Symposia: Presentations III

Wednesday 5 July
14.30 - 16.10 h.
 

 

221/39 - Getting things done: New findings on reducing the intention-behaviour gap

Room: Manuel Falla

This symposium points to new research showing that the intention-behaviour gap does not need to be accepted as a given. We will describe aspects of the situation and person and self-regulatory strategies that affect the width of this gap.

Chair
Thomas Webb
Reader in Psychology. Department of Psychology. The University of Sheffield. Sheffield. United Kingdom.

221/3901 Translating intentions into health actions: the role of motivational coherence

(1) Sheeran, Paschal; (2) Conner, Mark

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill. US; (2) Professor. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK

221/3902 Effortless self-control for successfully operating on goals

(1) de Ridder, Denise; (2) Gillebaart, Marleen; (3) van der Weiden, Anouk; (4) Benjamins, Jeroen

(1) Professor. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.; (2) Assistant Professor. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.; (3) Postdoc. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.; (4) Assistant Professor. Clinical and Health Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands.

221/3903 Mental contrasting turns us into caretakers of ourselves

(1) Oettingen, Gabriele; (2) Schwörer, Bettina; (3) Reininger, K. Michael

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. US; (2) Dr. Institute for Psychology. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.; (3) Dr. Institute for Psychology. University of Hamburg. Hamburg. Germany.

221/3904 Understanding different ways of monitoring goal progress and their impact on goal attainment

(1) Webb, Thomas; (2) Harkin, Benjamin; (3) Chang, Betty; (4) Prestwich, Andrew; (5) Conner, Mark; (6) Kellar, Ian; (7) Benn, Yael

(1) Reader in Psychology. Department of Psychology. The University of Sheffield. Sheffield. UK; (2) Dr. Department of Psychology. The University of Sheffield. Sheffield. UK; (3) Dr. Center for Research in Cognition & Neurosciences. Universite Libre de Bruxelles. Brussels, Belgium.; (4) Senior Lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK.; (5) Professor. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK.; (6) Associate Professor of Health Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Leeds. Leeds. UK.; (7) Lecturer. Department of Psychology. Manchester Metropolitan University. Manchester. UK

221/3905 Enhancing group decisions via if–then planning

(1) Gollwitzer, Peter; (2) Thürmer, J. Lukas; (3) Wieber, Frank

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology. New York University. New York. US; (2) Interim Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Konstanz. Konstanz. Germany.; (3) Dr. Department of Psychology. University of Konstanz. Konstanz. Germany.

221/88 - Passion for knowledge: Emotional processes in the face of epistemic challenge.

Room: Machuca

We focus on knowledge emotions (curiosity, surprise, interest, boredom, doubt and confusion) and how they regulate reactions to our complex and surprising world. We discuss how and why these emotions arise, and what consequences they have for individual functioning.

Chair
Malgorzata Goclowska
Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Netherlands.

221/8801 Individual Differences in Epistemic Curiosity and Self-Regulation: At the Intersection of Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation

(1) Litman, Jordan

(1) St. Leo University & the Institute of Human and Machine Cognition Florida, USA

221/8802 Curiosity and time: From not knowing to almost knowing.

(1) Noordewier, Marret; (2) Van Dijk, Eric

(1) Social and Organizational Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands; (2) Social and Organizational Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

221/8803 Why schema-violations are sometimes preferable to schema-consistencies: The role of interest and openness to experience.

(1) Goclowska, Malgorzata; (2) Baas, Matthijs; (3) Elliot, Andrew; (4) De Dreu, Carsten K.W.

(1) Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; (2) Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; (3) Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, USA; (4) Social and Organizational Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

221/8804 Finding Meaning in Ideology: Going to Political Extremes in Response to Boredom.

(1) Van Tilburg, Wijnand; (2) Igou, Eric

(1) Department of Psychology, King’s College London, London, UK; (2) Psychology Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

221/8805 Lost and Found: Identifying and Distinguishing Forms of Epistemic Negative Affect

(1) Maher, Paul; (2) Van Tilburg, Wijnand; (3) Igou, Eric

(1) Psychology Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland; (2) Department of Psychology, King’s College London, London, UK; (3) Psychology Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

221/195 - The positive and negative effects of social diversity: Explaining its impact on individuals and groups

Room: Picasso

This symposium brings together research exploring the processes underlying the effects of social diversity (e.g., ethnic heterogeneity) for societies and their individuals. The presentations identify perceived threat and intergroup contact experiences as two of the most critical processes.

Chair
Miguel Ramos
Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. United Kingdom.

221/19501 The impact of changes in ethnic diversity for subjective well-being

(1) Ramos, Miguel; (2) Bennett, Matthew; (3) Hewstone, Miles

(1) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK; (2) Sociologist. Department of Sociology. University of Birmingham. Birmingham. UK; (3) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK

221/19502 Can positive intergroup contact reduce prejudice in negative intergroup contexts?

(1) Dhont, Kristof; (2) van Hiel, Alain; (3) Christ, Oliver; (4) Schmid, Katharina; (5) Wölfer, Ralf; (6) Lolliot, Simon; (7) Asbrock, Frank

(1) Psychologist. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK; (2) Psychologist. Dept. of Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology. Ghent University. Ghent. Belgium; (3) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Hagen. Hagen. Germany; (4) Psychologist. ESADE Business School. Ramon Llull University. Barcelona. Spain; (5) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK; (6) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada; (7) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. TU Chemnitz. Chemnitz. Germany

221/19503 Are diverse societies less cohesive? Advancing public policy responses to ethnic diversity

(1) Klik, Kathleen; (2) Reynolds, Kate; (3) McKenna, Sarah; (4) Lee, Eunro; (5) Hewstone, Miles; (6) Markus, Andrew

(1) Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia; (2) Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia; (3) Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia; (4) Psychologist. Research School of Psychology. Australian National University. Canberra. Australia; (5) Psychologist. Department of Experimental Psychology. University of Oxford. Oxford. UK; (6) Historian. School of Historical Studies. Monash University. Melbourne. Australia

221/19504 Perceiving demographic diversity as a threat: Effects of interethnic ideologies

(1) Osborn, Hannah; (2) Rios, Kimberly

(1) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ohio University. Athens. US; (2) Psychologist. Department of Psychology. Ohio University. Athens. US

221/19505 Managing diversity at the workplace: Can affirmative action policies increase interest in leadership positions?

(1) Nater, Christa; (2) Sczesny, Sabine

(1) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern. Switzerland; (2) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology. University of Bern. Bern. Switzerland

221/197 - Advances in theory and research on agency/competence and communion/warmth

Room: Dinner 1

Agency/competence and communion/warmth are the two fundamental content dimensions of social perception, figuring prominently in most areas of social psychology. This symposium brings together latest theory-advancing research on the topic, making use of latest research designs and methods.

Chair
Jennifer Eck
Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

221/19701 Self-presentation trade-offs: Status drives a competence downshift and (sometimes) a warmth upshift

(1) Fiske, Susan T.; (2) Swencionis, Jillian K.; (3) Dupree, Cydney H.

(1) Social psychologist. Department of Psychology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.; (2) Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.; (3) Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Princeton University. Princeton. New Jersey. USA.

221/19702 Negative gossip about agency affects a target’s self-concept, negative gossip about communion leads to reputation worries

(1) Abele Brehm, Andrea E.; (2) Hauke, Nicole

(1) Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Erlangen. Germany.; (2) Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Erlangen. Germany

221/19703 Agentic and communal rhetoric in the quest for political popularity

(1) Decter-Frain, Ari; (2) Frimer, Jeremy A.

(1) London School of Economics. UK; (2) Social psychologist. Department of Psychology. University of Winnipeg. Winnipeg. Canada.

221/19704 Can communal life-orientations quiet the ego? The cases of East-Asian culture, Christianity, and mind-body exercises

(1) Gebauer, Jochen

(1) Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

221/19705 The role of sociocultural norms in agency and communion effects

(1) Eck, Jennifer; (2) Gebauer, Jochen E.

(1) Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.; (2) Social psychologist. MZES. University of Mannheim. Mannheim. Germany.

221/71 - I'm feeling us: The development, management, and consequences of emotions in groups

Room: Dinner 2

Intragroup processes are drenched with emotions. In this symposium, a comprehensive set of papers addresses the development, regulation, and consequences of emotions in groups within a variety of settings (i.e., education, sport, work).

Chairs
Astrid C. Homan
Psychologist. Professor. Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Chairs
Marc W. Heerdink
Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

Chairs
Svenja A. Wolf
Sport Scientist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Social Psychology. Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/7101 Emotional conformity: A theoretical framework to explain emotional convergence in groups

(1) Wolf, Svenja A.; (2) van Kleef, Gerben A.; (3) Heerdink, Marc W.

(1) Sport Scientist. Postdoctoral Researcher. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.; (3) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/7102 Leader interpersonal emotion regulation influences affective dynamics and innovation in teams

(1) Niven, Karen; (2) Madrid, Hector

(1) Psychologist. Associate Professor. Alliance Manchester Business School. University of Manchester. UK.; (2) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Business and Management School. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Chile.

221/7103 Social support and interpersonal emotion regulation among varsity athletes

(1) Tamminen, Katherine; (2) Schellenberg, Ben; (3) Palmateer, Tess

(1) Sport Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education. University of Toronto. Toronto. Canada.; (2) Psychologist. Postdoctoral Fellow. School of Psychology. University of Ottawa. Ottawa. Canada.; (3) Sport Psychologist. Doctoral Student. University of North Texas. Denton. USA.

221/7104 Regulating emotions and emergent leadership

(1) Cheshin, Arik; (2) Luria, Gil

(1) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Department of Human Service. University of Haifa. Haifa. Israel.; (2) Psychologist. Professor. Department of Human Service. University of Haifa. Haifa, Israel.

221/7105 The positive side of specific negative group affective states: Pre-task anxiety boosts group performance

(1) Heerdink, Marc W.; (2) Homan, Astrid C.

(1) Psychologist. Assistant Professor. Social Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, The Netherlands.; (2) Astrid C. Homan, Psychologist. Professor. Work and Organizational Psychology. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

221/96 - Two sides of the same medal: Deception, its detection by, and consequences for others

Room: Andalucía III

People readily deceive others. In this symposium, we focus on different types of deception, how deception and (un)trustworthiness can be inferred and how a resulting mindset of distrust influences cognitive accessibility, abstraction abilities, and social comparison.

Chair
Corinna Michels
Psychologist. PhD Student. Department Psychology. University of Cologne. Cologne. Germany.

221/9601 Practice makes lies more perfect and honesty less perfect

(1) van Beest, Ilja; (2) van 't Veer, Anna; (3) Stel, Marielle

(1) Tilburg University, Netherlands.; (2) Leiden University, Netherlands; (3) University of Twente, Netherlands

221/9602 Determinants of impressions of trustworthiness from faces

(1) Todorov, Alexander

(1) Princeton University, USA

221/9603 Accessibility is a matter of trust: Dispositional and contextual distrust blocks accessibility effects

(1) Mayo, Ruth; (2) Kleiman, Tali; (3) Sher, Noa; (4) Elster, Andrey

(1) The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; (2) The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; (3) The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; (4) The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

221/9604 When trust leads to ‘non-social’ integration: Trust fosters information integration

(1) Posten, Ann-Christin; (2) Gino, Francesca

(1) University of Cologne, Germany; (2) Harvard University, USA

221/9605 Consequences of deception: Distrusting others reduces social comparison

(1) Michels, Corinna; (2) Burgmer, Pascal; (3) Mussweiler, Thomas

(1) University of Cologne, Germany; (2) University of Cologne, Germany; (3) London Business School, UK

221/98 - Implicit evaluations: How they change and what they do to close relationships

Room: Andalucía II

To better understand romantic relationships, it is important to go beyond explicit evaluations. The present symposium focuses on the assessment of implicit evaluations and on their impact to understand, and predict relationship processes above and beyond explicit evaluations.

Chair
Francesca Righetti
Assistant Professor. Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology. VU Amsterdam. Amsterdam. Netherlands.

221/9801 Implicit attitudes can shift to match the ones of a potential romantic partner

(1) Clark, Margaret; (2) Melnikoff, David; (3) Von Culin, Katherine; (4) Bargh, John

(1) Yale University; (2) Yale University; (3) Yale University; (4) Yale University

221/9802 Specifically aware, globally biased: Specific perceptions predict automatic partner evaluations better than do global evaluations

(1) Meltzer, Andrea; (2) Hicks, Lindsey; (3) McNulty, James

(1) Florida State University; (2) Florida State University; (3) Florida State University

221/9803 The Heat Is On ... or Maybe Not: Implicit Sexual Desire in Romantic Couples

(1) Reis, Harry; (2) de Jong, David; (3) Birnbaum, Gurit

(1) University of Rochester; (2) Western Carolina University; (3) Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya

221/9804 The hidden costs of sacrifice: Consequences for implicit partner evaluations

(1) Righetti, Francesca; (2) Hofmann, Wilhelm; (3) Pronk, Tila; (4) Van Lange, Paul

(1) VU Amsterdam; (2) University of Cologne; (3) Tilburg University; (4) VU Amsterdam

221/9805 Can Evaluative Conditioning Be Used to Improve Marriage?

(1) McNulty, James; (2) Olson, Michael

(1) Florida State University; (2) University of Tennessee

221/51 - Reasons for hope? Women’s reactions to gender stereotypes

Room: Seminar

We examine subtle cues that trigger implicit and explicit processes reinforcing gender stereotypes, but also counteracting them. Across five presentations, we investigate cultural and identity-based boundary conditions as well as potential interventions against the negative consequences of gender stereotypes.

Chair
Soledad de Lemus Martín
Assistant Professor. Social Psychology Department. University of Granada. Granada. Spain.

221/5101 The Activation of Negative Gender Stereotypes in Performance Situations Reduces Women’s Social Motivation

(1) Martiny, Sarah E.; (2) Nikitin, Jana

(1) UiT The Arctic University of Norway; (2) University of Basel, Germany

221/5102 Resisting Implicit Stereotypes through Evaluative and Behavioural Strategies.

(1) van Breen, Jolien; (2) Spears, Russell; (3) Kuppens, Toon; (4) de Lemus Martín, Soledad

(1) University of Groningen, the Netherlands; (2) University of Groningen, the Netherlands; (3) University of Groningen, the Netherlands; (4) Universidad de Granada, Spain

221/5103 Exposure to hostile sexism and gender stereotypes triggers resistance amongst women.

(1) Szastok, Marta; (2) Kossowska, Małgorzata

(1) Jagiellonian University, Poland; (2) Jagiellonian University, Poland

221/5104 Which man is Better in Fat and Lean Times? Perception of communal and agentic men

(1) Kosakowska-Berezecka, Natasza; (2) Besta, Tomasz; (3) Safdar, Saba; (4) Jurek, Paweł; (5) Bhardwaj, Gopa

(1) University of Gdańsk, Poland; (2) University of Gdańsk, Poland; (3) University of Guelph, Canada; (4) University of Gdańsk, Poland; (5) Galgotias University, India

221/5105 Female peers are “social vaccines” who protect women’s self-concept, persistence, and career aspirations in engineering

(1) Dasgupta, Nilanjana

(1) University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA

221/68 - Contemporary theoretical approaches to Social Identity Theory, Peace & Conflict

Room: Andalucía I

The symposium brings together researchers to discuss theoretical advances, and new directions for research in Social Identity Theory (SIT) with a focus on the dynamic role of identity in mediating threats and conflict in increasingly multi-faith and multi-cultural societies.

Chair
Neil Ferguson
Psychologist. Professor. Psychology Department. Liverpool Hope University. Liverpool. United Kingdom.

221/6801 Social categorisation, identity and acculturation: Processes underlying peace and conflict between groups

(1) Roscini, Claudia; (2) Stathi, Sofia; (3) Haji, Reeshma

(1) University of Greenwich, UK; (2) University of Greenwich, UK; (3) Laurentian University, Canada

221/6802 Social Identity Theory’s Self-Esteem Hypothesis: A Reformulation and an Extension

(1) Rubin, Mark; (2) Martiny, Sarah E

(1) The University of Newcastle, Australia; (2) UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway

221/6803 Identity threat, anxious uncertainty, and reactive ingroup affirmation –how can antisocial outcomes be prevented?

(1) Lüders, Adrian; (2) Jonas, Eva; (3) Fritsche, Immo; (4) Agroskin, Dimitrij

(1) University of Salzburg, Austria; (2) University of Salzburg, Austria; (3) University of Leipzig, Germany; (4) University of Salzburg, Austria

221/6804 Passing the Baton: Identity and collective memory transfer across the generations

(1) Ferguson, Neil

(1) Liverpool Hope University, UK