Symposia: Presentations IX

Friday 7 July
9.00 - 10.40 h.
 

 

221/40 - Social Psychology and Refugees

Room: Manuel Falla

Issues arising from current mass migrations of refugees demand our attention as social psychologists. This symposium offers a snap-shot of European social-psychological research on refugees, featuring work in four different contexts with a variety of methods.

Chair
Rupert Brown
Social Psychologist. School of Psychology. Sussex University. Brighton. United Kingdom.

221/4001 European research on immigration

(1) Wagner, Uli; (2) Greipl, Simon

(1) Social Psychologist; Psychology; Marburg University; Marburg; Germany; (2) Psychologist; Marburg University; Marburg; Germany

221/4002 Psychosocial support among Syrian refugees in Jordan: An ethnographic exploration of the role of social identity

(1) Alfadhli, Khalifah; (2) Drury, John

(1) social psychologist; Psychology; Sussex University; Brighton; UK; (2) social psychologist; Psychology; Sussex University; Brighton; UK

221/4003 Intergroup contact and well-being among refugees in the UK

(1) Brown, Rupert; (2) Tip, Linda

(1) social psychologist; Psychology; Sussex University; Brighton; UK; (2) social psychologist; Global Studies; Sussex University; Brighton; UK.

221/4004 Should we help or not? Moral inclinations, helping and the refugee crisis

(1) Kutlaca, Maja; (2) Kuppens, Toon; (3) Spears, Russell

(1) social psychologist; Psychology; Groningen University; Groningen; Netherlands.; (2) social psychologist; Psychology; Groningen University; Groningen; Netherlands; (3) social psychologist; Psychlogy; Groningen University; Groningen; Netherlands

221/4005 When contact doesn't work: intergroup contact and attitudes towards asylum seekers and intial reception centres in the neighbourhood

(1) Kotzur, Patrick F.; (2) Wagner, Ulrich

(1) University of Marburg. Germany; (2) University of Marburg. Germany

221/200 - Causes and consequences of being moved: Three models

Room: Machuca

Being moved is a positive emotional state marked by weeping, goosebumps, and sensations in the chest, and motivating prosociality. The symposium assembles recent work on three different (and competing) approaches to understand the causes of this state.

Chair
Thomas Schubert
Associate Professor. Department of Social Psychology. University of Oslo. Oslo. Norway.

221/20001 On the causes and consequences of “being moved”

(1) Strick, Madelijn; (2) van Soolingen, Jantine

(1) Assistant Professor. Department of Social, Health & Organisational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands; (2) Department of Social, Health & Organisational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands

221/20002 Being moved by virtue, success and music: The role of surpassing internal standards

(1) Landmann, Helen; (2) Cova, Florian; (3) Hess, Ursula

(1) Researcher. Institute for Psychology. University of Hagen. Germany.; (2) Researcher. Swiss Center for Affectives Sciences. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.; (3) Professor. Department of Psychology. Humboldt University. Berlin. Germany.

221/20003 Interpersonal closeness and morality predict feelings of being moved

(1) Seibt, Beate; (2) Zickfeld, Janis

(1) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Oslo. Oslo. Norway.; (2) PhD Student. Department of Psychology. University of Oslo. Oslo. Norway.

221/20004 To understand an emotion, you need to compare its manifestations across diverse cultures

(1) Fiske, Alan; (2) Schubert, Thomas

(1) Professor. Department of Anthropology. University of California, Los Angeles. Los Angeles. United States.; (2) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Oslo. Oslo. Norway.

221/20005 Being moved and the social sharing of emotions

(1) Rimé, Bernard

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Louvain at Louvain-la-Neuve. Louvain-la-Neuve. Belgium

221/79 - Truly relational: A social network approach to intergroup relations

Room: Picasso

This symposium showcases work that illustrates why social network analysis is useful to study intergroup relations. Across four presentations findings challenge traditional assumptions on direct and extended intergroup contact.

Chair
Philipp Jugert
Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Leipzig. Leipzig. Germany.

221/7901 Who becomes and who stays friends? Ethnic segregation and creation and maintenance homophily of friendships

(1) Hellpap, Robert; (2) Jonsson, Jan O.; (3) Raabe, Isabel

(1) Sociologist, Nuffield College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; (2) Sociologist, Nuffield College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; (3) Sociologist, Nuffield College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

221/7902 The Effects of Ethnic Minority Adolescents’ Ethnic Self-Identification on Friendship Selection

(1) Leszczensky, Lars; (2) Jugert, Philipp; (3) Pink, Sebastian

(1) Sociologist, Mannheim Centre for European Social Research, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany; (2) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; (3) Sociologist, Mannheim Centre for European Social Research, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany

221/7903 Studying Positive and Negative Direct and Extended Contact: Complementing Self-Reports with Social Network Analysis

(1) Woelfer, Ralf

(1) Psychologist, New College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

221/7904 A Social Network Approach to Understanding the Extended Contact Hypothesis

(1) Stark, Tobias; (2) Coenders, Marcel T. A.

(1) Sociologist, European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; (2) Sociologist, European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands

221/7905 Discussant

(1) Hewstone, Miles

(1) Psychologist, New College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

221/85 - Reducing prejudice and enhancing equality: Exploring the unintended consequences of practical interventions

Room: Dinner 1

There are a range of government and organisational interventions designed to reduce prejudice and enhance equality. This symposium includes 5 speakers who each examine the unintended consequences of such interventions and the implications for the implementations of practical interventions.

Chair
Michelle Ryan
University of Exeter. Exeter. UK and University of Groningen. The Netherlands.

221/8501 The Demands of Diversity Philosophies: Strategic Self-Stereotyping Among Racial Minorities

(1) Kirby, Teri; (2) Kaiser, Cheryl R.

(1) University of Exeter, UK; (2) University of Washington, USA

221/8502 Unintended consequences resulting from media coverage of wise interventions

(1) Ikizer, Elif

(1) University of Connecticut, USA

221/8503 Body weight mindsets: The double-edged sword effects of weight beliefs on anti-fat prejudice and self-stigma

(1) Hoyt, Crystal; (2) Burnette, Jeni L.

(1) Jepson School of Leadership Studies and Department of Psychology , University of Richmond, USA; (2) Department of Psychology, North Carolina State University, USA

221/8504 Aspirational targets as a diversity management tool: Diversity outcomes and implications for inclusion.

(1) O’Brien, Anne; (2) Peters, Kim; (3) Kurz, Tim

(1) The Business School, University of Exeter, UK; (2) School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia; (3) Department of Psychology, University of Bath, UK

221/8505 Trapped between a rock and a hard place? Family-friendly policies and the evaluation of mothers

(1) Morgenroth, Thekla; (2) Heilman, Madeline

(1) University of Exeter, UK; (2) New York University, USA

221/123 - Honor and Group Processes

Room: Dinner 2

"This symposium presents research on the multiple ways in which honor is central to a variety of group processes (e.g., intergroup attitudes; in-group morality; emotions; protection of social image; collective action) across diverse sociopolitical and cultural contexts.
"

Chair
Patricia M. Rodriguez Mosquera
Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. Wesleyan University. Middletown. USA.

221/12301 When honor amplifies intergroup emotions: Culture, identity, and emotional reactions to intergroup insults

(1) Maitner, Angela; (2) Mackie, Diane M.; (3) Pauketat, Janet V. T.; (4) Smith, Eliot R.

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Department of International Studies, American University of Sharjah, Sharjah, UAE; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA; (3) Psychologist. Graduate student. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA; (4) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA

221/12302 Personal Values and Intergroup Outcomes of Concern for Group Honor

(1) Levin, Shana; (2) Roccas, Sonia; (3) Sidanius, Jim; (4) Pratto, Felicia

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, USA; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel, Raanana, Israel; (3) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; (4) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychological Sciences. University of Connecticut, Storrs, USA

221/12303 Honor and Social Change: Dual Routes from Social Identity to Collective Action against Organised Crime

(1) Travaglino, Giovanni

(1) Psychologist. Professor. School of Psychology, University of Kent, Kent, UK

221/12304 Morality-based Honor, Social Image Concerns, and Emotions in Group Context

(1) Rodriguez Mosquera, Patricia M.

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. Wesleyan University, Middletown, USA

221/215 - Implicit Misattribution Procedures: Current perspectives and controversies

Room: Andalucía III

The affect misattribution task and its variants are very promising indirect measures to assess people’s automatic reactions. However, many questions regarding the underlying processes or potential boundaries are still unanswered. The symposium focuses on recent developments and new approaches.

Chair
Michaela Rohr
Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. Saarland University. Saarbruecken. Germany.

221/21501 What Cognitive Mechanisms Support the Self-Regulation of Spontaneously Activated Stereotypes?

(1) Rivers, Andrew; (2) Rees, Heather R.; (3) Sherman, Jeffrey W.; (4) Reichardt, Regina

(1) Psychologist. Graduate Student. Psychology Department. University of California-Davis. Davis. USA.; (2) Psychologist. Graduate Student. Psychology Department. University of California-Davis. Davis. USA.; (3) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. University of California-Davis. Davis. USA.; (4) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. University of Regensburg. Regensburg. Germany.

221/21502 The Affect Misattribution Procedure: In search of effects of prejudice

(1) Teige-Mocigemba, Sarah; (2) Becker, Manuel; (3) Sherman, Jeffrey W.; (4) Reichardt, Regina; (5) Klauer, Karl Christoph

(1) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. University of Freiburg. Freiburg Germany.; (2) Psychologist. Graduate Student. Psychology Department. University of Freiburg. Freiburg. Germany.; (3) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. University of California-Davis. Davis. USA.; (4) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. University of Regensburg. Regensburg. Germany.; (5) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. University of Freiburg. Freiburg. Germany.

221/21503 More than one dimension: Examining the role of task instruction in the AMP

(1) Paulus, Andrea; (2) Rohr, Michaela

(1) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. Technical University of Munich. Munich. Germany; (2) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. Saarland University. Saarbruecken. Germany.

221/21504 The Emotion Misattribution Procedure: Adapting the AMP to the misattribution of specific emotion aspects

(1) Wentura, Dirk; (2) Rohr, Michaela; (3) Folyi, Timea; (4) Degner, Juliane

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. Saarland University. Saarbruecken. Germany.; (2) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. Saarland University. Saarbruecken. Germany.; (3) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Psychology Department. Saarland University. Saarbruecken. Germany.; (4) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.

221/21505 Discussion

(1) Gawronski, Bertram

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. University of Texas. Austin. USA.

221/125 - Deep impact: How social exclusion affects experience and behavior

Room: Andalucía II

To promote a differentiated overview of the impact of social exclusion, the symposium examines hitherto unknown consequences of social exclusion and meaningful conditions under which being excluded is followed by more or less negative outcomes.

Chair
Michaela Pfundmair
Psychologist. Professor. LMU Munich. Munich. Germany.

221/12501 How ostracism leads to extreme moral attitudes and radical behavior

(1) Pfundmair, Michaela; (2) Wetherell, Geoffrey

(1) Psychologist. Professor. LMU Munich. Munich. Germany.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Valparaiso University. Valparaiso, Indiana. USA.

221/12502 An ironic response to ostracism: Solitude seeking

(1) Ren, Dongning; (2) Williams, Kipling D.

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Tilburg University. Tilburg. The Netherlands.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Purdue University. West Lafayette, Indiana. USA.

221/12503 Embodied exclusion: Facial expression and heart rate in response to social exclusion manipulations

(1) Nguyen, Thomas; (2) Young, Nathaniel; (3) Graupmann, Verena

(1) Psychologist. DePaul University. Chicago, Illinois. USA.; (2) Psychologist. DePaul University. Chicago, Illinois. USA.; (3) Psychologist. Professor. DePaul University. Chicago, Illinois. USA.

221/12504 When rejection is ignored: Social anxiety and rejection by (relative) strangers or friends

(1) Schaafsma, Juliette

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Tilburg University. Tilburg. The Netherlands.

221/12505 Safety in beauty? Social exclusion and the desire to reconnect with physically attractive people

(1) Aydin, Nilüfer; (2) Agthe, Maria; (3) Pfundmair, Michaela; (4) Frey, Dieter; (5) DeWall, C. Nathan

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Alpen-Adria-University. Klagenfurt. Austria.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. LMU Munich. Munich. Germany.; (3) Psychologist. Professor. LMU Munich. Munich. Germany.; (4) Psychologist. Professor. LMU Munich. Munich. Germany.; (5) Psychologist. Professor. University of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky. USA.

221/172 - Effortful cognition

Room: Seminar

The symposium brings together recent studies concerned with effortful cognition. It will include new empirical work as well as two meta-analyses. The role of need for cognitive closure, dysphoria and behavioral restraint in determining effort will be discussed.

Chair
Ewa Szumowska
Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. Jagiellonian University. Krakow. Poland.

221/17201 Open the closed mind: Motivation towards closure and effortful cognition

(1) Kossowska, Małgorzata; (2) Dragon, Piotr; (3) Szumowska, Ewa

(1) Psychologist. Professor. Jagiellonian University. Krakow. Poland.; (2) Psychologist. Jagiellonian University. Krakow. Poland.; (3) Psychologist. Jagiellonian University. Krakow. Poland.

221/17202 Multifaceted Effects of Need for Closure on Effort: A Cardiovascular Response Study

(1) Szumowska, Ewa; (2) Szwed, Paulina; (3) Kossowska, Małgorzata; (4) Wright, Rex A.

(1) Psychologist. Jagiellonian University. Krakow. Poland.; (2) Psychologist. Jagiellonian University. Krakow. Poland.; (3) Psychologist. Professor. Jagiellonian University. Krakow. Poland.; (4) Psychologist. Professor. University of North Texas. USA.

221/17203 Not motivated despite rewards or punishments? Evidence from effort-related cardiovascular reactivity of dysphoric individuals

(1) Brinkmann, Kerstin; (2) Franzen, Jessica

(1) Psychologist. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.; (2) Psychologist. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.

221/17204 Cardiovascular correlates of motivated effort: A meta-analysis of 91 studies on motivational intensity theory

(1) Richter, Michael; (2) Brinkmann, Kerstin; (3) Carbajal, Ivan

(1) Psychologist. Liverpool John Moores University. Liverpool. United Kingdom.; (2) Psychologist. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.; (3) Psychologist. University of North Texas. USA.

221/17205 Babies and bathwater: clarifying the role of resource depletion in determining inhibitory control

(1) Wright, Rex A.

(1) Psychologist. Professor. University of North Texas. USA.

221/124 - Intergroup Leadership: Bridging the Divide

Room: Andalucía I

Successful leaders create a shared social identity. Importantly, when leading multiple subgroups or across intergroup divides, leaders must also protect subgroup identities. This symposium explores how leaders can evoke different social identities to improve organizational effectiveness and intergroup collaboration.

Chair
David Rast III
Social Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Alberta. Edmonton. Canada.

221/12401 Imagined Interactions with Leaders Elevates Organizational Identification

(1) Crisp, Richard; (2) Meleady, Rose

(1) Social Psychologist. Professor. Aston Business School. Aston University. Birmingham. UK.; (2) Social Psychologist. Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of East Anglia. Norwich. UK.

221/12402 The Intergroup Dynamics of Leadership Potential

(1) Tresh, Fátima; (2) Randsley de Moura, Georgina

(1) Social Psychologist. PhD Candidate. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK.; (2) Social Psychologist. Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK.

221/12403 Inefficiencies in Humanitarian Aid Field Offices: A Case for Intergroup Leadership

(1) Van Quaquebeke, Niels; (2) Salem, Mojtaba; (3) Meyer, Louisa; (4) Besiou, Maria

(1) Social Psychologist. Professor. Management Department. Kühne Logistics University. Hamburg. Germany.; (2) Psychologist. Doctoral Student. Management Department. Kühne Logistics University. Hamburg. Germany.; (3) Psychologist. Doctoral Student. Management Department. Kühne Logistics University. Hamburg. Germany.; (4) Psychologist. Doctoral Student. Management Department. Kühne Logistics University. Hamburg. Germany.

221/12404 Describing “Us” in Times of Uncertainty: Leaders’ Strategic Use of Social Identity Rhetoric

(1) Gaffney, Amber; (2) Rast III, David; (3) Hogg, Michael; (4) Crisp, Richard

(1) Social Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Humboldt State University. Arcata. USA.; (2) Social Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Alberta. Edmonton. Canada.; (3) Social Psychologist. Professor. Department of Psychology. Claremont Graduate University. Claremont. USA.; (4) Social Psychologist. Professor. Aston Business School. Aston University. Birmingham. UK.