Symposia: Presentations VIII

Thursday 6 July
16.40 - 18.20 h.
 

 

221/100 - Recent developments in top-down influences on social categorization processes

Room: Manuel Falla

The four presentations in this symposium demonstrate the role of a range of top-down effects such as expectancies, motivations, prejudice, and prior knowledge in determining early visual processing of cross-race faces and representations of social categories.

Chair
Kerry Kawakami
Psychologist. Department of Psychology. York University. Toronto. Canada.

221/10001 A dynamic approach to social categorization: Behavioral and neural evidence

(1) Freeman, Jonathan; (2) Stolier, Ryan M.; (3) Pauker, Kristin; (4) Sanchez, Diana T.

(1) Psychologist, New York University, New York, USA; (2) Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, USA; (3) Psychologist, University of Manoa, Honolulu, USA; (4) Psychologist, Rutgers University, Piscataway, USA

221/10002 Same-same but different: The impact of similarity and race on face perception

(1) Kawakami, Kerry; (2) Williams, Amanda; (3) Friesen, Justin; (4) Vingilis-Jaremko, Larissa; (5) Sidhu, David; (6) Rodríguez-Bailón, Rosa; (7) Cañadas, Elena

(1) Psychologist, York University, Toronto, Canada; (2) Psychologist, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; (3) Psychologist, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada; (4) Psychologist, York University, Toronto, Canada; (5) Graduate Student, Psychology Department, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; (6) Psychologist, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; (7) Psychologist, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

221/10003 Economic scarcity alters social perception to promote racial discrimination: Evidence from the brain and behavior

(1) Krosch, Amy; (2) Amodio, David M.

(1) Psychologist, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA; (2) Psychologist, New York University, New York, USA

221/10004 Visualizing the development of social categories

(1) Dunham, Yarrow

(1) Psychologist, Yale University, New Haven, USA

221/60 - The social psychology of (dis-)belief in science

Room: Machuca

Attitudes towards science appear to be increasingly polarized. This symposium brings together recent research endeavors aimed at understanding how people evaluate science and scientific evidence. Together, the contributions show that science is often misconstrued due to ideological and motivational factors.

Chair
Bastiaan Rutjens
Assistant professor in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/6001 Exploring the ideological antecedents of science skepticism: Conservatism, morality, and religiosity

(1) Rutjens, Bastiaan; (2) Sutton, Robbie

(1) Assistant professor. Psychology Department. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (2) Professor of Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

221/6002 Attitude roots: Understanding and overcoming the motivated rejection of science

(1) Hornsey, Matthew J.; (2) Fielding, Kelly S

(1) Professor. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.; (2) Associate professor. School of Psychology. University of Queensland. Brisbane. Australia.

221/6003 Explaining moralized opposition to genetically modified food in the U.S. and Europe

(1) Scott, Sydney; (2) Inbar, Yoel; (3) Rozin, Paul

(1) Doctoral student. Psychology department. University of Pennsylvania. Philadelpha. USA.; (2) Associate professor. Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Toronto. Canada; (3) Professor. Psychology department. University of Pennsylvania. Philadelpha. USA.

221/6004 Is DNA Destiny? How Essences Distort how we Think about the Genes

(1) Heine, Steven

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver, Canada

221/6005 Belief in scientific-technological progress and life satisfaction: the role of personal control

(1) Stavrova, Olga; (2) Ehlebracht, Daniel; (3) Fetchenhauer, Detlef

(1) Assistant Professor. Department of Psychology. Tilburg University. Tilburg. The Netherlands; (2) Junior professor. Institut für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie (ISS). University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.; (3) Professor. Institut für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie (ISS). University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/221 - The Danger of Glorifying the Ingroup: Implications for Intragroup Behavior and Intergroup Relations

Room: Picasso

This symposium explores the effects of glorification (versus attachment) on a variety of group-based attitudes and behaviors in both intra- and intergroup contexts. We demonstrate that glorification discourages constructive, ingroup-critical behavior and exacerbates conflicts with outgroups.

Chair
Mengyao Li
PhD candidate. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. University of Massachusetts Amherst. Amherst. USA.

221/22101 The Differential Effect of Identification Modes on Voice Behavior in Organization

(1) Roccas, Sonia; (2) Elster, Andrey; (3) Sagiv, Lilach

(1) Professor. Department of Education and Psychology. The Open University of Israel. Raanana. Israel.; (2) The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Jerusalem. Israel.; (3) The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Jerusalem. Israel.

221/22102 The relationship between ingroup glorification and victim beliefs in predicting intergroup attitudes and conflict opinions

(1) Vollhardt, Johanna; (2) Twali, Michelle; (3) Cohrs, Christopher; (4) McNeill, Andrew; (5) Hadjiandreou, Eliana

(1) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Clark University. Worcester. USA.; (2) Department of Psychology. Clark University. Worcester. USA.; (3) Professor of Psychology. Jacobs University Bremen. Bremen. Germany.; (4) Northumbria University. Newcastle upon Tyne. UK.; (5) Department of Psychology. Clark University. Worcester. USA.

221/22103 “A Very Moral Group”, towards Whom? Group Glorification and Responses to Aggression Against Civilians

(1) Schori Eyal, Noa; (2) Klar, Yechiel

(1) Post-doctoral Researcher. The IDC School of Psychology. Interdisciplinary Center (IDC). Herzliya. Israel.; (2) Professor. The School of Psychological Sciences. Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv. Israel.

221/22104 Stepping Into Perpetrators’ Shoes: Glorification Motivates Perspective-taking with Ingroup Perpetrators and the Implications for Justice

(1) Li, Mengyao; (2) Leidner, Bernhard; (3) Fernandez-Campos, Silvia

(1) PPsychologist. University of Massachusetts Amherst/ Max-Planck-Institute for Research on Collective Goods. USA.; (2) Assistant Professor. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. University of Massachusetts Amherst. Amherst. USA.; (3) The New School for Social Research. New York City. USA.

221/47 - How subtle social psychological mechanisms reinforce traditional gender roles and inequality

Room: Dinner 1

Using various methodologies and examining diverse populations and outcomes (e.g., endorsement of prescriptive beauty norms, help seeking/offering behavior, cognitive performance, and self-objectification/self-sexualization), this symposium presents empirical research that demonstrates how subtle social psychological mechanisms reinforce the traditional gender roles.

Chair
Nurit Shnabel
The School of Psychological Sciences. Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv. Israel.

221/4701 The beauty myth: Prescriptive norms that women should strive for beauty reflect oppressive motivations

(1) Shnabel, Nurit; (2) Ramati-Tzibar, Leeat; (3) Glick, Peter

(1) The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.; (2) The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.; (3) Department of Psychology, Lawrence University. Appleton, Wisconsin, USA.

221/4705 The effects of appearance compliments on women's and men's affect and cognitive performance

(1) Kahalon, Rotem; (2) Shnabel, Nurit

(1) School of Psychological Sciences. Tel-Aviv University, Israel.; (2) School of Psychological Sciences. Tel-Aviv University, Israel

221/4702 Benevolent sexism encourages dependency-oriented cross-gender helping relations

(1) Bareket, Orly; (2) Shnabel, Nurit; (3) Bar-Anan, Yoav; (4) Kende, Anna; (5) Lazar, Yael

(1) The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.; (2) The School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University. Tel-Aviv, Israel.; (3) Psychology Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Beer-Sheva, Israel.; (4) Department of Social Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest, Hungary.; (5) Department of Social Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest, Hungary.

221/4703 Do sexism and sensitivity to inequality explain cultural differences in self-objectification?

(1) Wollast, Robin; (2) Klein, Olivier; (3) Bernard, Philippe

(1) Unité de Psychologie Sociale, Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels, Belgium.; (2) Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium; (3) Unité de Psychologie Sociale, Université Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels, Belgium.

221/4704 Subtle social psychological mechanisms that reinforce traditional gender roles: Theoretical implications and practical applications

(1) Klein, Olivier

(1) Free University of Bruxelles, Belgium

221/106 - The social psychology of punishing “innocent” targets: Recent research on collective/vicarious/displaced punishment

Room: Dinner 2

Five talks will address the question when and why observers, victims or their fellow group members (i.e., vicarious punishment) lash out against entire groups (i.e., collective punishment) or individuals who were personally uninvolved in an original offense (i.e., displaced punishment).

Chair
Mario Gollwitzer
Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

221/10601 Morals, black sheep, and their victims: What triggers harsh punishment of unfair behavior?

(1) Hechler, Stefanie; (2) Kessler, Thomas

(1) PhD student in Psychology. Department of Psychology. Friedrich Schiller University of Jena. Jena. Germany.; (2) Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. Friedrich Schiller University of Jena. Jena. Germany.

221/10602 Characters of the ingroup that cause the members to retaliate vicariously

(1) Kumagai, Tomohiro

(1) Professor of Psychology. Department of Communication and Culture. Otsuma Women’s University. Tokyo. Japan.

221/10603 Displaced revenge aims at sending a message to the original perpetrator

(1) Gollwitzer, Mario; (2) Sjöström, Arne; (3) Magraw-Mickelson, Zoe

(1) Professor of Psychology. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.; (2) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.; (3) PhD student in Psychology. Department of Psychology. Philipps University Marburg. Marburg. Germany.

221/10604 Collective punishment as a function of entitativity and punishment goals

(1) Pereira, Andrea; (2) van Prooijen, Jan-Willem

(1) Postdoctoral Researcher. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. USA.; (2) Professor of Psychology. Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology. VU University. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/10605 When justice needs to be done, collective apologies only reduce collective punishment of valued groups

(1) Berent, Jacques; (2) Falomir Pichastor, Juan M

(1) Research Assistant. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.; (2) Professor of Psychology. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Geneva. Geneva. Switzerland.

221/162 - The moral lives of others: Person perception in moral judgment

Room: Andalucía III

Moral judgments center around judgments of persons: people oftentimes ask not “is this action wrong?”, but rather “is this person good or bad?” In this symposium we demonstrate how a person-centered approach has yielded new insight into the moral mind.

Chair
Paul Conway
Florida State University. USA.

221/16201 Person Centered Morality

(1) Uhlmann, Eric Luis; (2) Zhu, Luke (Lei); (3) Tannenbaum, David

(1) INSEAD Business School; (2) University of Manitoba; (3) University of Utah

221/16202 Inference of Trust from Intuitive Moral Judgments

(1) Everett, Jim A.C.; (2) Pizarro, David; (3) Crockett, Molly

(1) University of Oxford; (2) Cornell University; (3) University of Oxford

221/16203 Asymmetrical Conformity effects in moral cognition

(1) Bostyn, Dries H.; (2) Roets, Arne

(1) Ghent University; (2) Ghent University

221/16204 The Social Implications of Dilemma Judgments

(1) Conway, Paul

(1) Florida State University

221/159 - Not just a numbers game: How offer presentation and supplemental rationales influence negotiations

Room: Andalucía II

In addition to what you offer, how you make the offer plays a decisive role for negotiation success. In five talks, this symposium showcases the latest research on how offer presentation affects both interpersonal relations and settlement terms in negotiations.

Chair
Alice Lee
Columbia Business School. USA.

221/15901 Limits versus Critiques: Divergent effects of constraint and disparagement rationales in negotiations

(1) Lee, Alice; (2) Ames, Daniel

(1) Columbia Business School; (2) Columbia Business School

221/15902 The Motivated-Adjustment Model of Anchoring: How the Framing of Anchors Matter in Negotiations

(1) Majer, Johann; (2) Loschelder, David; (3) Galinsky, Adam; (4) Trötschel, Roman

(1) Leuphana University; (2) Leuphana University; (3) Columbia Business School; (4) Leuphana University

221/15903 Concession Request Frames in Negotiations

(1) Bhatia, Nazli; (2) Chow, Rosalind

(1) CATÓLICA-LISBON School of Business & Economics; (2) Carnegie Mellon University

221/15905 Discussion: How you present an offer is equally as important as what you offer.

(1) Loschelder, David

(1) Leuphana University Lüneburg

221/140 - When the online and offline worlds collide: Exploring how digital technology affects collective action

Room: Seminar

In this digital age, people have opportunities to engage with the social world in new and different ways. This symposium presents a timely opportunity to unpack the relationships between technology and psychology, engagement and slacktivism, online and offline mobilization.

Chair
Laura Smith
Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Bath. Bath. United Kingdom.

221/14001 After Aylan Kurdi: Online discussions about threat and harm increase solidarity with refugees over time

(1) Smith, Laura; (2) Thomas, Emma; (3) McGarty, Craig

(1) Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Bath. Bath. UK.; (2) School of Psychology. Flinders University. Adelaide. Australia.; (3) Professor of Social and Political Psychology. School of Social Sciences and Psychology. University of Western Sydney. Sydney. Australia.

221/14002 Reconsidering slacktivism: online collective action, perceived efficacy and activism experience combine to affect further participation

(1) Wilkins, Denise; (2) Livingstone, Andrew; (3) Levine, Mark

(1) PhD Candidate in Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK.; (2) Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology. College of Life and Environmental Sciences. University of Exeter. Exeter. UK.; (3) Professor of Social Psychology, University of Exeter. UK

221/14003 Activists’ Radicalization in the Context of Ingroup and Outgroup Visibility in Social Media and Offline

(1) Kende, Anna; (2) Schumann, Sandy; (3) Spears, Russell

(1) Social Psychologist. Department of Social Psychology. Eötvös Loránd University. Budapest. Hungary.; (2) Wiener-Anspach Post-doctoral Fellow. Centre for the Study of Intergroup Conflict. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK.; (3) Professor of Social Psychology. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands.

221/14004 Discussant

(1) Spears, Russell

(1) Professor of Social Psychology. Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences. University of Groningen. Groningen. Netherlands.

221/62 - Peer Influences on the Development of Aggressive Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence: Longitudinal Analyses

Room: Andalucía I

"The present symposium presents longitudinal and multi-level analyses examining the role of peer problems and peer socialization on the development of aggression in childhood and adolescence. All presentations are based on large data sets each including more than 1,000 participants.

"

Chair
Janis Jung
Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Universitiy of Potsdam. Potsdam. Germany.

221/6201 The Socializing Effect of Classroom Aggression on the Development of Aggression and Social Rejection

(1) Rohlf, Helena; (2) Krahé, Barbara; (3) Busching, Robert

(1) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany; (2) Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany; (3) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

221/6202 Physical attractiveness, peer problems, and aggressive behavior in middle childhood: A 3-year longitudinal study

(1) Kirsch, Fabian; (2) Krahé, Barbara; (3) Busching, Robert

(1) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany; (2) Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany; (3) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

221/6203 External control beliefs as mediator in the link between peers’ acceptance of aggression and aggression

(1) Jung, Janis; (2) Krahé, Barbara; (3) Busching, Robert

(1) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany; (2) Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany; (3) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

221/6204 The Contagious Effect of Deviant Behavior in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Multi-Level Study

(1) Busching, Robert; (2) Krahé, Barbara

(1) Psychologist, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany; (2) Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany