verkuyten, Maykel

(1) Professor, Ercomer, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

221/13405 Discussion

(1) Brewer, Marilynn

(1) Professor Emerita, Ohio State University, US & Honorary Professor, University of New South Wales, Australia

221/73 - Theoretical and Empirical Advances in Evaluative Conditioning

Room: Machuca

Evaluative Conditioning (EC) refers to changes in participants’ evaluation of conditional stimuli (CSs) following their pairing with unconditional stimuli of positive or negative valence (USs). The symposium highlights novel empirical and theoretical advances within EC research.

Chair
Christian Unkelbach
Psychologist. Professor. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Universität zu Köln. Köln. Germany.

221/7301 Context Sensitivity of Evaluative Conditioning: CS-US Contingencies Predict Evaluative Shifts

(1) Ihmels, Max; (2) Hütter, Mandy

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Tübingen. Tübingen, Germ; (2) Psychologist. Professor. University of Tübingen. Germany

221/7302 Physiological arousal moderates implicit, but not, explicit, evaluative conditioning effects.

(1) Balas, Robert; (2) Sweklej, Joanna; (3) Pochwatko, Grzegorz; (4) Świdrak, Justyna

(1) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Polish Academy of Sciences. Warsaw. Poland.; (2) Psychologist. University of Social Sciences and Humanities. Warsaw. Poland.; (3) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Polish Academy of Sciences. Warsaw. Poland.; (4) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Polish Academy of Sciences. Warsaw. Poland.

221/7303 The Role of Individual Differences in EC: Psychopathy, Need to Evaluate, and Right-Wing Authoritarianism

(1) Mierop, Adrien; (2) Corneille, Olivier

(1) Psychologist. Psychological Sciences Research Institute. Catholic University of Louvain. Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Psychological Sciences Research Institute. Catholic University of Louvain. Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium.

221/7304 Investigating the structure of Attribute Conditioning: How do CSs become athletic, musical, and sexy?

(1) Unkelbach, Christian; (2) Högden, Fabia

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Universität zu Köln. Cologne. Germany.; (2) Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Universität zu Köln. Cologne. Germany.

221/7305 A memory-and-retrieval model of evaluative conditioning

(1) Gast, Anne

(1) Psychologist. Social Cognition Center Cologne. Department of Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/171 - Drivers of seeking or avoiding intergroup contact: From the genetic, to social and multilevel predictors

Room: Picasso

For intergroup contact’s benefits to materialise, intergroup contact must first take place. Unfortunately, in the real world, groups often remain largely segregated. This symposium comprises cutting edge research on why people choose to engage in or avoid intergroup contact.

Chair
Fiona Kate Barlow
Social Psychologist. School of Psychology. The University of Queensland. Queensland. Australia.

221/17101 Genetic influences on individuals’ tendency to engage in inter-group contact

(1) Barlow, Fiona Kate; (2) Sherlock, James M.; (3) Zietsch, Brendan P.

(1) Social Psychologist, School of Psychology The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia; (2) Evolutionary Psychologist, School of Psychology The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia; (3) Evolutionary Psychologist, School of Psychology The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia

221/17102 Predicting interest in contact and integration attitudes: Positive and negative contact among U.S.-Born and Immigrants

(1) Tropp, Linda; (2) Okamoto, Dina; (3) Marrow, Helen; (4) Jones-Correa, Michael

(1) Social Psychologist, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA; (2) Social Psychologist, University of Indiana, USA; (3) Social Psychologist, Tufts University, USA; (4) Social Psychologist, University of Pennsylvania, USA

221/17103 The interaction of positive and negative intergroup contact on outgroup avoidance

(1) Fell, Benjamin; (2) Hewstone, Miles; (3) Lolliot, Simon; (4) Schmid, Katharina; (5) Tausch, Nicole; (6) Voci, Alberto

(1) Social Psychologist, University of Oxford, UK; (2) Social Psychologist, University of Oxford, UK; (3) Social Psychologist, University of British Columbia, Canada; (4) Social Psychologist, University of Oxford, UK; (5) Social Psychologist, University of St Andrews, UK; (6) Social Psychologist, University of Padova, Italy

221/17104 The Belfast Mobility Project: Contact, segregation and the time-geography of residents’ pathways through the city

(1) Dixon, John; (2) Jarman, Neil; (3) Hocking, Bree; (4) Sturgeon, Brendan; (5) Whyatt, Duncan; (6) Bryan, Dominic; (7) Huck, Jonny

(1) Social Psychologist, Open University, UK; (2) Social Psychologist, Institute for Conflict Research and Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland; (3) Social Psychologist, Open University, UK; (4) Social Psychologist, Institute for Conflict Research and Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland; (5) Social Psychologist, Lancaster University, UK; (6) Social Psychologist, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland; (7) Social Psychologist, University of Manchester, UK

221/17105 Approaching and avoiding diversity: A multilevel test of non-Muslims invited to a Muslim hijab stall

(1) Paolini, Stefania; (2) Azam, Fatima; (3) Harwood, Jake; (4) Hewstone, Miles

(1) Social Psychologist, The University of Newcastle, Australia; (2) Social Psychologist, The University of Newcastle, Australia; (3) Social Psychologist, The University of Arizona, USA; (4) Social Psychologist, The University of Oxford, UK

221/117 - Barriers to achieving gender equality: Shortcomings of placing the burden on women

Room: Dinner 1

Women remain underrepresented high status positions and occupations. This symposium discusses the limitations of placing the burden on women to fix this imbalance and suggests strategies for getting men involved in gender equality.

Chair
Thekla Morgenroth
Research Fellow. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. United Kingdom.

221/11701 Breaking the Glass Ceiling: For one and for all?

(1) Manzi Cembrano, Maria Francesca; (2) Heilman, Madeline

(1) PhD student. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York City. USA.; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York City. USA.

221/11702 I’m not like other women: The role of categorization threat in the Queen Bee phenomenon

(1) Derks, Belle; (2) Scheepers, Daan; (3) van Laar, Colette; (4) Ellemers, Naomi

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands; (2) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Leiden University. Leiden. Netherlands; (3) Professor. Department of Psychology and Educational Sciences. Leuven University. Leuven. Belgium.; (4) Professor. Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands

221/11703 Why “Lean In”? Contextual constraints to women’s decisions to make sacrifices for their careers

(1) Ryan, Michelle; (2) Peters, Kim

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK. and Professor. Department of Economics and Business. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands; (2) Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/11704 Beyond bias: A social change agenda for gender equality research

(1) Subasic, Emina; (2) Branscombe, Nyla; (3) Ryan, Michelle; (4) Reynolds, Katherine; (5) Hardacre, Stephanie; (6) Elton, Benjamin

(1) Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Newcastle. Newcastle. Australia.; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Kansas. Lawrence. USA.; (3) Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK. and Professor. Department of Economics and Business. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands; (4) Professor. Department of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia.; (5) PhD student. Department of Psychology. University of Newcastle. Newcastle. Australia.; (6) University of Newcastle. Newcastle. Australia.

221/11705 Caring leaders: The impact of parental leave on the perception of transformational leadership

(1) Gloor, Jamie L.; (2) Horvath, Lisa; (3) Braun, Susanne; (4) Peus, Claudia

(1) Technical University of Munich. Munich. Germany.; (2) Research fellow. School of Management. Technical University of Munich. Munich. Germany.; (3) Senior Lecturer. Business School. Durham University. Durham. UK.; (4) Professor. School of Management. Technical University of Munich. Munich. Germany.

221/167 - The socio-ecological perspective in social psychology: Current directions and future prospects

Room: Dinner 2

"Social psychology is enriched by a socio-ecological perspective, which examines the interplay between psychological processes and the broader social, political, and economic context within which they occur. We show how socio-ecological research bridges multiple levels of analysis in social psychology.
"

Chair
Tim Wildschut
Department of Psychology. University of Southampton. Southampton. England. United Kingdom.

221/16701 Economic Culture and Children’s Responses to Ostracism Situations

(1) Uskul, Ayse; (2) Over, Harriet

(1) School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, UK; (2) Department of Psychology, University of York, York, England, UK

221/16702 Examining Relational and Group Collectivism in Management Practices: Evidence from China

(1) Yang, Huadong; (2) Wang, Yongli; (3) Ren, Xiaopeng; (4) Michaelides, George

(1) Management School, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England, UK; (2) Department of Business Administration, Sun-Yat Sen University, Guangzhou, China; (3) Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; (4) Department of Organizational Psychology, Birbeck, University of London, London, England, UK

221/16703 Exploring the Cognitive Impact of Poor Socioeconomic Conditions: A Case of Deficit or Psychological Shift

(1) Sheehy-Skeffington, Jennifer; (2) Price, Michael; (3) Havmose, Philip

(1) Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, London School of Economics, London, England, UK; (2) Psychology, Department of Life Sciences, Brunel University, London, England, UK; (3) Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, London School of Economics, London, England, UK

221/16704 Testing the discontinuity—nostalgia hypothesis: Do inhabitants of socio-economically fragile states express more nostalgia on Facebook?

(1) Wildschut, Tim; (2) Van Tilburg, Wijnand; (3) Sedikides, Constantine; (4) Rife, Sean; (5) Kosinski, Michal; (6) Stillwell, David

(1) Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, England, UK; (2) Department of Psychology, King's College London, London, England, UK; (3) Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, England, UK; (4) Psychology Department, Murray State University, Murray, Kentucy, USA; (5) Stanford Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA; (6) Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, UK

221/118 - Transcending the present: How temporal perspectives alter emotion, cognition, and behavior

Room: Andalucía III

Temporal perspectives (e.g., temporal distance, past or future temporal focus, counterfactuals) affect emotion, cognition, and behaviour across contexts. This symposium demonstrates that cognitions about the future and the past alter individual responses to the present in predictable and meaningful ways.

Chair
Annika Scholl
Psychologist. Social Processes Lab. IWM Tuebingen. Tuebingen. Germany.

221/11801 Learning from afar: How temporal distance affects what we learn

(1) Liberman, Nira; (2) Ram, Hadar

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel.; (2) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Tel Aviv University. Tel Aviv. Israel.

221/11802 This too shall pass: Implications of temporal distancing for emotion-regulation

(1) Ayduk, Ozlem; (2) Bruehlman-Senecal, Emma; (3) John, Oliver

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Relationships and Social Cognition Lab. University of California. Berkeley. USA; (2) Psychologist. Relationships and Social Cognition Lab. University of California. Berkeley. USA; (3) Psychologist. Professor. Berkeley Personality Lab. University of California. Berkeley. USA

221/11803 Alternatives to the past and in the future: Their impact on motivation in the present

(1) Epstude, Kai; (2) Seehusen, Johannes; (3) Spears, Russell

(1) Psychologist. Associate professor. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. The Netherlands.; (2) Psychologist. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. The Netherlands.; (3) Psychologist. Full professor. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. The Netherlands.

221/11804 Sharing the future: Temporal focus affects prosociality

(1) Rabinovich, Anna; (2) Morton, Thomas; (3) Birney, Megan

(1) Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. UK.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Exeter. UK.; (3) Psychologist. Lecturer. University Centre Shrewsbury. Chester. UK.

221/11805 Time will tell: How a long-term time perspective alters the perception of social power

(1) Scholl, Annika; (2) Sassenberg, Kai

(1) Psychologist. Social Processes Lab. IWM Tuebingen. Tuebingen. Germany; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Social Processes Lab. IWM Tuebingen. Tuebingen. Germany

221/101 - Facing threats of social exclusion: How to cope with ostracism and rejection

Room: Andalucía II

Past research shows that social exclusion (e.g., ostracism and rejection) can causes a wide array of negative consequences. This symposium will provide the audience with the state-of-the-art knowledge on psychological research devoted to ways to cope with social exclusion.

Chair
Paolo Riva
Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Milano-Bicocca. Milano. Italy.

221/10101 Identification with all humanity helps people cope with social exclusion

(1) Riva, Paolo

(1) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Milano-Bicocca. Milano. Italy.

221/10102 Cognitive Strategies that Help Improve Recovery from Short-Term Ostracism

(1) Wesselmann, Eric; (2) Hales, Andrew H.; (3) Williams, Kipling D.

(1) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Illinois State University. Normal. USA.; (2) Psychologist. Department of Psychological Sciences. Purdue University. West Lafayette. USA.; (3) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychological Sciences. Purdue University. West Lafayette. USA.

221/10103 Should we help? The important role of observers’ moral judgment about victims of ostracism

(1) Rudert, Selma; (2) Greifeneder, Rainer

(1) Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. University of Basel. Basel. Switzerland.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Basel. Basel. Switzerland.

221/10104 Harnessing social pain to reduce retaliation and increase reconnection

(1) Chester, David

(1) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Virginia Commonwealth University. Richmond. USA.

221/10105 Discussant

(1) Williams, Kipling

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychological Sciences. Purdue University. West Lafayette. USA.

221/211 - The Consequences of Coping with Existential Threat for (Inter)Group Cognition and Judgment

Room: Seminar

We examine how coping with existential threats changes the way ingroups and outgroups are construed. The diverse talks integrate findings by showing how different motives – for certainty and moral value – lead to divergent (inter)group judgments and blaming.

Chair
Mirosław Kofta
Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Faculty. University of Warsaw. Warsaw. Poland.

221/21101 The Role of Existential Motivation in Blaming Perpetrators and Victims

(1) Young, Isaac; (2) Sullivan, Daniel; (3) Palitsky, Roman Palitsky

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Arizona. Tuscon. USA.; (2) Psychologist, Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Arizona. Tuscon. USA.; (3) Psychologist, Department of Psychology. University of Arizona. Tuscon. USA.

221/21102 Social Nostalgia as a Means of Coping with Collective Existential Threats

(1) Baldwin, Matthew; (2) White, Mark H.; (3) Sullivan, Daniel

(1) Psychologist. Social Cognition Center. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.; (2) Psychologist. Psychology Department. University of Kansas. Lawrence. USA; (3) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Arizona. Tuscon. USA.

221/21103 Ingroup as a Shield: Existential Threat to the Ingroup Increases Accessibility of Group Agency-Related Traits

(1) Soral, Wiktor; (2) Kofta, Mirosław

(1) Psychologist. Institute for Social Studies. University of Warsaw. Warsaw. Poland; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Faculty. University of Warsaw. Warsaw. Poland.

221/21104 Threat to Self-Certainty, RWA, and Ingroup Identity as Determinants of Immigrant Blaming

(1) Kofta, Mirosław; (2) BŁAŻEWICZ, Marek

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Faculty. University of Warsaw. Warsaw. Poland.; (2) Psychologist. Institute for Social Studies. University of Warsaw. Warsaw. Poland.

221/21105 Radicalization under Terrorist Threat: Effects of Intolerance of Uncertainty on Attitudes Toward Immigrants

(1) Czernatowicz-Kukuczka, Aneta; (2) Szwed, Paulina; (3) Kossowska, Małgorzata; (4) Sekerdej, Maciej

(1) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Cracow. Poland; (2) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Cracow. Poland; (3) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Cracow. Poland; (4) Psychologist. Professor. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Cracow. Poland

221/80 - The Social Psychology of Intergroup Hostility

Room: Andalucía I

Across the world there are numerous examples of intergroup hostility, including aggression towards migrant groups, violent action undertaken by oppressed groups, and support for militant groups (e.g., ISIS). In this symposium assesses what promotes these different types of intergroup hostility.

Chair
Lee Shepherd
Senior Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Northumbria University. Newcastle upon Tyne. United Kingdom.

221/8001 Role of state repression in radicalising collective action: Survey study from Russia and Hong Kong

(1) Ayanian, Arin H.; (2) Tausch, Nicole; (3) Cheung, VerBon; (4) Lukyanova, Yulia

(1) PhD Candidate, School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland; (2) Reader, School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland; (3) Research Fellow, Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; (4) PhD Candidate, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland

221/8002 Social psychological predictors of attitudes toward ISIS among Sunnis from Tripoli, Lebanon

(1) Saab, Rim; (2) Harb, Charles; (3) Hijazi, Alaa

(1) Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; (2) Professor of Psychology, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; (3) Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon

221/8003 The Role of Threat, Emotions, and Prejudice in Promoting Collective Action Against Immigrant Groups

(1) Shepherd, Lee; (2) Fasoli, Fabio; (3) Pereira, Andrea; (4) Branscombe, Nyla

(1) Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tynes, UK; (2) Research Fellow, School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guilford, UK; (3) Research Fellow, Psychology Department, New York University, New York, USA; (4) Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA

221/8004 Discussant

(1) Livingstone, Andrew

(1) Senior Lecturer, Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK