Symposia: Simultaneous Sessions II

Wednesday 5 July
11.10 - 12.50 h.
 

 

221/109 - Ego-depletion: Where do we Go from Here?

Room: Manuel Falla

Debates on whether and how self-regulatory failure would occur are still going on. In this symposium, we discuss recent evidence on the absence of the ego-depletion effect, and discuss perspectives on design features that may moderate the effect, theoretical explanations and perspectives on self-regulator failure.

Chair
Oulmann Zerhouni
Associate Professor of Social and Experimental Psychology, Parisian Laboratory of Social Psychology. Paris. France.

221/10901 Picking through the wreckage with a stick: Lessons learned from the ego-depletion replication and suggestions

(1) Hagger, Martin

(1) John Curtin Distinguished Professor. School of Psychology and Speech Pathology. Curtin University/University of Jyväskylä. Perth/Jyväskylä. Australia/Finland.

221/10902 Investigating the Ego Depletion Effect in Within-Participants Designs

(1) Gieseler, Karolin; (2) Herrmann, Christina; (3) Loschelder, David; (4) Job, Veronika; (5) Friese, Malte

(1) Research Associate. Department of Psychology, Saarland University. Sarrebruck. Germany.; (2) PhD Student. Department of Psychology, Saarland University. Homburg. Germany.; (3) Professor for Business Psychology and Experimental Methods. Department of Strategic HRM. University of Lueneburg. Lueneburg. Germany.; (4) Research Associate. Department of Psychology, University of Zurich. Zurich. Switzerland.; (5) Director of the Department of Psychology. Department of Psychology, Saarland University. Sarrebruck. Germany.

221/10903 Depleted or detached? Testing a process model of perceived opportunity costs

(1) Rom, Sarah; (2) Hofmann, Wilhelm

(1) PhD student. Social Cognition Center Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne. Germany.; (2) Full Professor of Social and Economic Cognition. Social Cognition Center Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne. Germany.

221/10904 Depleted but not swayed: does changes in self-control processes reduce evaluative conditioning?

(1) Zerhouni, Oulmann; (2) Bègue, Laurent; (3) Wiers, Reinout

(1) Associate Professor of Social and Experimental Psychology. Parisian Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Paris Nanterre. Paris. France.; (2) Full Professor of Social Psychology. LIPPC2S. University Grenoble-Alpes. Grenoble. France.; (3) Full professor of developmental psychopathology. Addiction Development and Psychopathology (ADAPT) lab. University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam. The Netherlands.

221/10905 Effects of trait self-control on experienced and i

(1) Gillebaart, Marleen

(1) Assistant Professor. Social, Health, and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands

221/94 - When and why mindfulness is an adaptive toolkit

Room: Machuca

Why is mindfulness adaptive? This symposium will discuss how mindfulness changes the negative impact of ambivalence, uncertainty, or a negative future prospect on emotions. It also debates when is it reasonable to expect mindfulness to result in healthier behaviour.

Chair
Gabriela Jiga-Boy
Senior lecturer. Department of Psychology. Swansea University. Swansea. United Kingdom.

221/9401 Mindfulness influences how people experience attitudinal ambivalence

(1) Haddock, Geoffrey; (2) Foad, Colin; (3) Windsor-Shellard, Ben

(1) Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK; (2) Lecturer. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK; (3) Graduate student. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK

221/9402 Exploring the link between mindfulness and the experience of uncertainty

(1) Adarves-Yorno, Inmaculada; (2) Mahdon, Michelle; (3) Schueltke, Leonie

(1) Senior lecturer. University of Exeter Business School. Exeter. UK; (2) Associate Research Fellow. University of Exeter Business School. Exeter. UK; (3) Intern. University of Exeter Business School. Exeter. UK

221/9403 Assessing the links among mindfulness, attentional control, and eating behaviour

(1) Vaughan, Karis; (2) Haddock, Geoffrey

(1) Graduate student. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK; (2) Professor. School of Psychology. Cardiff University. Cardiff. UK

221/9404 Mindful future thinking: Does trait mindfulness change the effects of self-distancing on anticipated negative emotions?

(1) Ashton, Holly; (2) Jiga-Boy, Gabriela

(1) Postgraduate student. Department of Psychology. Swansea University. Swansea. UK; (2) Senior lecturer. Department of Psychology. Swansea University. Swansea. UK

221/9405 Discussion

(1) Hopthrow, Tim

(1) Senior lecturer. School of Psychology. University of Kent. Canterbury. UK

221/92 - Does Intergroup Contact Undermine Social Change?: New Insights

Room: Picasso

This symposium provides new insights into when, why, and for whom cross-group contact acts as a facilitator or a barrier to social change and highlights the complexity of contact effects with respect to social change efforts.

Chair
Nicole Tausch
Psychologist. Reader. School Of Psychology and Neuroscience. University of St Andrews. Scotland.

221/9201 When Intergroup Contact Reduces Support for Social Change among Minorities: The Role of Reinterpreted Identities

(1) Pereira, Adrienne; (2) Green, Eva

(1) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne; (2) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne

221/9202 Effects of Majority Members’ Positive Contact on Minority Members’ Support for Ingroup Rights: (De)Mobilizing Effects?

(1) Christ, Oliver; (2) Kauff, Mathias; (3) Green, Eva; (4) Schmid, Katharina; (5) Hewstone, Miles

(1) Psychologist. FernUniversität Hagen, Germany; (2) Psychologist. FernUniversität Hagen, Germany; (3) Psychologist. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne; (4) Assistant Professor, Department of People Management and Organisation in ESADE. Spain.; (5) Psychologist. University of Oxford. UK

221/9203 Positive Cross-Group Contact: The Role of Supportive Contact in Empowering Collective Action

(1) Wright, Stephen; (2) Droogendyk, Lisa; (3) Qin, Siyu; (4) Louis, Winnifred

(1) Psychologist. Simon Fraser University. Canada.; (2) Psychologist. Sheridan College. Canada.; (3) Psychologist. Simon Fraser University. Canada.; (4) Psychologist. University of Queensland. Australia.

221/9204 Intergroup Contact Increases Support for Symbolic but not Material Forms of Equality: A Longitudinal Analysis

(1) Sengupta, Nikhil; (2) Barlow, Fiona Kate; (3) Sibley, Chris G.

(1) Psychologist. University of Auckland. New Zealand.; (2) Psychologist. University of Queensland. Australia.; (3) Psychologist. University of Auckland. New Zealand.

221/9205 Becoming Allies: Cross-group Contact and Solidarity among Members of Advantaged Groups

(1) Tausch, Nicole; (2) Górska, Paulina; (3) Saguy, Tamar; (4) Lolliot, Simon; (5) Bilewicz, Michal; (6) Bryson, Jeff

(1) Psychologist. University of St Andrews. Scotland; (2) Psychologist. Univertsity of Warsaw. Poland.; (3) Psychologist. IDC Herzilya. Israel.; (4) Psychologist. University of Oxford. UK; (5) Psychologist. Univertsity of Warsaw. Poland.; (6) Psychologist. San Diego State University. United States.

221/63 - The subtle cues and effects of social identity threat

Room: Dinner 1

This symposium brings together researchers showing that (1) experiences of social identity threat can be shaped in subtle ways in daily social interactions; and (2) social identity threat can have subtle and unexpected effects on person perception and emotion-regulation.

Chair
Jenny Veldman
PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.

221/6301 Interpersonal and cultural predictors of social identity threat

(1) Hall, William; (2) Schmader, Toni; (3) Aday, Audrey; (4) Croft, Elizabeth

(1) PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada; (3) PhD candidate. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada; (4) Professor. Department of Mechanical Engineering. The University of British Columbia. Vancouver. Canada

221/6302 Talking about science: The importance of feedback appraisals when women share interests in STEM

(1) Thoman, Dustin; (2) Curti, Christina; (3) Jackson, Matthew; (4) Smith, Jessi L.

(1) Assistant professor. Department of Psychology. San Diego State University. San Diego. USA; (2) PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. San Diego State University. San Diego. USA; (3) Post-Doc researcher. Department of Psychology. San Diego State University. San Diego. USA; (4) Associate professor. Department of Psychology. Montana State University. San Diego. USA

221/6303 Noticing what isn’t there: Underrepresentation of women increases the cognitive salience of other women

(1) Domen, Antoniella; (2) Derks, Belle; (3) van Veelen, Ruth; (4) Scheepers, Daan

(1) PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands; (3) Post-Doc. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands; (4) Associate Professor. Department of Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. the Netherlands

221/6304 Emotion regulation and working memory updating in response to stereotype threat

(1) Veldman, Jenny; (2) van Laar, Colette; (3) Meeussen, Loes; (4) Pe, Madeline; (5) Kuppens, Peter

(1) PhD candidate. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium; (2) Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium; (3) Post-Doc. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium; (4) Post-Doc. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium; (5) Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/6305 Hidden costs of dealing with stigma and social identity threat

(1) van Laar, Colette

(1) Professor. Department of Psychology. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/61 - The crowd and wider group relations: How collective actions change or maintain societal inequalities

Room: Dinner 2

Crowds can both change unequal societal relations but can also contribute to their maintenance. This symposium discusses how collective actions impact on relations of inequality and power and how powerful group use crowds to maintain their position.

Chair
John Drury
Reader in Social Psychology. School of Psychology. University of Sussex. United Kingdom.

221/6101 “Taking back that which is rightfully ours”: Critical Mass and the psychology of collective empowerment

(1) Neufeld, Scott; (2) Schmitt, Michael T.; (3) Reicher, Stephen D.

(1) Psychologist, PhD student. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada; (2) Professor. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada; (3) Professor, University of St. Andrews, St Andrews, UK

221/6102 The role of social identity and empowerment in the spread of the 2011 English riots

(1) Stott, Clifford; (2) Ball, Roger

(1) Professor, School of Psychology, Keele University, UK; (2) Research Fellow, School of Psychology, Keele University, UK

221/6103 Representations of cultural pathology and political argumentation: The December 2008 upheaval in Greek press accounts

(1) Bozatzis, Nikolaos

(1) Assistant Professor in Social Psychology, Department of Philosophy, Education and Psychology, University of Ioannina, Greece

221/6104 How crowds stop social change: An analysis of pro-government Democracy Meetings in post-coup Turkey

(1) Gülsüm Acar, Yasemin; (2) Reicher, Stephen D.

(1) Instructor, Social Science Faculty, Özyeğin University, Turkey; (2) Professor, University of St. Andrews, St Andrews, UK

221/55 - Context matters: Contextual influences on evaluative responses

Room: Andalucía III

This symposium demonstrates how context influences the formation and expression of evaluations. We show that by taking context into account, we can reconcile previously mixed findings and provide evidence that context significantly shapes affective, behavioral, and cognitive processes.

Chair
Hannah Nohlen
Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Canada.

221/5501 Evaluative context shapes physiological responses to ambivalent information.

(1) Nohlen, Hannah; (2) van Harreveld, Frenk; (3) Rotteveel, Mark; (4) Barends, Ard; (5) Larsen, Jeff

(1) Department of Psychology. University of Toronto. Toronto. Canada; (2) Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (3) Department of Psychology. University of Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (4) PhD student. Department of Psychology. Free University Amsterdam. The Netherlands; (5) Department of Psychology. University of Tennessee. USA

221/5502 Complex Emotions and Persuasion: An Appraisal Perspective

(1) Briñol, Pablo; (2) Petty, Richard E.; (3) Stavraki, Maria; (4) Díaz, Darío; (5) Lamprinakos, Grigorios

(1) Department of Psychology. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid. Spain; (2) Ohio State University. USA; (3) Universidad de Castilla la Mancha. Spain; (4) Universidad de Castilla la Mancha. Spain; (5) Athens University of Economics and Business. Greece

221/5503 Fleeting beauty: Beauty-in-averageness and context-dependent reversals

(1) Vogel, Tobias; (2) Carr, Evan W.; (3) Winkielman, Piotr

(1) University of Mannheim. Germany; (2) Columbia Business School. New York. USA; (3) University of California, San Diego, USA

221/5504 Contextualized Change of Automatic Evaluations: What We Learned from Our Own File Drawer

(1) Gawronski, Bertram; (2) Hu, Xiaoqing; (3) Rydell, Robert J.; (4) Vervliet, Bram; (5) de Houwer, Jan

(1) University of Texas at Austin. Austin, USA; (2) University of Hong Kong, China; (3) Indiana University, USA; (4) University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; (5) Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

221/5505 Regional attitudes and stereotypes predict police homicides and voting behavior

(1) Calanchini, Jimmy; (2) Sherman, Jeffrey W.; (3) Witkowski, Phillip; (4) Sparks, Jehan

(1) Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg. Freiburg. Germany; (2) University of California, Davis, USA; (3) University of California, Davis, USA; (4) University of California, Davis, USA

221/42 - Impression mismanagement: Why and how people fail at self-presentation

Room: Andalucía II

This symposium demonstrates how people systematically mismanage their public impression. Such impression mismanagement occurs because people fail to take their audience’s perspective or because they try to ineptly mask their bragging. These self-presentational failures lead to interpersonal disliking.

Chair
Janina Steinmetz
Assistant Professor at Utrecht University. Social and Organisational Psychology. Utrecht. Netherlands.

221/4201 The Hubris Hypothesis: You think you flaunt your qualities but I hear you denigrating mine

(1) Hoorens, Vera; (2) van Damme, Carolien

(1) Professor. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium.; (2) Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. University of Leuven. Leuven. Belgium

221/4202 If at first you do succeed: Unforeseen social costs of being naturally successful

(1) Steinmetz, Janina

(1) Assistant Professor. Social and Organisational Psychology. Utrecht University. Utrecht. Netherlands.

221/4203 Humblebragging: A distinct–and ineffective—self-presentation strategy

(1) Sezer, Ovul; (2) Gino, Francesca; (3) Norton, Michael

(1) PhD student. Harvard Business School. Cambridge. USA.; (2) Professor. Harvard Business School. Cambridge. USA.; (3) Professor. Harvard Business School. Cambridge. USA.

221/4204 Bragging through an intermediary

(1) Scopelliti, Irene; (2) Vosgerau, Joachim

(1) Senior Lecturer. Cass Business School. City University of London. London. UK; (2) Professor. Department of Marketing. Bocconi University. Milan. Italy

221/45 - Deviance 2.0: The social psychology of deviant opinions, expectancy violations, artistic deviance, and rule-breaking behavior

Room: Seminar

This symposium brings together lines of research that investigate the antecedents and consequences of deviant processes in order to shed light on people’s diverse reactions to deviance. We present research on deviant opinions, expectancy violations, artistic deviance, and rule-breaking behavior.

Chairs
Eftychia Stamkou
University of Amsterdam. Netherlands.

Chairs
Gerben A. van Kleef
University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

221/4501 Positive Deviance: How Authenticity Leads To Speaking Up

(1) Kouchaki, Maryam; (2) Brodsky, Andrew; (3) Gino, Francesca

(1) Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management; (2) Harvard Business School; (3) Harvard Business School

221/4502 Disfluency as an indicator of deviance: Theoretical perspectives and an empirical study

(1) Reber, Rolf; (2) Olav Skaar, Øystein

(1) University of Oslo; (2) University of Oslo

221/4503 The art of influence: When and why deviant artists

(1) Stamkou, Eftychia; (2) van Kleef, Gerben A.; (3) Homan, Astrid C.

(1) University of Amsterdam; (2) University of Amsterdam; (3) University of Amsterdam

221/4504 Rebel with a Cause: Abide by Local Norms but Violate Global Norms to Gain Influence.

(1) Wanders, Florian; (2) Homan, Astrid C.; (3) Van Vianen, Annelies; (4) van Kleef, Gerben A.

(1) University of Amsterdam; (2) University of Amsterdam; (3) University of Amsterdam; (4) University of Amsterdam

221/4505 Discussion

(1) Jetten, Jolanda

(1) University of Queensland, Australia

221/174 - The Deprived and the Privileged: Social Class and Inequality Outcomes on Cognition, Motivation and Achievement

Room: Andalucía I

This symposium examines how both social-class (dis)advantages and social-economic stratification may impact individuals’ cognition, motivation and achievement. We review a large spectrum of mechanisms from low-level cognition to structural dynamics that broaden our understanding of social reproduction.

Chairs
GOUDEAU Sébastien
Doctor. Centre d'Etudes sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage. University of Poitiers & CNRS (UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.

Chairs
Alice Normand
Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive. University of Clermont Auvergne (UCA). France.

221/17401 Money issues exhaust low-income individuals’ selective attention

(1) Alice, Normand

(1) Assistant Professor. Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive (CNRS; UMR 6024). University of Clermont Auvergne (UCA). Clermont-Ferrand. France

221/17402 Hidden (dis)advantage of Social Class: How Classroom Settings Reproduce Social Inequality by Staging Unfair Comparison

(1) Sébastien, GOUDEAU; (2) Jean-Claude, Croizet

(1) PhD, Post-doc. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage (CeRCA, University of Poitiers & CNRS, UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.; (2) Professor. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage (CeRCA, University of Poitiers & CNRS, UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.

221/17403 Social-class (dis)advantage in assessment: How evaluators favor high-SES pupils

(1) Frédérique, Autin; (2) Anatolia, Batruch; (3) Fabrizio, Butera

(1) Assistant Professor. Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage (CeRCA, University of Poitiers & CNRS, UMR 7295). Poitiers. France.; (2) PhD student. Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne (UNIL). Lausanne. Switzerland; (3) Professor. Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne (UNIL). Lausanne. Switzerland

221/17404 A Privilege Lens: Merit and Maintenance Concerns Underlying Class-Based Behavior

(1) Taylor, Phillips

(1) Assistant Professor. School of Business. New York University Stern. NY. USA

221/17405 Income Inequality, Perceived Competitiveness, and Approach-Avoidance Motivation

(1) Nicolas, Sommet; (2) Andrew, Elliot; (3) Jeremy, Jamieson; (4) Fabrizio, Butera

(1) PhD, Post-doc. University of Rochester, NY, USA. University of Lausanne, Switzerland.; (2) Professor. University of Rochester, NY, USA.; (3) Assistant Professor. University of Rochester, NY, USA.; (4) Professor. Laboratory of Social Psychology. University of Lausanne (UNIL). Lausanne. Switzerland