Symposia: 221/99 - New Directions in the Study of Prejudice in Childhood and Adolescence

Wednesday 5 July
9.00 - 10.40 h.
Picasso
Prejudice remains a pressing social issue that can perpetuate social inequalities and fuel intergroup conflict. We showcase research from across Europe and beyond that aims to enhance our empirical and theoretical understanding of prejudice and victimization in childhood and adolescence.

 

Chair
Jennifer R. Steele
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada

 

221/9901 Experimental evidence for an intervention preparing Dutch school children for the arrival of refugee children.

(1) Feddes, Allard; (2) Knape, Sophie

(1) Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; (2) Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

221/9902 Stories that move them: Changing children’s behaviour toward diverse peers

(1) Williams, Amanda; (2) McKeown Jones, Shelley; (3) Pauker, Kristin

(1) Lecturer in Psychology, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, England; (2) Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, England; (3) Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA

221/9903 The effect of social categorization on children’s implicit attitudes

(1) Steele, Jennifer R.; (2) Lipman, Corey; (3) Williams, Amanda

(1) Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada; (2) Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada; (3) Lecturer in Psychology, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, England

221/9904 Trajectories of Victimization in Ethnic Diaspora Immigrant and Native Adolescents: Separating Acculturation from Development

(1) Jugert, Philipp; (2) Titzmann, Peter F.

(1) University of Leipzig; (2) Professor, Department of Psychology, Leibniz University Hannover and University of Zurich

221/9905 Discussant

(1) Cameron, Lindsey

(1) Senior Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Kent, Kent, England